NCERT Solutions for Class 10 English First Flight Chapter 7 Glimpses of India

NCERT Solutions for Class 10 English

Glimpses of India NCERT Solutions for Class 10 English First Flight Chapter 7

Glimpses of India NCERT Text Book Questions and Answers

I. A Baker from Goa

Glimpses of India Part 1 Oral Comprehension Check

Question 1.
What are the elders in Goa nostalgic about?
Answer:
The elders in Goa are nostalgic about the good old Portuguese days, the Portuguese and their famous loaves of bread.

Question 2.
Is bread-making still popular in Goa? How do you know?
Answer:
Yes, bread-making is still popular in Goa. It still exists as family profession there.

Question 3.
What is the baker called?
Answer:
The baker is called ‘pader’ in Goa.

Question 4.
When would the baker come every day? Why did the children run to meet him?
Answer:
The baker used to come at least twice a day. Once when he set out in the morning on his selling round and again when he returned. The children ran to meet him for bread-bangles which they chose carefully.

Question 5.
Match the following. What is a must
(i) as marriage gifts? — cakes and bolinhas
(ii) for a party or a feast? — sweet bread called bol
(iii) for a daughter’s engagement? — bread
(iv) for Christmas? — sandwiches
Answer:
(i) as marriage gifts — sweet bread called ‘bol’
(ii) for a party or a feast — bread
(iii) for a daughter’s engagement — sandwiches
(iv) for Christmas — cakes and bolinhas

Question 6.
What did the bakers wear:
(i) in the Portuguese days?
(ii) when the author was young?
Answer:
(i) The baker had a peculiar dress known as the ‘kabai’—a single piece long frock reaching down to the knees.
(ii) When the author was young, he had seen bakers wearing a shirt and trousers which were shorter than half pants.

Question 7.
Who invites the comment—‘he is dressed like a pader’? Why?
Answer:
Anyone who wears half pants which reaches just below the knees invites the comment that he is dressed like a pader because it was the baker who used to dress like that in the author’s childhood days.

Question 8.
Where were the monthly accounts of the baker recorded?
Answer:
The baker’s monthly accounts used to be recorded on some wall in pencil.

Question 9.
What does a ‘jackfruit-like appearance’ mean?
Answer:
A ‘jackfruit-like appearance’ refers to a plump physique.

II. Coorg

Glimpses of India Part 2 Thinking about the Text

Question 1.
Where is Coorg?
Answer:
Coorg is midway between Mysore and the coastal town of Mangalore.

Question 2.
What is the story about the Kodavu people’s descent?
Answer:
The people of Coorg are possibly of Greek or Arabic descent. As one story goes, a part of Alexander’s army moved south along the coast, married amongst the locals and settled there.

Question 3.
What are some of the things you now know about
(i) the people of Coorg?
(ii) the main crop of Coorg?
(iii) the sports it offers to tourists?
(iv) the animals you are likely to see in Coorg?
(v) its distance from Bengaluru, and how to get there?
Answer:
(i) People — The people of Coorg are fiercely independent. They are of Greek or Arabic descent.
Their traditions and religious rites are distinct from the Hindu mainstream. Known as Kodagu, they are the only people in India permitted to carry firearms without a license. It’s a proved race of martial men and beautiful women.
(ii) Crop — The main crop of Coorg is coffee.
(iii) Sports — Coorg offers sports like river rafting, canoeing, rappelling, rock climbing and mountain biking to a tourist.
(iv) Animals — Birds, bees, butterflies, macaques, squirrels, fish, langurs and wild elephants are . likely to be seen in Coorg.
(v) Distance — Coorg is 250-260 km from Bengaluru. One can get there by rail or road from Bengaluru or Mangalore. The nearest airports are Mangalore (135 km) and Bengaluru (260 km).

Glimpses of India Extra Questions and Answers

I. A Baker from Goa

Glimpses of India Part 1 Reference-to-Context Questions

Read the following extracts carefully and answer the questions that follow.

Question 1.
Our elders are often heard reminiscing nostalgically about those good old Portuguese days, the Portuguese and their famous loaves of bread. Those eaters of loaves might have vanished but the makers are still there. We still have amongst us the mixers, the moulders and those who bake the loaves. Those age-old, time-tested furnaces still exist. The fire in the furnaces has not yet been extinguished.

