God Is One Textbook Questions And Answers Of ICSE Board Class 8 Moral Science

God Is One Textbook Questions And Answers Of ICSE Board Class 8 Moral Science

You are going to go through God Is One Textbook Questions And Answers OF ICSE Board Class 8 Moral Science. Understanding a text meticulously in its entirety is very important for a learner for scoring better in the exam. Experts made ample to ensure a thorough critical and line-by-line analysis. Let us find God Is One Textbook Questions And Answers OF ICSE Board Class 8 Moral Science.

God Is One Textbook Questions And Answers

Textbook Questions And Answers

1. What do you mean by worship?
Ans: The mode of expressing one’s belief in God is called worship.

2. What do you mean by religion?
Ans: A religion is a fundamental set of beliefs, symbols and practices agreed upon by a group of people. These beliefs include some devotional and ritual observances. Religion comes up with a moral code that governs the conduct of human affairs of that particular religion.

3. How are the basic teachings of all the religions the same?
Ans: The basic teachings of all the religions are the same, that is, a person should realise his self, perform good deeds, love his fellow beings, and stay devoted to God so as to attain happiness and peace of mind.

4. How can we show religious tolerance?
Ans: Being tolerant and loving towards all regions shows one’s reverence towards God. This can be done through the principle of universal brotherhood. Showing respect and acceptance towards all religions is a way of being tolerant to them. We should believe that all religions are equal and have faith in God.

5. Mark the statements as correct or wrong:

  1. Worshipping God is the duty of mankind. – Correct.
  2. All the people of the world practice the same religion. – Wrong.
  3. People of all religions call God by one common name. – Wrong.
  4. God is one. – Correct.
  5. All religions are equal. – Correct.

6. Match the religions with their Gods:

Christianity                         Jesus Christ
Hinduism                           Bhagwan
Sikhism                              Waheguru
Islam                                  Allah

7. What is your opinion as regards God?
a) There is only one God who takes care of the entire world.
b) There are different Gods who take care of the people of their religions.
Ans: a) There is only one God who takes care of the entire world.

8. Surf the Internet to find quotations from the following holy books:
a) The Bhagavad Gita: “Man is made by his belief. As he believes, so he is!”

b) The Bible: “Love is patient, love is kind. It does not envy, it does not boast, it is not proud.”

c) The Quran: “Guide us to the straight path.”

d) The Guru Granth Sahib: “A saint is better off without bathing. A thief is always a thief whether he bathes in sacred waters, or not.”

e) The Zend Avesta: “God bears in mind all prayers made to Him, past, present, and future; those made by ordinary people as well as the believers in many gods.”

Reverance Towards God Textbook Questions And Answers ICSE Class 8 Moral Science

Reverance Towards God Textbook Questions And Answers ICSE Class 8 Moral Science

You are going to go through Reverance Towards God Textbook Questions And Answers ICSE Class 8 Moral Science. Understanding a text meticulously in its entirety is very important for a learner for scoring better in the exam. Experts made ample to ensure a thorough critical and line-by-line analysis. Let us find Reverance Towards God Textbook Questions And Answers ICSE Class 8 Moral Science.

Reverance Towards God Textbook Questions And Answers

Textbook Questions And Answers

1. How is the universe charged?
Ans: The universe is charged with God’s splendour and power.

2. What is full of beauty and serenity?
Ans: Nature is full of beauty and serenity.

3. What is the theme of the poem?
Ans: Devotion for God is the theme of the poem.

4. When the famine struck, what was the villagers’ approach towards God?
Ans: When the famine struck, the villagers started going to the temple more frequently. They would often visit twice or thrice a day. The villagers would also gather and perform various rituals.

5. What did the priest understand and realise?
Ans: The priest realised that when there was any trouble, people would go and pray to God. Once God saved them from distress, they would forget God. To this the priest realised that this was the reason that God does not consider these people as his true devotees.

6. Fill in the blanks:

  1. The whole universe is God’s abode.
  2. Nature is also a creation of God.
  3. God’s footprints are scattered all over nature.
  4. God is the fountain of all goodness.
  5. God is a reality.

7. In your opinion, whom does God bless?
A person who is devoted towards Him and is content with what he has.

A person who every now and then asks for some or the other thing from God.

Ans: a) A person who is devoted towards Him and is content with what he has.

8. Find the antonyms of the following words:

  1. Belief: Disbelief.
  2. Love: Hate.
  3. Honesty: Dishonesty.
  4. Humility: Proud.
  5. Happy: Sad.
  6. Able: Disable.
  7. Brave: Coward.
  8. Kindness: Cruelty.

Line By Line Analysis Of I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings By Maya Angelou ICSE Class 9, 10 English Literature

Line By Line Analysis Of I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings By Maya Angelou ICSE Class 9, 10 English Literature

In this, you are going to go through Line By Line Analysis Of I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings By Maya Angelou ICSE Class 9, 10 English Literature. Understanding a text meticulously in its totality is very important for a learner for scoring better in the ICSE Board exam. Experts made ample to ensure a thorough critical and line-by-line analysis. Let us find Line By Line Analysis Of I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings By Maya Angelou ICSE Class 9, 10 English Literature.

Line By Line Analysis Of I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings By Maya Angelou

About The Poet

Maya Angelou was an acclaimed American poet, storyteller, singer, memoirist and autobiographies. She was born Marguerite Johnson in St. Louis, Missouri on April 4, 1928. She is widely regarded as the “ Black Women’s Poet Laureate”. She spent much of her childhood in there of her paternal grandmother in rural Stamps, Arkansas. When she was nearly eight years old, she was ravished by her mother’s boyfriend and told of it, after which he was murdered; the traumatic situation left her dumbstruck for nearly five long years! She was best known for her seven autobiographical books:

  1. Mom & Me & Mom (Random House, 2014);
  2. Letter to My Daughter (Random House, 2008);
  3. All God’s Children Need Traveling Shoes (Random House, 1986);
  4. The Heart of a Woman (Random House, 1981);
  5. Singin’ and Swingin’ and Gettin’ Merry Like Christmas (Random House, 1974);
  6. I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings (Random House, 1969),

which was nominated for the Nation Book Award. Her poetry: Just Give Me a Cool Drink of Water ‘fore I Diiie’(1971), was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize. Her autobiographies reflect the themes of economic, racial and sexual oppression. She found encouragement for her literary talents at the Harlem Writers’ Guild

Among numerous honours was her invitation to compose and deliver a poem, “On the Pulse of Morning”, for the inauguration of U.S President Bill Clinton in 1993. One of her famous quotes is “ There is no agony than bearing an untold story inside you”. These lines portrayed her utmost zeal to voice her opinions. Further, critic Robert B. Stepto praises her for borrowing “ various folks rhythms and forms and thereby buttresses her poems by evoking aspects of a culture’s written and unwritten heritage”.

About The Poem

The poem “ I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings” also known as “ Caged Bird” was published in the year 1983 in the poetry collection “Shaker, Why Don’t You Sing?” It describes the early years of the American writer and poet and conveys the notion of how the strength of character and love of literature can help overcome racism and trauma. It is said that the writers James Baldwin and cartoonist Julie Feiffer inspired
her to write this famous workpiece. The poem can be seen as a portrayal of social disparity, and the ideals of freedom and justice. Angelo, with the use of metaphorical birds, represents the inequality of justice seen in the society of her time which differentiates between the African-American community and its White counterparts. It is a heart-wrenching poem that reflects on the mindless oppression the Blacks were subjected to back in olden days. Maya Angelou takes her title from Paul Lawrence Dunbar’s poem entitled Sympathy. Dunbar’s caged bird sings from the frustration of imprisonment; its song is a form of prayer. In addition, Angelou’s caged bird sings also from frustration, in doing so, she uncovers the fact that the song transforms the cage from a prison that denies selfhood to a vehicle for self-realization.

Structure Of The Poem

A free bird leaps

on the back of the wind

and floats downstream

till the current ends

and dips his wing

in the orange sun rays

and dares to claim the sky.

But a bird that stalks

down his narrow cage

can seldom see through

his bars of rage

his wings are clipped and

his feet are tied

so he opens his throat to sing.

The caged bird sings

with a fearful trill

of things unknown

but longed for still

and his tune is heard

on the distant hill

for the caged bird

sings of freedom.

The free bird thinks of another breeze

and the trade winds soft through the sighing trees

and the fat worms waiting on a dawn bright lawn

and he names the sky his own

But a caged bird stands on the grave of dreams

his shadow shouts on a nightmare scream

his wings are clipped and his feet are tied

so he opens his throat to sing.

The caged bird sings

with a fearful trill

of things unknown

but longed for still

and his tune is heard

on the distant hill

for the caged bird

sings of freedom.

The poem is a free verse. There are a total of six stanzas in the poem with the third stanza being repeated at the end. Each line begins with a capital letter and the rest are in small letters. The poet has not used any comma, semicolon at the end, indicating the rhythmic flow of the verse. Angelo does not allow meter, rhyme, and stanza to control her poetry. She allowed the unrestricted flow in the sentences to intensify the importance of freedom in life. In the 36 lined poem, all the lines are very unembellished which helps to convey the complete meaning. In each sentence of the poem, the noun is placed in front of the verb, which might be because the poet wanted the readers to focus on the differences between the lives of the two birds that are caged and free and bring out their different dreams. This poem derives its power from rich vibrant imagery that encourages the readers to appreciate and interpret the poem in a variety of ways. The number of syllables in each line is inconsistent. There is a repetition of the word “freedom”. Also, the third stanza is also repeated at the end which brings out the importance of freedom in the life of every being.

