Up Into The Cherry Summary Class 9 English Poem

Up Into The Cherry Summary Class 9 English Poem

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Up Into The Cherry Summary Class 9 English Poem

About the poem:

This poem is about a child who has climbed a tree and is enjoying the beautiful nature from up there. The child has described everything in detail, about what he could see from high above the tree.

Structure of the poem:

“Up into the cherry-tree

Who should climb but little me?

I held the trunk with both my hands

And looked abroad on foreign lands.

 

I saw the next-door garden lie,

Adorned with flowers, before my eye,

And many pleasant places more

That I had never seen before.

I saw the dimpling river pass

And be the sky’s blue looking-glass;

The dusty roads go up and down

With people tramping in to town.

 

If I could find a higher tree,

Farther and farther I should see,

To where the grown-up river slips

Into the sea among the ships.

 

To where the roads on either hand

Lead onward into fairy land,

Where all the children dine at five,

And all the playthings come alive.”

 

The specific rhyming pattern in the poem is AABB CCDD EEFF GGHH IIJJ.

Line by line analysis of the poem:

Stanza 1:

“Up into the cherry-tree

Who should climb but little me?

I held the trunk with both my hands

And looked abroad on foreign lands.”

The child shows his excitement to climb the cherry tree and look at the world from there. He held the trunk of the tree with his little hands and climbed it. Reaching up there, he looked around. He looked at the faraway lands as well.

Stanza 2:

“I saw the next-door garden lie,

Adorned with flowers, before my eye,

And many pleasant places more

That I had never seen before.”

The child could see the garden of his neighbouring house. The garden was beautifully decorated with flowers. The view was pleasant. The child exclaimed that he had never seen something as beautiful as the garden filled with flowers before.

Stanza 3:

“I saw the dimpling river pass

And be the sky’s blue looking-glass;

The dusty roads go up and down

With people tramping in to town.”

Sitting high up on the tree, he also saw the river pass. The blue sky looked amazing from there. The roads looked as if they went up and down. He also saw people walking down the streets, probably going to the town.

Stanza 4:

“If I could find a higher tree,

Farther and farther, I should see,

To where the grown-up river slips

Into the sea among the ships.”

In the fourth stanza, the child says how he wishes that there was a higher tree. Had there been one, he would climb it as well and seen farther. He would also try to figure out the point where the river meets into the sea.

Stanza 5:

“To where the roads on either hand

Lead onward into fairy land,

Where all the children dine at five,

And all the playthings come alive.”

This is continuity to the last stanza. He says that if could climb a higher tree, he would locate where the roads end and meet into a fairyland. He basically feels that his imaginations might come true if he could look farther. Maybe at someplace children would finish their meals at five and toys and playthings would come alive. He wanted to see these events if he climbed a higher tree.

Figures of speech used in the poem:

Alliteration: This is a figure of speech where closely associated words or corresponding words begin with the same alphabet in a sentence.

“I held the trunk with both my hands”

“Farther and farther, I should see”

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