(a) The elders are often heard reminiscing ………… about the good old Portuguese days.
Answer:
nostalgically

(b) The different stages of baking are mixing, moulding and ………….
Answer:
baking

(c) The eaters of loaves might have vanished but the makers are still there. (True/False)
Answer:
True

(d) Find the meaning of the word ‘disappeared’ from the extract.
Answer:
vanished

Question 2.
The thud and jingle of the traditional baker’s bamboo, heralding his arrival in the morning, can still be heard in some places. Maybe the father is not alive but the son still carries on the family profession. These bakers are, even today, known as pader in Goa.

(a) The baker heralds his arrival by the ……… of his bamboo staff.
Answer:
thud and jingle

(b) Maybe the father is not ………….. , but the son still carries on the family profession.
Answer:
alive

(c) The baker are, even today, known as pader in Goa. (iVue/False)
Answer:
True

(d) Find the meaning of the word, “announcing” from the extract.
Answer:
heralding

Question 3.
During our childhood in Goa, the baker used to be our friend, companion and guide. He used to come at least twice a day. Once, when he set out in the morning on his selling round, and then again, when he returned after emptying his huge basket. The jingling thud of his bamboo woke us up from sleep and we ran to meet and greet him. Why was it so? Was it for the love of the loaf? Not at all. The loaves were bought by some Paskine or Bastine, the maid-servant of the house! What we longed for were those bread-bangles which we chose carefully. Sometimes it was sweet bread of special make.

(a) The children regarded the baker as a friend, companion and
Answer:
guide

(b) The children longed for
Answer:
bread-bangles

(c) The loaves were bought by some Paskine or Bastine, the maid-servant of the house. (True/False)
Answer:
True

(d) Find a word in the extract which means the same as bvished for’.
Answer:
longed.

Question 4.
Thus, the presence of the baker’s furnace in the village is absolutely essential. The baker or bread-seller of those days had a peculiar dress known as the ‘kabai’. It was a single-piece long frock reaching down to the knees. In our childhood we saw bakers wearing a shirt and trousers which were shorter than full-length ones and longer than half pants.

(a) The presence of the baker’s ………… in the village is absolutely essential.
Answer:
furnace

(b) The bakers of those days in Goa had a peculiar dress known as
Answer:
Kabai

(c) Kabai was a double-piece short frock reaching down to the knees. (True/False)
Answer:
False

(d) Find the meaning of the word “strange” from the extract.
Answer:
peculiar

Question 5.
Even today, anyone who wears a half pant which reaches just below the knees invites the comment that he is dressed like a pader!
The baker usually collected his bills at the end of the month. Monthly accounts used to be recorded on some wall in pencil. Baking was indeed a profitable profession in the old days.

(a) Anyone who wears a half pant that reaches just below the knees is dressed like a
Answer:
Pader

(b) Baking was indeed a profession in the old days in Goa.
Answer:
profitable

(c) The baker usually collected his bills at the end of the year. (True/False)
Answer:
False

(d) Pick out a word from the extract that is the opposite of ‘distributed’.
Answer:
collected

Glimpses of India Part 1 Short Answer Questions

Question  1.
Who are Paders and how did they herald their arrival?
Answer:
The bakers of Goa are known as ‘Paders’. The thud and jingle of the traditional baker’s bamboo are the signal of their arrival in the morning. When the writer was a child, the jingling thud of baker’s bamboo used to wake him up.

Question 2.
What role did the baker play in the childhood of the narrator?
Answer:
The baker played a very important role in the childhood of the narrator. He used to be a companion, friend and a guide for the narrator. Every day the narrator was woken up by him. He used to get sweet bread and delicious loaves from the baker.

Question 3.
How was the arrival of the baker special?
Answer:
The arrival of the baker was very special. He made his musical entry with the ‘Jhang jhang’ sound of his specially made bamboo stick. One hand supported the basket on his head and the other banged the bamboo on the ground. He wore a peculiar dress called ‘Kabai’. They also wore a shirt and trousers which were shorter than full length and longer than half pants.

Question 4.
What justification does the narrator give for not brushing his teeth?
Answer:
The narrator as a child did not brush his teeth or wash his face or mouth properly. He did not think it necessary. He justified his action by saying that a tiger never brushed his teeth. Hot tea could wash and clean up everything nicely. So, there was no need for washing mouth or brushing teeth.