Literary Devices Of The Poem

There are many poetic devices in the poem. Some of them are discussed below:-

1. Metaphor – A figure of speech in which a comparison between two different things is implied, but not clearly stated.
Examples in the poem are:

  • “ Caged Bird”
  • “ Bars of Rage”
  • “Narrow cage”

2. Repetition – The third stanza is repeated at the end.

“The caged bird sings

with a fearful trill

of things unknown

but longed for still

and his tune is heard

on the distant hill

for the caged bird

sings of freedom.”

3. Personification–The abstract ideas are invested with personality and both inanimate and abstract ideas are endowed with the attributes of living beings. The example of personification in this poem is “ His shadow shouts on a nightmare scream”, here shadow is personified.

4. Hyperbole– It is identified as an extravagant exaggeration, not to be taken literally but used figuratively to create emphasis.

5. Allusion– The title of the poem is a reference to Paul Laurence Dunbar’s poem “Sympathy”.

Theme Of The Poem

There are various themes of the poem and it touches a wide arena of perspectives.

1. Freedom versus Enslavement: The theme of freedom and confinement I.e. enslavement is prominent throughout the poem. The portrayal of the free bird living a life of phenomenal joy and liberty stands for freedom, while enslavement is symbolized by the shackled life of the caged bird whose “wings, are clipped and his feet are tied”.

The poem begins with a free leaping bird gliding in the open sky and is exposed to all the pleasures of freed self.

A free bird leaps

on the back of the wind

and floats downstream

However, the caged bird lives an enslaved life in a “narrow cage”. It represents the social disparity between the Whites and the African-American communities during the times of the Civil War

Moreover, the free bird is aware of its freedom and dares to claim the sky it’s own. It flies through the orange hue of the sky and dips its wings. With the use of the colour imagery of orange rays, the effect heightens -as orange is a colour associated with glow and contentment.

The free bird thinks of another breeze I.e. the wishes to get the most of his liberty and also feeds on “ fat worms”; on the contrary, the only thing attainable for the caged bird is his voice through which it can sing his song of unmeasured melancholy. Singing is symbolic of his rebellion against oppression. The idea of freedom is “unknown” to him yet the bird yearns for the long awaiting enjoyment. An abolitionist Frederick Douglass once said, “ Slaves sing most when they are most unhappy”. The poem ends on a positive remark as the voice of the caged bird is heard on a distant hill “ and his voice is heard on a distant hill”.

Racism and Slavery: The poem conveys the pent up sentiments of the poet against racial discrimination and social injustice in the form of slavery which was prevalent in America in the Civil War era. Though the poet never mentions it directly. The “free” bird represents the privileged Whites whereas the “caged” bird an extended metaphor depicts the enslaved African – American community of America. It captures the overwhelming agony and barbarity of oppression of the marginalized communities by relating it to the misery of the forever caged bird. Until 1965, under a system of racial segregation, named “ Jim Crow” the blacks of the Southern United States, lived in poverty. They were denied basic needs like the right to vote, public transport owing to their colour.

The caged bird is the reference to the social, mental suffering of the African-American Blacks. The bird could not fly on his own will and ambition.

Questions And Answers

What is the overall meaning of I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings?

The purpose of I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou is to make sense of what has happened to her and to provide hope for other survivors. The meaning of this powerful autobiography is that one should never lose hope.

Why you should read I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings?

In I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, the first autobiographical book by Maya Angelou, the acclaimed author gives readers a profound education about the lives of black people in the American South during the 1930s.

What is the author’s message in Caged Bird?

The message of Maya Angelou’s poem “Caged Bird” seems to be that any person who is oppressed or “caged” will always continue to “long” for freedom, knowing that if others are entitled to it, they should be entitled to it, too.

Why is I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings still relevant today?

“I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings” is historically significant because it not only reminds the readers of the horrors our society has avoided repeating, but details the pain and loss that black people endured at such a cruel point in American history.

Why Maya Angelou wrote caged bird?

After the 1968 assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr., Angelou was inspired by a meeting with writer James Baldwin and cartoonist Jules Feiffer to write I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings as a way of dealing with the death of her friend and to draw attention to her own personal struggles with racism.

What is the metaphor in Caged bird?

The first metaphor is of the free bird that is for the white Americans or free people, while the caged bird is the metaphor of African Americans and their captivity in the social norms.

Line By Line Analysis Of You Start Dying Slowly By Pablo Neruda Maharashtra Board Class 10 English

Line By Line Analysis Of You Start Dying Slowly By Pablo Neruda Maharashtra Board Class 10 English

In this, you are going to go through Line By Line Analysis Of You Start Dying Slowly By Pablo Neruda Maharashtra Board Class 10 English. Understanding a text meticulously in its totality is very important for a learner for scoring better in the Maharashtra Board English exam. Experts made ample to ensure a thorough critical and line-by-line analysis. Let us find Line By Line Analysis Of You Start Dying Slowly By Pablo Neruda Maharashtra Board Class 10 English.

Line By Line Analysis Of You Start Dying Slowly

About the Poet

Ricardo Eliécer Neftalí Reyes Basoalto was named Pablo Neruda, born on 12 July 1904, in Parral. He was a poet, diplomat, and politician. He was also an atheist. He started writing when he was 13 years old in a variety of styles. He used to write love poems, autobiographies, historical epic, etc. In the winter of 1914, he composed his first poems.

Intending to become a teacher, Neruda moved to Santiago to study French at the Universidad de Chile. All his time, he devoted himself to writing poems. He met and impressed the most critical publisher in Chile, Don Carlos George Nascimento. Neruda’s work, the collection Tentativa del hombre infinito, and the novel El habitante y su esperanza got published in 1926.

For the very first time, he was politicized intensely, as Spain became engulfed in the civil war. Neruda was found to be an ardent Communist. He was appointed special Consul for Spanish emigrants in Paris, following the election of Pedro Aguirre Cerda as President of Chile in 1938. His diplomatic post was being the Consul General in Mexico City. He later regretted his fondness for the Soviet Union. Neruda was also elected as a Communist Senator.

Neruda published his epic poem Canto General, a Whitmanesque. He thoroughly enjoyed worldwide fame as a poet. Later his books were being translated into virtually all the major languages of the world. Neruda was also nominated as a candidate for the Chilean presidency.

In 1917, Neruda was awarded the Nobel Prize for literature.

About the Poem

The poet in the poem talks about the beauty and the importance of life. He advises the readers to live a better, more satisfying life. He shows the readers how to live their life beautifully, experiencing new things. It encourages readers on how to chase their dreams. If we are afraid and do not pursue our thoughts, our reproductions can become meaningless, and it is as good as dying slowly.

We get attracted to loneliness and negativity.

The poet shows the difference between living and existing. He says that life becomes meaningful when we are accepting new challenges and new things. If we lose our self-esteem and lead a boring life, we will start dying, not from outside but surely from inside.

Structure of the Poem

“You start dying slowly
if you do not travel,
if you do not read,
If you do not listen to the sounds of life,
If you do not appreciate yourself.

You start dying slowly
When you kill your self-esteem;
When you do not let others help you.
You start dying slowly.

If you become a slave of your habits,
Walking every day on the same paths.
If you do not change your routine,
If you do not wear different colors
Or you do not speak to those you don’t know.

You start dying slowly
If you avoid feeling the passion
And their turbulent emotions;
Those which make your eyes glisten
And your heartbeat fast.
You start dying slowly.

If you do not change your life when you are not satisfied with your job, or with your love,
If you do not risk what is safe for the uncertain,
If you do not go after a dream,
If you do not allow yourself,
At least once in your lifetime,
To run away from sensible advice.”

The poem has got no particular rhyming scheme, and it is a free-verse rhyme scheme. There is the use of metaphors. It shows the readers how to live their life gracefully, experiencing new things. It advises readers on how to chase their dreams.

Analysis Of The Poem

“You start dying slowly
if you do not travel,
if you do not read,
If you do not listen to the sounds of life,
If you do not appreciate yourself.
You start dying slowly.

The poet says to travel to different places and gain new experiences. He says so because, according to him, life is so small, and it is difficult to get all experiences in life so one should fully live his or her life. He also advises the reader to keep reading in life to experience the unseen. He also warns against listening to the sounds or the music of life, like the noise, sounds, the moves of life, nature, etc. The poet advices to listen to our inner self, what our heart desires. He says not to get attracted to silence or negativity. The one who can read the sound of silence can conquer everything in life. We won’t be encouraged until and unless we appreciate ourselves for our work. If we don’t do all this, then one starts getting attracted to negativity.

When you kill your self-esteem;
When you do not let others help you.
You start dying slowly.

He says all are the same; no one is inferior or superiors. He says one should never lose self-esteem, how can one expect respect from others when we don’t have any self-respect. The more we prefer silence, keep ourselves away from us, the more we stop them from helping us. We choose negativity and loneliness over anything else. We throw hope away from our life and start dying slowly.

If you become a slave of your habits,
Walking every day on the same paths.
If you do not change your routine,
If you do not wear different colors
Or you do not speak to those you don’t know.
You start dying slowly.

We should recognize our bad habits and throw them away as soon as possible. We shouldn’t allow our bad habits to overpower us. Whereas on the other side it is challenging to acquire good habits, but once we are successful in getting good habits, it helps us in our better future. He says to look for new things related to life or carrier, keeping aside all the negative stuff. We should play with the colors of life, colors of different emotions like joys and sorrows, loyalty and disloyalty, etc. We should acquire ourselves, talk to every single one, or else we will be responsible for our monotonous life.

If you avoid to feel the passion
And their turbulent emotions;
Those which make your eyes glisten
And your heartbeat fast.
You start dying slowly.

Everyone dreams of achieving their goal, and ones they are successful in achieving the goal they know, how much efforts are needed to make it. That very moment is worth remembering. It feels so good to be successful.

We should be living our life and do our best. Once we start residing without passion for doing great things, we start dying mentally.

If you do not risk what is safe for the uncertain,
If you do not go after a dream,
If you do not allow yourself,
At least once in your lifetime,
To run away from sensible advice.”

The poet says that one must keep doing things they like and keep gaining experience; life will be boring and monotonous. We must be cautious while choosing our job, and we should go for the one we are comfortable with. Sometimes we go for the one we are meant to do, and we get disappointed because we don’t want to go out of our comfort zone; we don’t like taking risks. We don’t challenge our talent; we don’t chase a dream. All this becomes a burden, and it kills one from inside slowly.

Literary Devices Used

Anaphora:- it is the literary device called repetition of sentence, word, and phrase. Such as in this poem writer has repeated the words and sentences.

“you start dying slowly,” “If you do not.”

Antimere: it is a literary device used in this poem, it stated that when a part of speech played a role as another word class.

– You start dying slowly.

Repetition:- the action of repeating something that has already been said or written.

Like, “you start dying slowly,” “if you do not.”

Aposiopesis: It is a literary device used in the poem that means when the writer is unable to continue the speech.

You start dying slowly.

If you become a slave of your habits,

Walking every day on the same paths.

If you do not change your routine,

If you do not wear different colors

Or you do not speak to those you don’t know.

The Theme of The Poem

The theme of the poem “You Start Dying Slowly” teaches us how to lead our lives. The verse says that we should follow our passion for happily living and experiencing life. The poet also advises the reader to keep reading in life to experience the unseen. He also warns against listening to the sounds of life or inner-self. The poet says to travel to different places and gain new experiences.

The poet says to do things that we love to do, or we are comfortable with. The poet says that one must keep doing something they like and keep gaining experience; life will be boring and monotonous.

If we are afraid and do not chase your dreams, our lives can become meaningless and are as good as dying slowly.

Questions And Answers

Who wrote the poem you start dying slowly?

Pablo Neruda is the writer of the poem. He was a Chilean author who wrote romantic poetry and won the Literature Nobel Prize in 1971.

What is the central idea of the poem you start dying slowly?

The central idea of the poem is how you should lead your life.

What expression is repeated in the poem How many times why do you think the poet emphasizes it?

The expression ‘you do not’ is repeated in the poem, twelve times. The poet emphasises on this particular expression because he wants us to truly live by doing the things mentioned in the poem because not doing them would mean merely surviving and not enjoying life.

To A Pair Of Sarus Cranes By Manmohan Singh Questions And Answers Karnataka Board Class 10 English Poems

To A Pair Of Sarus Cranes By Manmohan Singh Questions And Answers Karnataka Board Class 10 English Poems

In this, you are going to go through To A Pair Of Sarus Cranes By Manmohan Singh Questions And Answers Karnataka Board Class 10 English Poems. Understanding a text meticulously in its totality is very important for a learner for scoring better in the Karnataka board exam. Experts made ample to ensure a thorough explanation of questions and answers. Let us find To A Pair Of Sarus Cranes By Manmohan Singh Questions And Answers Karnataka Board Class 10 English Poems.

To A Pair Of Sarus Cranes By Manmohan Singh Questions And Answers

Comprehension Questions

Answer briefly the following questions :

1. The time of the day suggested in the poem is

a. sunrise b. sunset c. either sunrise or sunset d. not clear

=(a) sunrise

2. The sun is described as the reluctant sun. It means that

a. the sun was unwilling to rise.

b. the male bird was impatient.

c. it was the bird’s feeling that the sun was reluctant to rise.

d. the sun always takes more time to rise than to set.

=(a) the sun was unwilling to rise.

=The male sarus appears as adapting to cull the sun out from the edge of the skyline. Surely, the winged animal can’t contact the sun with its nose or even arrive at the skyline. The bowed neck of the fowl and the exciting developments of the flying creature demonstrates the manner.

b. What is the figure of speech used here?
=Hyperbole is the figures of speech in use there.

4. How was the majestic neck humbled by the hunter?
=The neck of a Sarus crane is long, smooth, and wonderful. When the fledgeling was extending its neck and attempting to accomplish something incomprehensible like hauling the sun out of the edge of the skyline, the flying creature received a shot in the neck.

At the point when it tumbled down dead, the tracker, without giving any consideration to the excellence that was lost through his activity, nonchalantly got the winged animal’s hands and jaws’, folded it like a bit of paper, and tossed it into his pack without a second glance at it. As such, the magnificent neck has lowered the tracker.

5. The expression “picked up hands and jaws,” suggests,

a. callousness of the hunters.

b. heartlessness of the hunters.

c. urgency of the hunters.

d. cruelty of the hunters.

=(a) callousness of the hunters

6. ———————— is compared to ‘dirty linen’ (complete the sentence using the correct option)

a. the proud neck of the bird
b. the dead body of the bird

c. the hands and jaws of the bird

d. the material of the bag

=(b) the dead body of the bird

7. “and sat to hatch/the blood-stained feathers/into a toddling chick”. This suggests,

a. that the female bird was out of her senses after the death of the male bird.

b. the intense love of the female bird towards its male partner.

c. the foolish act of the female bird.

d. the desperate act of the female bird to bring the male bird back to life.

=(a) that the female bird was out of her senses after the death of the male bird.

8. How is the end of the female crane suggested in the poem?

-In the end, a flood of the sea’s she had never observed’ went to her and diverted her. It is not the genuine ocean because the cranes lived close to the ocean. It very well may be a rush of sadness which the fowl had never referred to as long as her accomplice was alive.

She was in every case exceptionally cheerful, and the demise of the male fowl pushed her towards pity. Lamenting for the male winged creature and sitting on his blood-stained quills, the female fledgling neglected to eat or drink and hence, turning out to be extremely frail, met her end.

Close Study

Read the following extract carefully. Discuss in pairs and then write the answers to the questions given below it.

1. A wave of the seas she had never seen/came to her from far away/and carried her to him.

a. What does ‘wave of the seas’ refer to?

=‘wave of the seas’ refers to A wave of grief.

b. What hadn’t the female bird seen before?

=The female bird hadn’t known grief or sadness before.

c. What figure of speech is used in the extract?

=Personifications.

Paragraph Writing

Discuss in pairs/groups of four each and answer the following questions. Individually, note down the points for each question and then develop the points into one-paragraph answers.

1. How is the callousness of the bird-killers brought out in the poem?
=The callousness of the bird is brought out in the manner the artist portrays the slaughtering of a male status fowl. It was shot when the flying creature had dunked its nose in the water.

It appeared as though it was attempting to haul the hesitant sun out of the water at the edge of the skyline. The trackers were not moved by the excellence of the fowl. They got the dead winged animal by its hands and jaws, what’s more, flung it into a course sack as though it were a bit of filthy material and the pack a washing sack.

2. How does the poet bring out the agony and desperation of the female crane in the poem?
=The crane’s pair forever. When the female crane got to see the trackers shot its mate dead and removed, the female sarus felt crushed. The fowl surrounded the sky with elegance grieving over the shameful finish of its accomplice.

After the executioners had left the spot, the female fledgling got back to the demise scene and continued flying around whimpering for its companions« with short and long moans looking like the Morse Code.

With her nose, she kissed and bloodstained quills of her mate which the breeze had not yet diverted, and plunked down to incubate them in the expectation she could resurrect him. This shows the misery and the give up on the winged animal.

3. Pick out any two figures of speech used in the poem and explain how they add to the effectiveness of the poem.
= The two figures of speech used in the poem are:-

Hyperbole:
The male Sarus crane has appeared as though it is extending its neck to pull out the sun from the edge of the skyline. It is demonstrated to be occupied with an outlandish demonstration, but the very endeavour to do it shows the mental fortitude of the crane. Notwithstanding, the fowl was no counterpart for the shrewdness and wantonness of man.

Personification:
A wave of the seas she had never seen/came to her from far away/and carried her to him.

Questions And Answers

What does the poem to a pair of Sarus cranes describe?

A poet tells about the cold nature of a killer. He does not care about the sentiments of cranes. They act heartless towards the pair of cranes. A killer shot dead the male crane when it was least expected.

What does Hume say about Sarus crane?

Ornithologist Hume had said that Sarus cranes pair for life. Here the female crane goes beyond his words, and pairs in the other world too. Poem shows how birds can be more loyal and nobler than man.

Who wrote the poem to a pair of Sarus cranes?

The writer of the poem ‘A pair of sarus cranes’ is ‘Manmohan Singh’.

What time of the day is suggested in the poem to a pair of Sarus crane?

Time of the day suggested in the poem is the dawn.

What is compared to dirty linen in the poem to a pair of Sarus cranes?

In the poem To a pair of Sarus Cranes the dead body of the male Sarus crane is compared to dirty linen.

How did the female crane express her sorrow on the death of her male partner?

The female sarus crane flew in circles, over its dead mate, shot down mercilessly by cruel hunters. After the hunters went away, she flew down and cried for her mate. Later, she picked a few blood-stained feathers and sat on them, as if to hatch a chick that would be her dead mate.

How did the hunter handle the dead male bird?

The dead body was picked up hands and jaws and pushed into the coarse washing bag, just like dirty linen, suggesting their cruelty towards birds.