Question 5.
How did the baker attract the children?
Answer:
The jingling thud of bakers’ bamboo used to attract the children. They were fond of sweet bread bangles which were specially made for them. The typical fragrance of the sweet bread and cakes attracted the children and they never missed them.

Question 6.
What is the role of bread on the occasion of marriage?
Answer:
On the occasion of marriage, gifts are exchanged. Marriage gifts are meaningless without the sweet bread known as the ‘bol’. Every mother in the family prepares bread, cake and loaves on the occasion of her-daughter’s engagement.

Question 7.
What is the role of a baker in a Goan village?
Answer:
A baker played a very important role in the lives of people of Goa. They are essential for a village. No function, no festival, no party was possible in the absence of a baker. The baker supplied loaves and cakes on these occasions. Some special breads and cakes are also prepared by them for some special occasion.

Question 8.
Describe ‘kabai’. What is its importance for a baker?
Answer:
‘Kabai’ is a unique peculiar dress of a baker. It is a single-piece long frock reaching down to the knees. It is the ‘kabai’ which distinguishes a baker from others.

Question 9.
How did the bakers maintain their accounts?
Answer:
The bakers used to collect their bills at the end of the month. Monthly accounts were recorded on some wall in pencil.

Question 10.
Why is a jackfruit-like physical appearance compared to a baker?
Answer:
Baking was a profitable business. Most of the bakers were prosperous. Their servants and family members were healthy and happy. Their plump physique was an open testimony to their prosperity. They looked like a jack-fruit.

Question 11.
What do the elders in Goa still love to remember?
Answer:
The elders in Goa still love to remember about the good old Portuguese days, the Portuguese and their famous loaves of bread. The Portuguese might have left but their art of baking is still carried as a tradition.

Glimpses of India Part 1 Long Answer Questions

Question 1.
‘During our childhood in Goa, the baker used to be our friend, companion and guide’. What does this statement tell you about the character of the narrator? Are there some traits of the character of the narrator which need to be developed in you?
Answer:
The narrator Lucio Rodrigues becomes nostalgic as he talked about a traditional Goan village baker who occupied a special place in the society. He referred to the baker as his friend, companion and guide. It shows that the people of Goa are rich in human values. The narrator himself has respect for all the professions. He never looks down upon anybody. The baker with his disciplined routine and the most sought after loaves of bread teaches the children the value of being punctual. Certain, social values like love, compassion, empathy and a sense of cooperation are there that need to be developed. These qualities make a person a useful member of the society. Moreover, no profession should be looked down upon.

Question 2.
The Portuguese still remember their good old days, the traditional bakers and their loaves of breads. This fact reflected the deep-rooted love for their culture and traditions. What lesson do you learn from their life?
Answer:
The author enjoys listening to the stories of his elders about the Portuguese baker and their delicious loaves of bread. Time has changed now. Bakers are still remembered but metaphorically. If any person is seen wearing a half pant that reaches just below the knees or has a plump physique, he is called a baker. This reflects the Goan’s love and respect for their tradition and culture. Their life teaches us a valuable lesson to be connected to our roots. It helps us in maintaining our identity all over the world. We should not be influenced by Western culture. Indian tradition is well known for its unity in diversity. We have a rich legacy of culture and values. It is our duty to preserve our heritage and have love and respect for age-old traditions.

Question 3.
Why is the presence of baker’s furnace in the village absolutely necessary? What does this tell you about the social and family life of the Portuguese explaining the in content with the value system of the society.
Answer:
The presence of a baker’s furnace in the village is absolutely necessary.The baker with his fragrant and sweet loaves holds a special place in the lives of the Goans. Though the old bakers have died but their offsprings still continue the family profession. The sweet loaves of bread are very popular. Even in the marriage gift, it is of utmost importance to include the sweet bread, sandwiches, bolinhas and other bakery items.

These items are prepared in furnaces that still exist. It throws light on the family and social life of the people. The society has a rich value system. We must also live together with love and follow the rituals passed on to us through generations. Modernity must not be at the cost of forgetting our own traditions. The elders have a wisdom to enrich the younger generations’ radical views. There must be a balance between the traditional and social ethos and modern views.

Question 4.
India is known for its old traditions. There is unity in diversity. It is all because we the Indians never forget our culture and tradition. We always cherish the traditional practices. Do you agree? Give your views with reference to the lesson ‘A Baker from Goa’ where the author is nostalgic about the bakers and the traditional cakes of Goa.
Answer:
The author of ‘A Baker from Goa’ cherishes the traditional practices in Goa. He recalls his encounter with the traditional bakers of Goa. It is true that we, Indians, never forget our cultures and traditions. We are known for our traditional food. This keeps us rooted to our motherland. It gives us a sense of pride when we think about our practices. The baker in the story represents the class of traditional professionals who are still keeping the old practices alive. Lucio Rodrigues tells us that when he was . a child, he had a good companionship with a baker. He tells that the bread was baked in the furnace.

The bakers were called the paders. In Portuguese time, there were eaters of loaves who cherished . traditional bread making. The author does not live in Goa but he still remembers the old days. He might have forgotten so many things but he still remembers everything about the traditions of Goa.

II. Coorg

Glimpses of India Part 2 Reference-to-Context Questions

Read the following extracts carefully and answer the questions that follow.

Question 1.
Midway between Mysore and the coastal town of Mangalore sits a piece of heaven that must have drifted from the kingdom of God. This land of rolling hills is inhabited by a proud race of martial men, beautiful women and wild creatures.

(a) Coorg is inhabited by a proud race of men, beautiful women and wild creatures.
Answer:
martial

(b) Coorg is located between Mysore and the of Mangalore.
Answer:
coastal town

(c) Coorg is like a piece of heaven that must have drifted from the kingdom of God. (True/False)
Answer:
True

(d) Find the meaning of the word “warlike or connected with war” from the extract.
Answer:
martial

Question 2.
Coorg, or Kodagu, the smallest district of Karnataka, is home to evergreen rainforests, spices and coffee plantations. Evergreen rainforests cover thirty per cent of this district. During the monsoons, it pours enough to keep many visitors away. The season of joy commences from September and continues till March.

(a) Coorg is the smallest district of Karnataka, home to forests, spices and coffee plantation.
Answer:
evergreen

(b) Evergreen rainforests of Coorg cover of the land of the district.
Answer:
thirty per cent

(c) The monsoon is the season of joy that commences from September and continues till March. (True/False)
Answer:
True

(d) Find the meaning of the words “rains heavily” from the extract.
Answer:
pours.

Question 3.
The weather is perfect, with some showers thrown in for good measure. The air breathes of invigorating coffee. Coffee estates and colonial bungalows stand tucked under tree canopies in prime comers.

(a) The weather is …………. , with some showers thrown in for good measure.
Answer:
perfect

(b) Coffee estates and colonial bungalows stand tucked under tree in prime corners.
Answer:
canopies

(c) The weather is not perfect as there was no showers thrown in for good measure. (True/False)
Answer:
False

(d) Find the meaning of the word “intensifying” from the extract.
Answer:
invigorating

Question 4.
Coorgi homes have a tradition of hospitality, and they are more than willing to recount numerous tales of valour related to their sons and fathers. The Coorg Regiment is one of the most decorated in the Indian Army, and the first Chief of the Indian Army, General Cariappa, was a Coorgi. Even now, Kodavus are the only people in India permitted to carry firearms without a licence.

(a) Coorgi homes have a tradition of
Answer:
hospitality

(b) The Coorg Regiment is one of the most Regiment in the Indian Army.
Answer:
decorated

(c) Kodavus are the only people in India permitted to carry firearms without a licence. (True/False)
Answer:
True

(d) Find the meaning of the words “courage and bravery in war” from the extract.
Answer:
Velour

Question 5.
The most laidback individuals become converts to the life of high-energy adventure with river rafting, canoeing, rappelling, rock climbing and mountain biking. Numerous walking trails in this region are a favourite with trekkers.

(a) The most laidback individuals become to the life of high-energy adventure with river rafting, canoeing and mountain biking.
Answer:
converts

(b) Numerous walking trails in Coorg are a favourite with
Answer:
trekkers

(c) The sports that are open for the visitors in Coorg are rock climbing rappelling, canoeing and mountain biking. (True/False)
Answer:
True

(d) Find the meaning of the words “calm and relaxed” from the extract.
Answer:
laidback.