Questions And Answers Of Old Man At The Bridge (Extra Questions) ICSE Class 9,10 English Literature

Questions And Answers Of Old Man At The Bridge (Extra Questions) ICSE Class 9,10 English Literature

In this, you are going to go through Questions And Answers Of Old Man At The Bridge (Extra Questions) ICSE Class 9,10 English Literature. Understanding a text meticulously in its totality is very important for a learner for scoring better in the exam. Experts made ample to ensure a thorough explanation of extra questions and answers. Let us find Questions And Answers Of Old Man At The Bridge (Extra Questions) ICSE Class 9, 10 English Literature.

Questions And Answers Of Old Man At The Bridge

Extra Questions

1. Who was sitting by the side of the road? Why was he there?

 An old man wearing steel-rimmed spectacles, with black and dusty cloth was sitting by the side of the road. He had to leave his town because of the artillery fire. He was sitting there as he was not able to walk further,  he had already walked a lot and it was too much for his age. He was also mentally tired.

2. Describe the physical appearance of the man. What was his occupation? How was his occupation interrupted?

The old man sitting by the side of the road was wearing steel-rimmed spectacles. His clothes were black and dusty and his face had turned grey from dust. The old man looked after his animals in San Carlos. The artillery fire has interrupted his business of taking care of his animals, he had to run leaving them alone.

3. What is a pontoon bridge? Why are the people crossing the bridge?

A pontoon bridge is a temporary bridge using floats or shallow-draft boats used in wartime and civil emergencies. People were using the bridge to quickly cross over the river before the Fascist army opened fire. They were running to save their life as it was considered to be
the war zone.

4. What was the narrator doing in the bridge?

The narrator, says that his mission is to cross the bridge and find out how far the enemy has advanced, does so, and finds the old man who was sitting by the bridge when he crossed toward the enemy still sitting there when he crosses back. So, he stopped to talk to the man, know his difficulties and ask to help him to move to a safer place.

5. Where is the old man from? Why did he have pleasure in mentioning his native town?

The old man in the story “Old Man at the Bridge” is from San Carlos. The old man takes pleasure in mentioning the name of his native town San Carlos because he loves his native land, his birthplace.

6. What forced the old man to leave his hometown?

The old man had to leave his town due to the incoming artillery attack during the Spanish Civil War. The old man lived in San Carlos, his town was under attack and so he was forced to leave the place. The old man was told by the army captain to leave the place as soon as possible to save his life.

7. What was the old man doing on the bridge?

The old man was sitting by the side of the road. He had to leave his town because of the artillery fire. He was sitting there as he was not able to walk further,  he had already walked a lot and it was too much for his age. He was not able to cross the bridge as he was guilty of leaving his animals alone. The separation was very tough for him, he felt like he had no reason to live.

8. Why wasn’t the bridge a good place to hold on?

The bridge was not a good place to hold as it was considered to be the war zone. Everyone was crossing the bridge quickly to cross over the river before the Fascist army opened fire. They were running to save their life. So, the narrator asked the old man to move from that place and take a hold in a safer place.

9. Where did the narrator want the old man to go?

The old man was taking rest by the side of the road. As it was not safe, the narrator advised the old man to cross the bridge and catch a truck towards Barcelona. He asked him to run to save his life and take a hold in a safer place. But the old man replied that he did not know anyone there. However, he thanked the narrator for his suggestion.

10. What animals did the old man own? Discuss his relationship with the animals.

The old man had two goats, a cat and four pairs of pigeons. He had no family, the animals were his family. He used to look after them in San
Carlos. He loved them a lot. The war-separated him from his animals, the separation was very tough for him, he felt like he had no reason to live, he felt lonely

11. What did the old man do with the animals and why?

The old man owns many animals. His business was to look after them but reluctantly he had to leave them alone. The artillery, the heavy firing from the enemy forced him to leave the animals behind in his native town San Carlos.

12. What did the old man say about the birds and the goats he owns?

The old man says that he is not worried about the birds as he has left the cafe open, they would fly. He was actually worried about the goats as they would come under artillery fire as they would not be able to escape.

13. What did the old man say about politics? Why did he mention his age?

The old man meant to say when he states, that he is without politics is that he did not support in any side of the war. He mentioned his age to the soldier to tell him that he was too old to do these political things and so he will only take care of his animals. He also says that he had walked more than he could in that age and so now he was tired.

14. What was the narrator’s attitude after talking to the old man?

The narrator initially has a concern that the old man is not moving in light of an enemy attack. The narrator suggests him away to an alternate destination. He tries to assure the old man that the doves will be fine since he unlocked the cage. He also allowed the man to rest   then urged him to move. He was filled with pity when he realized that there was nothing to do with the old man.

15. What does the narrator notice while returning?

The narrator notices the old man when he crosses the bridge to reconnoitre howclose the enemies were. He finds him still sitting in the same place when he returns, in spite of advising him to leave that place as it was not safe. The enemies were approaching, everyone was busy escaping, but the old man was immobile, he was busy in his own world of thoughts.

16.’There was nothing to do about him’. Discuss

The line ‘There was nothing to do about him’ signifies that the narrator was not able to help the old man, as he was not able to walk further, as he had already walked a lot and it was too much for his age. This signifies that the old man was left in the hands of fate. Displaced and alone, he was faced with the inevitability of death. By depicting this wretched condition of the old man, the writer draws our sympathy for the old man

17. Compare the character of the old man and the narrator.

The old man is presented from the narrator’s perspective. He was presented to be lonely. He has to leave this place because the captain told him to leave the town because of the artillery. He had to leave all his animals and was very guilty for that and so he couldn’t cross the bridge.

The unnamed narrator is an active character in the short story. The narrator is the soldier who comes in contact with an old man at the bridge. The soldier is a scout whose duty is to cross the bridge and find how far the enemy has advanced he engages himself in the conversation with the old man. He tried to help the old man.

18. Discuss the conflict between the man and his inner self.

The conflict between the man and inner self is seen in the old man. He was the owner of few animals whom he has left alone due to the artillery and he was really guilty for doing so. He was struggling with his inner self as he has realized that he has not done justice with the animals. He was supposed to protect them.

19. What does the bridge symbolize in the story?

The bridge in the story symbolizes the point of no return for the old man. If he crosses the bridge he may protect himself physically but not mentally, he would have left all his love in Carlos. But if he stays he would be able to share the fate of his animals.

20. What was the reason behind the old man’s guilt?

The old man believed that he must have taken care of the cat, the goats, and the pigeons in San Carlos. He had to leave them alone due to the war. The man was guilty as he was not able to fulfill his responsibilities. He kept wondering what would his animals do in his absence.

21. Why was the old man found to be helpless? What did the narrator do to make him feel better?

The old man loved his animals a lot. The separation from them was very tough for him. He left like he has lost the reasons to live.

The narrator tries to engage him in a conversation. He assures the old man that his animals would be fine. He gave his best to relieve him of his worries but unfortunately, he failed. The old man has already surrendered to his fate.

Questions And Answers

What is the summary of the old man at the bridge?

The story ‘Old Man at the Bridge’ deals with the themes of resignation, depression and impending death. This theme is reflected in a conversation between a soldier and an old man who had to leave his hometown during the Spanish Civil War. The old man is gripped by panic and anxiety.

What kind of story is the old man at the bridge?

This very short and simple story is a powerful depiction of how war affects the lives of common people who are “without politics”. The old man has nothing to do with the impending war. But still, he had to leave his home and his beloved pets whom he regards as his family.

What happened to the old man at the bridge?

When the narrator urges the old man to try to walk until he can catch a truck that could carry him away, the old man can only fall back down, repeating, “I was taking care of animals.” The narrator concludes that he cannot help the old man, and presumably leaves him to die there.

What was the old man at the bridge guilty about?

The old man is guilty of leaving his animals behind for the fear of fire by the artillery. … Yes, it seemed that the old man had given up on his life: He was not concerned for his safety. He sat by the side of the road at a pontoon bridge in the war zone.

What message does Old Man at the Bridge convey?

“The Old Man at the Bridge” by Ernest Hemingway is the tragedy of war. The author’s intention is to illustrate the way wars disrupt the lives of innocent people who are caught up in the middle, but also the way it frustrates those who cannot do anything about it (0bservers and foreigners).

Why was the old man last one to cross the bridge?

The old man was the last to leave because he was taking care of his animals. The old man wore dusty clothes and steel rimmed spectacles. His face was grey and dusty.

What did the old man tell the speaker about himself?

The old man told the narrator that he had neither family nor he was into politics. He was 76 years old and had travelled 12 kilometres on foot because of which his energy had been drained and he could move no more.

Why did the old man feel dull and sad?

The old man feels dull and sad because he is leaving behind his family and animals while fleeing during the Spanish Civil War. Worried about their fates, he does not know how they will survive.

What happened to the old man at the end of the story?

The old man’s at the stage in life where he’s effectively given up the ghost and so has nothing to live for. If he isn’t killed by the fascists scheduled to arrive at any moment, then the chances are that he’ll take his own life.

Why does the old man sit at the bridge without moving?

the old man is sitting at the pontoon bridge without moving as he was tired of walking twelve kilometres from his home town, and he also didn’t wanted to move as the thirst of living in him died as his animals were his life and he had to leave them.

Line By Line Analysis Of The Poem Geography Lesson CBSE English Class 8

Line By Line Analysis Of The Poem Geography Lesson CBSE English Class 8

In this, you are going to go through Line By Line Analysis Of The Poem Geography Lesson CBSE English Class 8. Understanding a text meticulously in its totality is very important for a learner for scoring better in the CBSE English exam. Experts made ample to ensure a thorough critical and line-by-line analysis. Let us find Line By Line Analysis Of The Poem Geography Lesson CBSE English Class 8.

Line By Line Analysis Of The Poem Geography Lesson

About the Poet:

Zulfikar Ghose was born in 1935 on March 23. He was born in Sialkot, Punjab, British India. He is a poet and novelist and lives in Texas. His arena of work is mainly “magical realism”. This concept is formed from a blend of harsh reality and fantasy elements. The poet was born to a business Khwaja Mohammed Ghose, who moved to Mumbai, India along with the whole family during the Second World War in 1942. Ghosh also taught in the University of Texas, Austin.

“The Violent West, A Memory of Asia and Selected Poems” is his collection of poetry. Some of his notables works include: “Statement Against Corpses” (1964), “Crump’s Terms” (1975), “A New History of Torments” (1982), “Veronica and the Góngora Passion: Stories, Fictions, Tales and One Fable” (1998), “The Fiction of Reality” (1983), “Geography Lesson” (1969), “Decomposition” (2015) and a lot more.

About the Poem:

The poem has used the subject Geography not to give us a lesson on the subject per se, but if we study the poem well, we would understand the true essence of the poem. It is ore about the oneness and unity of the earth and the way it was created by God as one unit. We, humans, divided it into cities and countries for our own settlements.

Structure of the Poem:

“When the jet sprang into the sky,
it was clear why the city
had developed the way it had,
seeing it scaled six inches to the mile.
There seemed an inevitability
about what on ground had looked haphazard,
unplanned and without style
When the jet sprang into the sky.

When the jet reached ten thousand feet,
it was clear why the country
had cities where the rivers ran
and why the valleys were populated.
The logic of geography —
that land and water attracted man —
was clearly delineated
When the jet reached ten thousand feet.

When the jet rose six miles high,
it was clear the earth was round
and that it had more sea than land.

But it was difficult to understand
that the men on the earth found
causes to hate each other, to build
walls across cities and to kill.
From that height, it was not clear why.”

There is no specific rhyming pattern.

Line by line analysis of the Poem:

Lines 1- 4:

“When the jet sprang into the sky,
it was clear why the city
had developed the way it had,
seeing it scaled six inches to the mile.”

The poet says in the first stanza that it becomes clear when the jet flies above as to why the earth has become the way it is now. The cities are unplanned and there are walls and boundaries all over.

Lines 5- 8:

“There seemed an inevitability
about what on ground had looked haphazard,
unplanned and without style
When the jet sprang into the sky.”

The places where humans have inhabited have been built haphazardly without a proper plan and style. The poet could realise this from up above the sky from the jet that was flying so high.

Lines 9- 12:

“When the jet reached ten thousand feet,
it was clear why the country
had cities where the rivers ran
and why the valleys were populated.”

The areas which are habitable become more describable When the jet reaches an altitude of ten thousand feet. The valleys and countries and cities become more prominent. The poet saw that there are unplanned cities instead of free-flowing rivers.

Lines 13- 16:

“The logic of geography —
that land and water attracted man —
was clearly delineated
When the jet reached ten thousand feet.”

When the jet reaches the altitude of ten thousand feet, the physical features of the earth that had attracted men, becomes clear.

Lines 17- 19:

“When the jet rose six miles high,
it was clear the earth was round
and that it had more sea than land.”

The poet could understand that the earth was spherical with no boundaries from such a height. The oneness of the earth has been portrayed through its spherical nature. Also, there are more water bodies than land. The poet has mentioned this because technically it is impossible to divide water, although there are maritime divisions.

Lines 20- 24:

“But it was difficult to understand
that the men on the earth found
causes to hate each other, to build
walls across cities and to kill.
From that height, it was not clear why.”

In the last stanza, the poet is saying that he is unclear of the reason as to why humans living on earth hate each other and want to kill each other. The poet is clueless as to why there are so much hatred and mercilessness in humanity. He also questions why humans build walls and want to get divided. Even from such a height, from a bird’s view, it is unclear to the poet.

Figures of speech used in the Poem:

Alliteration:
This is a figure of speech where closely associated words or corresponding words begin with the same alphabet in a sentence.

“seeing it scaled six inches to the mile.”

“it was clear why the country

had cities where the rivers ran

Important Word Meanings:

Inevitable: Something that cannot be avoided.

Haphazard: Chaotic/ Without a proper plan.

Delineated: Described.

The Theme of the Poem:

God has created the earth has one unit. We have made physical divisions including cities and countries. We have built boundaries and walls. The poet has used the subject Geography to describe how the planet was built in a way and how we have transformed it into something else. But in the end, the poet is still clueless about the wars and hatred that we feel for one another.

Questions And Answers

What is the poem geography lesson about?

The poem Geography Lesson describes the poet’s opinion of the land below when viewed from the sky. He finds the earth the least attractive from above and continues going higher up. As the poet moves higher, he realizes that the country is full of cities and valleys.

What is the theme of the poem geography?

The poem is about the way earth looks from different altitudes. It is divided into three parts. When the jet takes off and starts to climb up in the sky, you can have full height view of the city. The city grew as per its necessity and did not grow as per proper planning.

What are the poetic devices used in the poem geography lesson?

The poet mainly uses imagery and alliteration in the poem.

Chief Seattle’s Speech Questions And Answers (Extra Questions) ICSE Class 9, 10 English Literature

Chief Seattle’s Speech Questions And Answers (Extra Questions) ICSE Class 9, 10 English Literature

In this, you are going to go through Chief Seattle’s Speech Questions And Answers (Extra Questions) ICSE Class 9, 10 English Literature. Understanding a text meticulously in its totality is very important for a learner for scoring better in the ICSE Class 9, 10 English exam. Experts made ample to ensure a thorough explanation of extra questions and answers. Let us find Chief Seattle’s Speech Questions And Answers (Extra Questions) ICSE Class 9, 10 English Literature.

Chief Seattle's Speech Questions And Answers

Extra Questions

1. Who is chief Seattle? What was his speech about?

Chief Seattle is a Native American chief, a member of the Squamish tribe, and a prominent figure among his people. In his speech, he argues for his oppressed people due to the white men. This argues for their right, land right. He shows great concern over the degradation of nature. He also warns against the rapid progress of the white people and the decay of the red men.

2. How did Seattle express his concern over environmental degradation?

Seattle expresses his concern over environmental degradation and its impact on humans. Nature has provided every necessary things to live. He says that the white men want to buy their land, who have no respect for nature. They write their religion on a stone so that people remember them throughout. He fears that in future people will be facing a huge problem if they don’t respect the environment.

3. Who is a great chief at Washington? What has he sent to the natives?

The great chief at Washington is George Washington, the first president of the USA. The White Chief had arrived with the proposal and the message of friendship from the Big Chief. They offered the natives their goodwill and friendship, whereas it was known that they have no need for their friendship.

4. How did Seattle compare the number of the white chief to that of the red men?

Seattle says that there was a time when his people were large in number now they are nothing more than a mournful memory. He compares the Whites to the grass that covers the vast prairies, large in number, they are powerful in number whereas his people are few and they resemble the scattering trees of a storm-swept plain.

5. What was the main motive for sending the greetings?

The White Chief had arrived with the proposal and the message of friendship from the Big Chief. They offered the natives their goodwill and friendship. The Big Chief wishes to buy the land of the Native Americans. The natives have to surrender their land to the white men and have to leave their ancestors land.

6. How did the Seattle react to the greetings sent by the Big Chief?

The Big Chief wishes to buy the land of the Native Americans. He promises to do many things if they surrender. Seattle says that the proposition seems to be just, kind, and generous as the Redman no longer has rights. The offer appears to be wise but they don’t need their friendship in actuality. Being less in number the Native Americans had to listen to them.

7. What was the no. Of his people earlier as said by Seattle?

Seattle being concerned about nature and his people exclaims in sorrow that now there are a handful of people but once there was a time in the past when his people were numerous in number. They covered the land as the waves of a wind-ruffled sea covered its shell.

8. What do Seattle mean by ‘Youth is impulsive’

Seattle in his speech says that the youth is impulsive, referring to the young one of his races. The red men when grew angry, they paint their faces black with paint which denotes that their heart was not good. Their hearts were cruel and relentless, the old men and the old women were unable to restain them.

9. When did enmity between the red men and the white men begin?

As said by Seattle in his speech the enmity between the red men and the white men began when the white forced the tribals to leave their land. They occupied their land, the land of the ancestor’s and forced them to move westward. But he never wanted the enmity to return back as they have nothing to gain but had got many things to lose.

10. Who are Haidas and Tsinshians?

Haidas were the Indigenous people of North America and Tsinshians were the North American people of the northwest coast. As said by Seattle in his speech they both were the old outside enemies of the natives who ceases to frighten them.

11. What condition does Good Father give to protect the native people?

The white settlers wanted to buy their native lands and promised to allow them enough to live comfortably. The natives had to accept the offer if they want him to give them protection from their ancient enemies. He made them sure that he will always protect the tribe. He will provide them with all they need to live happily. They would also be allowed to visit the tombs of their ancestors.

12. How does Seattle differentiate tribal people from that of the white people?

Seattle in his speech says that there was a time when his people were large in number but now they are nothing more than a mournful memory. He says although his people might die first but even the white men won’t be spared. Everyone will need to die with a similar Destiny only the difference is one might face earlier.

13. How does Seattle bring the difference between the religion of the white man and the red man?

The white men follow Christianity which was written upon stones so that people remember them throughout their life. Their religion was considered to be somewhat artificial and mechanical by Chief Seattle, as they have no respect for the environment and also for their ancestors. The the religion of the tribal people was the tradition of their ancestors. Their ancestors were buried in the land. It was their sacred ground. They visit their resting ground to show respect for them.