Question 6.
Birds, bees and butterflies are there to give you company. Macaques, Malabar squirrels, langurs and slender loris keep a watchful eye from the tree canopy. I do, however, prefer to step aside for wild elephants.

(a) Birds, bees and butterflies give the a good company.
Answer:
visitors

(b) From the tree canopy, macaques, Malabar squirrels, langurs and slender loris keep a
Answer:
watchful eye

(c) The narrator prefers to step aside for wild elephants. fitue/False)
Answer:
True

(d) Find the opposite of ‘domestic’ from the extract.
Answer:
Wild

Glimpses of India Part 2 Short Answer Questions

Question 1.
Where is Coorg located? Why is Coorg called the land of the rolling hills?
Answer:
Coorg is the smallest district of Karnataka. It is situated midway between Mysore and the coastal town of Mangalore. It is a land of rolling hills and picturesque landscape. Coorg is a coffee country famous for its hills, rainforests and spices. It is surrounded by hills and covered with rainforests. Because of numerous hills, the city is also called the land of rolling hills.

Question 2.
What is Kodagu? Why is it famous?
Answer:
odagu is another name of Coorg, the smallest district of Karnataka. It is famous for its coffee gardens, spices and rainforests. It is also famous for its brave people and culture.

Question 3.
What is the most suitable weather for the visitors to visit Coorg? Why?
Answer:
The most suitable weather for the visitors begins in the month of September and continues till March. Coorg is covered with rainforests which keep the visitors away during the monsoon. The weather is perfect during the months of September to May.

Question 4.
What is the origin of the people of Coorg?
Answer:
According to one story, the people of Coorg are the descent of Greek. The army of Alexander settled here and expanded their families by marrying the locals. According to other belief, the people of Coorg are the descent of the Arabs as their dress resembles the Kuffia worn by the Arabs.

Question 5.
What is the story regarding the Greek origin of the people of Coorg?
Answer:
According to one story, a part of Alexander’s army moved south along the coast and settled here when return became impractical. These people married amongst the locals and expanded their family. Hence, it is believed that the people of Coorg are possibly of Greek descent.

Question 6.
What is Kuppia? How does it make the Kodavus close to the Arabs?
Answer:
‘Kuppia’ is a long, black coat with embroidered waist belt worn by the people of Coorg. It is very similar to Kuffia worn by the Arabs.

Question 7.
What are the two contradictory traits of the character of the Kodavus?
Answer:
The people of Coorg are peace-loving people. They are known for their hospitality and tradition. On the other hand, they are also known for their bravery. They are the only people in India who are permitted to carry firearms without a licence.

Question 8.
Why are the Kodavus permitted to carry firearms without a licence?
Answer:
Kodavus, the people of Coorg, are known for their loyalty and bravery. The Coorg regiment is one of the most celebrated regiments in the Indian Army. The people of Coorg are the only one in India who are allowed to carry firearms without licence.

Glimpses of India Part 2 Long Answer Questions

Question 1.
The Coorgis are known for their hospitality. They are friendly and caring. Which of their qualities one must inculcate in one’s life? What makes them so loveable?
Answer:
Coorgis are well known for their courage, bravery and hospitality. They are very warm people who entertain and look after their guests as family members. They are always willing to recount numerous tales of valour when in the company of their guests. It shows that they want their guests to feel at home by sharing the tales from their lives. We learn to be friendly, caring and sensitive to the need of others. They follow the age-old Indian tradition of ‘Athithi Devo Bhav’. Guests are not considered as burden. They provide them with all the comforts, and make them feel at home. The warmth in their behaviour makes them loveable.

Question 2.
The Coorgis are happy because they are true lovers of nature. They have a great environmental sense. They never interfere with nature. What can we learn from them about the environmental issues?
Answer:
It is a fact that Coorgis live in harmony with nature. All kinds of aquatic as well as land animals and birds like fish, kingfisher, squirrels, langur, elephant, bees and butterflies, and many other arboreal animals live here fearlessly in the dense forests. It shows that Coorgis have a great environmental sense. They care for their surroundings and never interfere with nature resulting in the serene and lush green atmosphere. We should also protect nature by planting more and more trees. Cities are especially getting more and more polluted. In such a scenario, it is our foremost duty to take a step in the direction of preserving our flora and fauna. We can learn from them how to live in harmony with nature.