14. How are the natives dependent on their ancestors?

The religion of the natives has been the traditions of their ancestors. They believe that the souls of their ancestors remain in the magnificent mountains, murmuring rivers, deep valleys, and always walk with them. They visit their resting ground, the burial place of their ancestors to show respect for them.

15. Why do the dead of tribal never forget them of this world?

The death of the native red Indians never forgets them of the world and the things given to them. They still love its verdant valley, murmuring river, magnificent mountain, sequestered vales and verdant lined lakes and bays and always yearn in tender fond affection over the lonely hearted living. They keep visiting the burial place to guide, console and comfort.

16. How is God of red men different from that of white men?

The God of both the races were different. The God of the White men loves them and hates the Redmen. He loves the white people, protects them with His loving arms. The native god was with them when they were strong, abundant, and flourishing, but now when they are in need hope so even the native god has forsaken them. They are making the red men stronger. As if everything was fair to the whites and nothing to the red.

17. Compare the past days of Chief Seattle’s people to the upcoming doom days according to Seattle.

According to Seattle the situation when his people were in their glorious phase to the wave of a wind-ruffled sea which has now come to the edge of doom. He states how the glowing days of the natives have come to decay just like the tide, going back from the shore which has no hope to return. Once there was a time when his people were large in number now they are nothing more than a mournful memory.

18. Where was the religion of the white people written?

White people’s belonged to the religion ‘Christianity’. The religion of the white people i.e. Christianity was written upon stones so that people remember them throughout their life. Their religion was considered to be somewhat artificial and mechanical by Chief Seattle, as they have no respect for the environment and also for their ancestors. Their religion was not somewhere felt by heart, it was considered to be fake.

19. How are the natives compared to the waves of seas?

The two comparisons Seattle’s has made in his speech states the present situation and the past situation of the native people. He states the situation when his people were in their glorious phase to the wave of a wind-ruffled sea which has now come to the edge of doom. He states how the glowing days of the natives have come to decay just like the tide, going back from the shore which has no hope to return.

20. What is the condition laid by the speaker before he accepts the Big chief’s proposition?

Seattle says that he will be accepting the proposition sent by the Big chief if he won’t deny the privilege of visiting the burial place of their ancestors, friends, and children. It was their sacred ground. They visit their resting ground to show respect for them.

21. How can you say that the red Indians were attached to their land?

Seattle’s speech shows the importance of the land to the red Indians. For them, it was not only a piece of earth but a symbol of their culture and memories. It was the burial place of their ancestors, the land was sacred to them. Not only the living ones but also the dead ones love their land.

22. According to Seattle what will unite both the red man and the white man?

According to Seattle, the common destiny was death. He says only death can unite both races. The death may differ but everyone who is born here will have to die someday or the other. Both the red men and the white men will share the same destiny as an order of nature, everything will decay today or tomorrow.

23. How were the natives oppressed by the white man?

Seattle’s speech shows how his people were oppressed due to the white man’s. The white men were colonizing them. They were so powerful in number that the red men were forced to work according to them. The Natives were in a fear that who had no respect for nature, their ancestors, how will they allow them to live comfortably after buying the land.

Line By Line Analysis of Fable by Ralph Waldo Emerson West Bengal Board Class 10th English

Line By Line Analysis of Fable by Ralph Waldo Emerson

West Bengal Board Class 10th English

In this, you are going to go through Line By Line Analysis of Fable by Ralph Waldo Emerson Class 10th English. Understanding a text meticulously in its totality is very important for a learner for scoring better in the West Bengal Board Class 10 English exam. Experts made ample to ensure a thorough critical and line-by-line analysis. Let us find Line By Line Analysis of Fable by Ralph Waldo Emerson Class 10th English.

Line By Line Analysis of Fable by Ralph Waldo Emerson

About the Poet:

Ralph Emerson was a popular American writer, poet and philosopher as well during the nineteenth century. The poet was conceived in Boston, Massachusetts on 25th May 1803. He was mostly raised by his mom. The poet started composing verse in the wake of moving to St. Augustine in Florida. He went to the Boston Latin School and later moved on from a Harvard University in 1821. In 1826, he got a license to be the priest and joined as one in the Unitarian Church in 1829. He began accepting the convictions and thoughts of transcendentalism in 1832.

He gave heaps of talks on subjects identified with the theory of history in Boston. The principal paper distributed was “Nature”. Emerson distributed his second book in the year 1841 that was named “Articles”. This book incorporated his renowned paper “Independence”. He was considered as one of the most “liberal-democratic” masterminds of his time. A portion of his exceptionally unmistakable distributions incorporates “Essays: First Series” (1841), “Essays: Second Series” (1844), “Poems” (1847), “The Conduct of Life” (1860), and so on. He additionally composed poems like “Fable”, “Uriel”, “Brahma” and essays like “Politics”, “The Poet”, “New England Reformers” and the rundown goes on.

Emerson died in 1882 on April 27 at 78 years old years in Concord, Massachusetts.

About the Poem:

The poem “Fable” written by Ralph Emerson is an example of a short poem with a great message that is being portrayed in a very simple manner. The poem has very elegantly sent an important message. Every creation of nature has a significant role to play, the poem starts with an argument between the mountain and a squirrel about the importance of the squirrel in nature. The poem explains how one should never undervalue oneself. One should also, never look down upon someone else.

Every individual has their own importance and without them, there might be an imbalance in the whole system.

“All is well and wisely put”

This explains how every individual and every other creation of nature is useful and nothing is pointless. All of us have been created for some purpose. We have been made in such a way that we are interdependent on each other; we cannot survive completely on our own. Talents always differ. Everybody is good at something or the other and should never be judged only based on their shortcomings. Most of the content is comprised of the squirrel doing what it can to persuade the mountain it is deserving of living there, despite the fact that it is smaller.

Structure of the Poem:

“The mountain and the squirrel
Had a quarrel;
And the former called the latter ‘Little Prig.’
Bun replied,
‘You are doubtless very big;
But all sorts of things and weather
Must be taken in together,
To make up a year
And a sphere.
And I think it no disgrace
To occupy my place.
If I’m not so large as you,
You are not so small as I,
And not half so spry.
I’ll not deny you make
A very pretty squirrel track;
Talents differ; all is well and wisely put;
If I cannot carry forests on my back,
Neither can you crack a nut.’”

The poem “Fable” has 19 lines and has a rhyming scheme of “AABCBDDEEFFGHHIJKJK”. It is clear that not all of the lines of the poem rhyme with each other, also there is no consistent rhyming pattern. This is Emerson’s approach to put significance on a line and change the rhyme in order to change the feeling. The title of the poem does justice to the content of the poem. A fable is an idyllic story created in verse or prose with a good summarized toward the end. Normally animals are utilized as characters to portray a significant message. In this poem, a squirrel and an inanimate object (mountain) have been used to explain the lesson.

Line by Line Analysis of the Poem:

Lines 1-3:

“The mountain and the squirrel
Had a quarrel;
And the former called the latter ‘Little Prig.’”

The speaker starts by expressing the primary content of the piece in the very first stanza. There is a mountain and a squirrel and they got into a battle or something to that effect. A reader ought to quickly see that Emerson utilized the world “quarrel” to depict the casual fight. This makes it appear to be less genuine and serious at that point. It is a brief vexed to their typically even relationship. Both of these characters have been vigorously personified, to such an extent they can address each other and decipher unwanted activities. The decision to organize the lines as such and amaze the reader with the hard “g” consonant gives further accentuation to the insult.

Lines 4-9:

“Bun replied,
‘You are doubtless very big;
But all sorts of things and weather
Must be taken in together,
To make up a year
And a sphere.”

In the fourth line, the speaker addresses the squirrel as “Bun”. It is answering to the mountain in an exceptionally clear and articulate manner. He chooses his words cautiously. The squirrel begins by recognizing that the mountain is “very big”. It has a reality the squirrel can’t deny. The squirrel is endeavouring to make peace and deal with the way that they won’t generally get along. One can’t like to live in harmony with each kind of being, conscious or not.

These articles, animals, and individuals all “make up a year/And a sphere.” The world is developed of the great and the awful, both are similarly vital for life to go on.

Lines 10-14:

“And I think it no disgrace
To occupy my place.
If I’m not so large as you,
You are not so small as I,
And not half so spry.”

In the above lines, the squirrel spreads out his contention. The premise of the fight is additionally uncovered here. He doesn’t see anything amiss with his possession of one “place” on the mountain. Similarly, as the mountain is huge, with an enormous task to carry out, the squirrel is little with an equivalent task to carry out. Both must exist at a time. So as to deal with the mountain the squirrel spreads out their individual favourable circumstances and burdens. Initially, the mountain is a lot bigger than he is—something he acknowledges as reality. Yet, the squirrel is considerably more “spry”.

Lines 15-19:

“I’ll not deny you make
A very pretty squirrel track;
Talents differ; all is well and wisely put;
If I cannot carry forests on my back,
Neither can you crack a nut.’”

He proceeds on a similar track in the following arrangement of lines. The squirrel is endeavouring to assuage the mountain while likewise indicating his own advantages. They are rises to on the planet if not in size, speed and capacities.

First, he praises the mountain. This is another marginally underhanded compliment as the mountain is supposed to be a “pretty squirrel track.” The mountain is delightful and an ideal spot for a squirrel to meander. He concedes their gifts are extraordinary. The mountain can convey woodlands on its back yet it can’t “crack a nut.” There is something about its powerlessness to finish such a basic assignment, that loans the completion of the sonnet a not exactly sympathetic tone. It is clear the squirrel despite everything holds resentment against the mountain for its endeavour to drive the squirrel from its back.

Figures of Speech Used in the Poem:

Personification
Personification is a figure of speech in which animals or other inanimate objects are credited with human feelings, emotions and abilities.
The whole poem has been personified in away. Animals (squirrel) and inanimate objects (mountains) have been personified in order to display the main content of the poem. The whole poem is a dialogue between the mountain and the squirrel.

Litotes
It is a figure of speech where the affirmative is articulated by negating its contrary.
“And I think it no disgrace”.
“If I’m not so large as you”.
“You are not so small as I”.

Important Word Meanings

Spry: Agile.
Squirrel track: Symbolism for resourcefulness.

The Theme of the Poem

The primary theme of the poem is to accept one’s shortcomings and not judge anybody else. One should know that every individual has a role to play in nature. It is necessary to follow this to have a healthy mindset in today’s date. Everybody should be happy with what gifts they received with and embrace their flaws (just like the little squirrel in the poem).

The poem has very simply expressed the importance of self-love and how we should never look down upon someone else.

Questions And Answers

What is the moral lesson of Emerson’s fable?

Fable” is a poem written by Ralph Waldo Emerson. A “fable” is a short tale to teach a lesson. A “prig” is someone who is self-righteous. In this tale, Emerson tells us to not judge others and try to understand that people unlike us also have qualities that we don’t have.

What is fable by Ralph Waldo Emerson about?

Emerson tells us to not judge others and try to understand that people unlike us also have qualities that we don’t have. For example, the mountain may be able to carry forests on his back but he can’t crack a nut like a squirrel.

What kind of poem is fable?

A fable is a poetic story composed in verse or prose with a moral summed up at the end. Usually using animals as characters to teach a valuable lesson. The most commonly found example of fables are Aesop’s Fables, but here are two poetic examples.

The Merchant Of Venice Act 2 Scene 2 ICSE X English Literature

The Merchant Of Venice Act 2 Scene 2 ICSE X English Literature

In this, you are going to go through The Merchant Of Venice Act 2 Scene 2 ICSE X English Literature. Understanding a text meticulously in its totality is very important for a learner for scoring better in the ICSE Class 10 English exam. Experts made ample to ensure a thorough critical and line-by-line analysis. Let us find The Merchant Of Venice Act 2 Scene 2 ICSE X English Literature.

The Merchant Of Venice Act 2 Scene 2

Scene II Venice. A street.

Enter Launcelot

Launcelot

Certainly my conscience will serve me to run from
this Jew my master. The fiend is at mine elbow and
tempts me saying to me ‘Gobbo, Launcelot Gobbo, good
Launcelot,’ or ‘good Gobbo,’ or good Launcelot
Gobbo, use your legs, take the start, run away. My
conscience says ‘No; take heed,’ honest Launcelot;
take heed, honest Gobbo, or, as aforesaid, ‘honest
Launcelot Gobbo; do not run; scorn running with thy
heels.’ Well, the most courageous fiend bids me
pack: ‘Via!’ says the fiend; ‘away!’ says the
fiend; ‘for the heavens, rouse up a brave mind,’
says the fiend, ‘and run.’ Well, my conscience,
hanging about the neck of my heart, says very wisely
to me ‘My honest friend Launcelot, being an honest
man’s son,’ or rather an honest woman’s son; for,
indeed, my father did something smack, something
grow to, he had a kind of taste; well, my conscience
says ‘Launcelot, budge not.’ ‘Budge,’ says the
fiend. ‘Budge not,’ says my conscience.
‘Conscience,’ say I, ‘you counsel well;’ ‘ Fiend,’
say I, ‘you counsel well:’ to be ruled by my
conscience, I should stay with the Jew my master,
who, God bless the mark, is a kind of devil; and, to
run away from the Jew, I should be ruled by the
fiend, who, saving your reverence, is the devil
himself. Certainly the Jew is the very devil
incarnal; and, in my conscience, my conscience is
but a kind of hard conscience, to offer to counsel
me to stay with the Jew. The fiend gives the more
friendly counsel: I will run, fiend; my heels are
at your command; I will run.

Enter Old Gobbo, with a basket

Gobbo

Master young man, you, I pray you, which is the way
to master Jew’s?

Launcelot

[Aside] O heavens, this is my true-begotten father!
who, being more than sand-blind, high-gravel blind,
knows me not: I will try confusions with him.

Gobbo

Master young gentleman, I pray you, which is the way
to master Jew’s?

Launcelot

Turn up on your right hand at the next turning, but,
at the next turning of all, on your left; marry, at
the very next turning, turn of no hand, but turn
down indirectly to the Jew’s house.

Gobbo

By God’s sonties, ’twill be a hard way to hit. Can
you tell me whether one Launcelot,
that dwells with him, dwell with him or no?

Launcelot

Talk you of young Master Launcelot?
Aside
Mark me now; now will I raise the waters. Talk you
of young Master Launcelot?

Gobbo

No master, sir, but a poor man’s son: his father,
though I say it, is an honest exceeding poor man
and, God be thanked, well to live.

Launcelot

Well, let his father be what a’ will, we talk of
young Master Launcelot.

Gobbo

Your worship’s friend and Launcelot, sir.

Launcelot

But I pray you, ergo, old man, ergo, I beseech you,
talk you of young Master Launcelot?

Gobbo

Of Launcelot, an’t please your mastership.

Launcelot

Ergo, Master Launcelot. Talk not of Master
Launcelot, father; for the young gentleman,
according to Fates and Destinies and such odd
sayings, the Sisters Three and such branches of
learning, is indeed deceased, or, as you would say
in plain terms, gone to heaven.

Gobbo

Marry, God forbid! the boy was the very staff of my
age, my very prop.

Launcelot

Do I look like a cudgel or a hovel-post, a staff or
a prop? Do you know me, father?

Gobbo

Alack the day, I know you not, young gentleman:
but, I pray you, tell me, is my boy, God rest his
soul, alive or dead?

Launcelot

Do you not know me, father?

Gobbo

Alack, sir, I am sand-blind; I know you not.

Launcelot

Nay, indeed, if you had your eyes, you might fail of
the knowing me: it is a wise father that knows his
own child. Well, old man, I will tell you news of
your son: give me your blessing: truth will come
to light; murder cannot be hid long; a man’s son
may, but at the length truth will out.

Gobbo

Pray you, sir, stand up: I am sure you are not
Launcelot, my boy.

Launcelot

Pray you, let’s have no more fooling about it, but
give me your blessing: I am Launcelot, your boy
that was, your son that is, your child that shall
be.

Gobbo

I cannot think you are my son.

Launcelot

I know not what I shall think of that: but I am
Launcelot, the Jew’s man, and I am sure Margery your
wife is my mother.

Gobbo

Her name is Margery, indeed: I’ll be sworn, if thou
be Launcelot, thou art mine own flesh and blood.
Lord worshipped might he be! what a beard hast thou
got! thou hast got more hair on thy chin than
Dobbin my fill-horse has on his tail.

Launcelot

It should seem, then, that Dobbin’s tail grows
backward: I am sure he had more hair of his tail
than I have of my face when I last saw him.

Gobbo

Lord, how art thou changed! How dost thou and thy
master agree? I have brought him a present. How
‘gree you now?

Launcelot

Well, well: but, for mine own part, as I have set
up my rest to run away, so I will not rest till I
have run some ground. My master’s a very Jew: give
him a present! give him a halter: I am famished in
his service; you may tell every finger I have with
my ribs. Father, I am glad you are come: give me
your present to one Master Bassanio, who, indeed,
gives rare new liveries: if I serve not him, I
will run as far as God has any ground. O rare
fortune! here comes the man: to him, father; for I
am a Jew, if I serve the Jew any longer

Enter Bassanio, with Leonardo and other followers

Bassanio

You may do so; but let it be so hasted that supper
be ready at the farthest by five of the clock. See
these letters delivered; put the liveries to making,
and desire Gratiano to come anon to my lodging.
Exit a Servant

Launcelot

To him, father.

Gobbo

God bless your worship!

Bassanio

Gramercy! wouldst thou aught with me?

Gobbo

Here’s my son, sir, a poor boy,–

Launcelot

Not a poor boy, sir, but the rich Jew’s man; that
would, sir, as my father shall specify–

Gobbo

He hath a great infection, sir, as one would say, to serve–

Launcelot

Indeed, the short and the long is, I serve the Jew,
and have a desire, as my father shall specify–

Gobbo

His master and he, saving your worship’s reverence,
are scarce cater-cousins–

Launcelot

To be brief, the very truth is that the Jew, having
done me wrong, doth cause me, as my father, being, I
hope, an old man, shall frutify unto you–

Gobbo

I have here a dish of doves that I would bestow upon
your worship, and my suit is–

Launcelot

In very brief, the suit is impertinent to myself, as
your worship shall know by this honest old man; and,
though I say it, though old man, yet poor man, my father.

Bassanio

One speak for both. What would you?

Launcelot

Serve you, sir.

Gobbo

That is the very defect of the matter, sir.

Bassanio

I know thee well; thou hast obtain’d thy suit:
Shylock thy master spoke with me this day,
And hath preferr’d thee, if it be preferment
To leave a rich Jew’s service, to become
The follower of so poor a gentleman.

Launcelot

The old proverb is very well parted between my
master Shylock and you, sir: you have the grace of
God, sir, and he hath enough.