Question 3.
The Coorgis are religious and have deep faith in God. Justify the fact taking examples from the text. Give your opinion also on the importance of having faith in the Supreme Power.
Answer:
The world’s largest Tibetan settlement is situated in Coorg. The monks, in red, ochre and yellow – robes are described as being among many other surprises that await us. The monastery is considered to be the heart and soul of India. It is clearly revealed that Coorgis are highly religious people and have deep faith in the Supreme Power.

It is of utmost importance to perform all our duties with uninterrupted dedication without cribbing over results. Always have faith in God and think positively. Moulding our thoughts in the right direction does miracles and can bring about the desired change in the way we think or act. Always remember that there is a supreme power who controls the whole universe. We should also have faith in all the religions and not behave like a fanatic.

Question 4.
The Coorgis are said to be descendants of Greek Arabs. They have settled here and there but they have never given up their values and culture. Today many Indians have settled abroad but they are still Indians by heart. They still believe in Indian culture and keeping it alive. Do you think that when we settle abroad we must change our culture to adopt the culture of the country where we, settle? Does it help us?
Answer:
There is no doubt one is known by one’s culture. The Coorgis are the descendants of the Greeks or Arabs and scattered here and there but they have not lost their identity. They still have all the traditional values of their clan. The same is true in the case of Indians settled abroad. They are still Indians by heart. They still believe in Indian culture and keeping it alive.

We should never forget our traditions and customs. We should not forget our roots. Our culture gives us recognition. We should never change our values or culture when we are abroad. If we do this, we lose our originality and identity. The Coorgis give us a lesson that we should be proud of our traditions and should never give them up. If we stick to our culture, we always get recognition. It helps us.

III. Tea From Assam

Glimpses of India Part 3 Reference-to-Context Questions

Read the following extracts carefully and answer the questions that follow.

Question 1.
They sipped the steaming hot liquid. Almost everyone in their compartment was drinking tea too.
“Do you know that over eighty crore cups of tea are drunk every day throughout the world?” Rajvir said.
“Whew!” exclaimed Pranjol. “Tea really is very popular.”
The train pulled out of the station. Pranjol buried his nose in his detective book again.

(a) Rajvir and Pranjol sipped the ………….. hot liquid.
Answer:
steaming

(b) Pranjol that tea was very popular.
Answer:
exclaimed

(c) Over eighty crore cups of tea are drunk every day. (True/False)
Answer:
True

(d) Find a word from the extract similar in meaning to ‘drank very small quantity at a time’.
Answer:
sipped

Question 2.
The train pulled out of the station. Pranjol buried his nose in his detective book again, Rajvir too was an ardent fan of detective stories, but at the moment he was keener on looking at the beautiful scenery.
It was green, green everywhere. Rajvir had never seen so much greenery before. Then the soft green paddy fields gave way to tea bushes.

(a) Rajvir was keener on looking at the beautiful of the tea estates in Assam.
Answer:
scenery

(b) Pranjol was reading a ………… book again.
Answer:
detective

(c) The soft green paddy fields gave way to tea bushes. (True/False)
Answer:
True

(d) Find the meaning of the word “enthusiastic” from the extract.
Answer:
ardent

Question 3.
It was a magnificent view. Against the backdrop of densely wooded hills a sea of tea bushes stretched as far as the eye could see. Dwarfing the tiny tea plants were tall sturdy shade-trees and amidst the orderly rows of bushes busily moved doll-like figures. In the distance was an ugly building with smoke billowing out of tall chimneys.

(a) The greenery, wooded hills and tea-gardens made the outside scene
Answer:
magnificent

(b) Dwarfing the tiny tea plants were tall stardy
Answer:
shade trees

(c) The tea pluckers were all doll-like figures. (True/False)
Answer:
True

(d) Find the meaning of the words “extremely attractive” from the extract.
Answer:
‘magnificent’.

Question 4.
“Hey, a tea-garden!” Rajvir cried excitedly.
Pranjol, who had been born and brought up on a plantation, didn’t share Rajvir’s excitement.
“Oh, this is tea country now,” he said. “Assam has the largest concentration of plantations in the world. You will see enough gardens to last you a lifetime!”