Bassanio

Thou speak’st it well. Go, father, with thy son.
Take leave of thy old master and inquire
My lodging out. Give him a livery
More guarded than his fellows’: see it done.

Launcelot

Father, in. I cannot get a service, no; I have
ne’er a tongue in my head. Well, if any man in
Italy have a fairer table which doth offer to swear
upon a book, I shall have good fortune. Go to,
here’s a simple line of life: here’s a small trifle
of wives: alas, fifteen wives is nothing! eleven
widows and nine maids is a simple coming-in for one
man: and then to ‘scape drowning thrice, and to be
in peril of my life with the edge of a feather-bed;
here are simple scapes. Well, if Fortune be a
woman, she’s a good wench for this gear. Father,
come; I’ll take my leave of the Jew in the twinkling of an eye.
Exeunt Launcelot and Old Gobbo

Bassanio

I pray thee, good Leonardo, think on this:
These things being bought and orderly bestow’d,
Return in haste, for I do feast to-night
My best-esteem’d acquaintance: hie thee, go.

Leonardo

My best endeavours shall be done herein.

Enter Gratiano

Gratiano

Where is your master?

Leonardo

Yonder, sir, he walks.

Exit

Gratiano

Signior Bassanio!

Bassanio

Gratiano!

Gratiano

I have a suit to you.

Bassanio

You have obtain’d it.

Gratiano

You must not deny me: I must go with you to Belmont.

Bassanio

Why then you must. But hear thee, Gratiano;
Thou art too wild, too rude and bold of voice;
Parts that become thee happily enough
And in such eyes as ours appear not faults;
But where thou art not known, why, there they show
Something too liberal. Pray thee, take pain
To allay with some cold drops of modesty
Thy skipping spirit, lest through thy wild behavior
I be misconstrued in the place I go to,
And lose my hopes.

Gratiano

Signior Bassanio, hear me:
If I do not put on a sober habit,
Talk with respect and swear but now and then,
Wear prayer-books in my pocket, look demurely,
Nay more, while grace is saying, hood mine eyes
Thus with my hat, and sigh and say ‘amen,’
Use all the observance of civility,
Like one well studied in a sad ostent
To please his grandam, never trust me more.

Bassanio

Well, we shall see your bearing.

Gratiano

Nay, but I bar tonight: you shall not gauge me
By what we do tonight.

Bassanio

No, that were pity:
I would entreat you rather to put on
Your boldest suit of mirth, for we have friends
That purpose merriment. But fare you well:
I have some business.

Gratiano

And I must to Lorenzo and the rest:
But we will visit you at supper-time.
Exeunt

Textbook Questions And Answers Of Our Runaway Kite By Lucy Maud Montgomery Class 10 West Bengal Board English

Textbook Questions And Answers Of Our Runaway Kite By Lucy Maud Montgomery Class 10 West Bengal Board English

In this, you are going to go through Textbook Questions And Answers Of Our Runaway Kite By Lucy Maud Montgomery Class 10 English. Understanding a text meticulously in its entirety is very important for a learner for scoring better in the West Bengal board exam. Experts made ample to ensure a thorough explanation of textbook questions and answers. Let us find Textbook Questions And Answers Of Our Runaway Kite By Lucy Maud Montgomery Class 10 English.

Textbook Questions And Answers Of Out Runaway Kite

Unit 1.

1. Choose the correct alternative to complete the following sentences:

a) The keeper of the Big Half Moon Lighthouse is

i) Aunt Ester

ii) Father

iii) Claude

iv) Dick

Answer:ii

b) The family moved over to the mainland in

i) summer

ii) spring

iii) monsoon

iv) winter

Answer: iv

c) When asked about relations, Father looked

i) happy

ii) angry

iii) sorrowful

iv) irritated

Answer: iv

2. Fill in the chart with information from the text.

a) Name of the island

-Big Half Moon

b) age of Claude

-Eleven years

c) the game played by Claude and the narrator

-Pirate caves

3. State whether the following sentences are True or False. Provide sentences phrases/words in support of your answer.

i) People felt that Claude and the narrator were lonesome

-True

S.S – “They said we must be lonesome over there, with no other children near us.”

ii) Claude and the narrator quarrelled

-false

S.S – “Claude and I never quarreled”

iii) Nobody on the mainland had relations

-false

S.S – “Everybody on the mainland had relations”

4. Choose the correct alternative to complete the following sentences:

a) In summer the Big Half Moon is always

i) lovely

ii) unpleasant

iii) boring

iv) dull

Answer: i

b) Back on the island, Claude and the narrator made plenty of

i) puppets

ii) masks

iii) kites

iv) envelopes

Answer: iii

c) the kite was patched with a

i) newspaper

ii) letter

iii) envelope

iv) card

Answer: letter

5. Complete the following sentences with information from the text:

i) A boy on the mainland showed Claude how to make kites.

ii) On the kite Claude pasted gold tinsel stars all over it and had written their names on it.

iii) Claude was standing with a bit of cord of the sailed away kite in his hand, looking foolish.

6. Fill in the chart with information from the text.

a) The narrator’s elbow went through the kite

When she was bringing the kite from the house, she tripped and fell over the rocks.

b) Claude and the narrator hurried to fix the kite.

They wanted to send the kite up before the wind had finished.

c) The kite soared.

The wind was glorious

7. Choose the correct alternative to complete the following sentences:

a) A letter came for father after a

i) day

ii) week

iii) fortnight

iv) month

Answer: iv

b) Father left home after quarrelling with his

i) brother

ii) sister

iii) aunt

iv) uncle

Answer: i

c) Dick and Mimi discovered the kite on the top of a

i) roof

ii) tree

iii) lighthouse

iv) light post

Answer: ii

8. Fill in the chart with information from the text.

a) Person who sent the letter

-Aunt Esther

b) name of Aunt Esther’s mother

-Philippa

c) the total number of family members in the narrator’s family at present

-Five

9. Answer the following questions:

a) What did father find when he went back home years afterwards?

— When he went back home years afterwards he found his brother had passed away and he couldn’t find his sister.

b) Where did Aunt Esther live?

–Aunt Esther lived hundred of miles away in Inland.

c) Why did Aunt Esther turn pale?

–Aunt Esther turned pale and surprised when he found the kite patched with the same letter she had written to her brother earlier.

10. Change the following sentences into questions, as directed:

a) Shankha lives in Alipurduar. (Information question using ‘ where’)

— Where does Shankha live?

b) They have gone to a picnic. (Interrogative sentence using ‘have’)

— Have they gone to a picnic?

c) I went to school yesterday. (Simple question using ‘did’)

— Did I go to school yesterday?

d) Tia studies in class x (Information question using ‘which’)

— Which class does Tia study in?

11. Suppose your bicycle has a sudden tyre puncture on your way to school. You have taken the cycle to a repair shop. Write an imaginary dialogue (within 100 words) between the shopkeeper and you.

I: Hello uncle!

Uncle: How are you? Good morning

I: I Am good and you? My brother came here yesterday I think

Uncle: I am also good. Yes, your brother came yesterday and repaired few parts in his cycle and asked me if I have any new collections of the cycle. He was quite impressed with one of the cycles.

I: This boy loves to collect cycles, total wastage of money.

Uncle: But why are you here do you face any problem with your vehicle or need a new one.

I: no, uncle my bicycle is working great now I don’t need a new one but today I got a puncture in my tyre will you see it.

Uncle: yes of course but how did it happen.

I: I was going to college and few glass pieces made the puncture.

Uncle: ok I will repair it within 10 minutes.

I: thank you and how much will you take.

Uncle: give me 20 rupees

I: ok repair it I will come here by 5 pm and that time I will pay you. Bye.

Uncle: bye

12. Write a story (within 100 words) using the given hints. Give a title to the story.

Crow sitting on a tree —- piece of meat on its beak —– fox passing under the tree — wants the meat — asks the crow to sing — crow keeps under its feet and sings —– fooled, fox leaves.

One day in a forest a crow was singing and collecting food for him. He was sitting near the river and doing his job. While collecting food he got tired and sat one tree by taking a piece of meat on its beak. He was sitting and relaxing and at that time a fox was passing under the tree and saw the crow with the meat. He was hungry and wanted that meat. He tries to be clever as he knows that the crow will not give the meat. He applies a trick and asks the crow to sing a song because if he sings he has to open his beak and the meat would fall and the fox would collect it. But the crow too was clever he knew that the fox is trying to be clever as he wants the meat. So he keeps the meat under his feet and starts singing. The fox became disappointed and was fooled by the crow. The fooled fox left the place and the hope of eating the meat. The crow giving a wicked smile started enjoying his meal.

Questions And Answers

What did the narrator want to tell us about in our runaway kite?

Philippa wants to tell us how their family was reunited on account of the kite.

How did Philippa and Claude decorate the big kite?

The narrator and Claude decorated their kites with lovely red paper and attached gold tinsel stars over it and wrote their full name Claude litte and Plilippa litte.

What did they write on the kite?

The big kite was covered with lovely red paper. Gold tinsel stars were pasted all over it. The full names of the narrator’s brother and herself i.e. Claude Leete and Philippa Leete and their location ‘Big Half Moon Lighthouse’ were written on the kite.

What makes the narrator and Claude happy?

The narrator and claude both are happy as they get their relatives.

What was the reaction of Claude when the kite snapped?

The reaction of Claude was as he had to hurry to fix the kite and he rushed into the lighthouse to get some paper.

What did Claude and the narrator not understand?

The narrator’s father looked sorrowful and said it was all his fault, when he was asked if he had any other relation except his children. Claude and the narrator could not understand the reason behind their father’s words.

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