(a) Assam has the largest ……….. of plantations in the world.
Answer:
concentration

(b) Pranjol was born and brought up on a ………..
Answer:
plantation

(c) Rajvir was excited to see a paddy field for the first time. (True/False)
Answer:
False

(d) Find the meaning of the words “a lot of something in one place” from the extract.
Answer:
concentration

Question 5.
“Well, there’s the one about the Chinese emperor who always boiled water before drinking it. One day a few leaves of the twigs burning under the pot fell into the water giving it a delicious flavour. It is said they were tea leaves.”
“Tell me another!” scoffed Pranjol.

(a) There are many ………. about the discovery of tea.
Answer:
legends

(b) One of the legends is the legend about tea.
Answer:
Chinese

(c) One day a few leaves of the twigs burning under the pot fell into the water giving it a delicious flavour. (True/False)
Answer:
True

(d) Find the meaning of the word “having a very pleasant taste” from the extract.
Answer:
delicious

Question 6.
“We have an Indian legend too. Bodhidharma, an ancient Buddhist ascetic, cut off his eyelids because – he felt sleepy during meditations. Ten tea plants grew out of the eyelids. The leaves of these plants
when put in hot water and drunk vanished sleep.

(a) Bodhidharma cut his ………….. because he felt sleepy during meditation.
Answer:
eyelids

(b) Bodhidharma was an ancient Buddhist
Answer:
ascetic

(c) Twelve tea plants grew out of the eyelids. (True/False)
Answer:
False

(d) Find the meaning of the word “disappeared” from the extract.
Answer:
Vanished

Question 7.
The train clattered into Mariani junction. The boys collected their luggage and pushed their way to the crowded platform.

(a) The train clattered into junction.
Answer:
Mariani

(b) The boys were going to
Answer:
Assam

(c) The boys lost their luggages and were running through the crowd. (True/False)
Answer:
False

(d) Find the meaning of the word “entered” from the extract.
Answer:
clattered

Question 8.
Pranjol’s parents were waiting for them.
Soon they were driving towards Dhekiabari, the tea-garden managed by Pranjol’s father. An hour later the car veered sharply off the main road. They crossed a cattle-bridge and entered Dhekiabari Tea Estate.

(a) Dhekiabari is the Managed by Panjol’s father.
Answer:
tea-garden

(b) Pranjol and Rajvir crossed a and entered Dhekiabari.
Answer:
cattle bridge

(c) Pranjol and Rajvir lost the way to the Dhekiabari Tea Estate. (True/False)
Answer:
False

(d) Find the meaning of the word “turned”.
Answer:
veered

Question 9.
On both sides of the gravel-road were acre upon acre of tea-bushes, all neatly pruned to the same height. Groups of tea-pluckers, with bamboo baskets on their backs, wearing plastic aprons, were plucking the newly sprouted leaves.

(a) On both sides of the gravel road tea-bushes were neatly …………. to the same height.
Answer:
pruned

(b) The women were plucking the newly ………….. leaves.
Answer:
sprouted

(c) The women tea-pluckers had mango baskets on their back. (True/False)
Answer:
False

(d) Find the meaning of the word “clothes” from the extract.
Answer:
aprons

Glimpses of India Part 3 Short Answer Questions

Question 1.
What excited Rajvir? Why did Pranjol not share his excitement?
Answer: The sight of the vast sea of lush green tea bushes coupled with tall sturdy trees excited Rajvir. Pranjol
did not share Rajvir’s excitement as he had been born and brought up on a tea plantation.

Question 2.
What legends are associated with the origin of tea? [Delhi 2016]
Answer:
(a) There was one Chinese emperor who always boiled water before drinking it. One day a few leaves of the twigs burning under the pot fell into the water, which gave it a delicious flavour. It is said that they were tree leaves.
(b) Bodhidharma, an ancient ‘Budhist ascetic, cut off his eyelids because he felt sleepy during ‘ meditations. Ten tea plants grew out of the eyelids. The leaves of these plants when put in hot water drunk vanished sleep.

Question 3.
Why did Rajvir feel that the view outside the window was magnificent? –
Answer:
Rajvir had never seen such beautiful greenery in his life. He was fascinated to see the tea gardens and the wooded hills so he called it a magnificent view. The tea pluckers looked like dolls to him.

Question 4.
Why does Rajvir call the workers doll-like figures?
Answer:
The tea pluckers were the local women. They had covered themselves with clothes from top to bottom. They looked like moving dolls. Rajvir called them doll-like figures. They really looked very pretty.

Question 5.
Why was Pranjol not excited on seeing the tea garden?
Answer:
Pranjol was born and brought up in Assam. He had been watching the tea gardens since his childhood. There was nothing new for him. So he was not excited on seeing the tea gardens.

Question 6.
What is the Chinese legend about the discovery of tea?
Answer:
According to the Chinese legend, a Chinese emperor discovered tea accidentally. He used to boil water before drinking it. One day a few leaves of some twigs burning under the pot fell into the water giving it a delicious flavour. It is said that they were tea leaves.

Question 7.
What is the Indian legend about the discovery of tea?
Answer:
According to Indian legend, Bodhidharma, an ancient Buddhist ascetic, cut off his eyelids because he -felt very sleepy during meditation. Ten tea plants grew out of the eyelids. The leaves of these plants when put into hot water and drunk vanished sleep.

Question 8.
How are tea pluckers different from other farmers or labourers on the farms?
Answer:
The tea pluckers were different from other workers on the farm. They had bamboo baskets on their back. They were wearing plastic clothes. They looked like moving dolls.

Question 9.
Which tea is considered the best tea? Why?
Answer:
The tea prepared from the second flush on sprouting period which begins in the month of May and lasts till the end of July is considered the best tea. It is the best one because it is prepared from the new leaves.

Glimpses of India Part 3 Long Answer Questions

Question 1.
Rajvir felt too excited on reaching Assam while Pranjol showed least interest in his excitement. What could be the reason behind this? Do you think it is appropriate on PranjoPs part to react like this? Justify your answer with reason.
Answer:
Pranjol invited his friend Rajvir to spend some days with him in his hometown Assam. On reaching there, Rajvir was stunned to see the beauty of tea plantations. It was an entirely new experience for him while for Pranjol, these were a common sight so he showed least interest in Rajvir’s excitement. I think it is not appropriate on Pranjol’s part to react thus. No doubt his indifference was natural but it might dampen Rajvir’s spirit. Sometimes we have to act according to the wishes of the person opposite us, especially when the person is very close to us. A true friend is one who understands the feelings of his friend and tries to make him happier. Although Pranjol and Rajvir were very close yet one should always try to strengthen the bond of friendship.

Question 2.
Pranjol invited Rajvir to his home in Assam during summer vacation. Express your views on the deep bond that they both shared. Do you also believe in the compatibility of two individuals? Why/ Why not?
Answer:
Rajvir and Pranjol both were good friends to the extent that they spent time with each other at their homes too. This is apparent from the fact that Rajvir was going to spend his summer vacation with Pranjol in Assam. They both indeed shared a deep bond. Their likes and dislikes were almost similar.

They both liked to read detective books. They enjoyed sipping hot steaming tea. True friendship is one in which a friend is always eager to listen to the other. The same is clearly seen when Pranjol listened to the legends associated with tea patiently as told by Rajvir. Compatibility and perseverance are the pillars that support true friendship. Yes, I also believe in the compatibility of two individuals for the relationship to sustain longer.

Question 3.
Does the statement – ‘Dwarfing the tiny tea plants were tall sturdy shade-trees….’ remind you of an elder in the family who protects the younger ones with love and care? How should you behave with the elders of the family who do so much for you?
Answer:
The view outside the train was magnificent. The sentence ‘Dwarfing the tiny tea plants were tall sturdy shade trees.’ indicates to the nature’s way of protecting its off springs. The tall sturdy shady trees provide shade to the tiny tea plants which may otherwise get withered away in the heat of the sun. In the same manner, elders of a family protect the younger ones and take a great care of them with love and compassion. Particularly in Indian society, family plays a protective role in nurturing the children and taking care of all their needs.

It is the duty of the children also to listen to the elders and respect them. Nowadays family values are fast disappearing. Such a trend is very harmful to the society as well as the individual. Love, empathy, respect for each other, understanding, a sense of individual duties are the qualities that cement the relationships in a family.

error: Content is protected !!