MCQ Questions for Class 10 History Chapter 5 The Age of Industrialisation with Answers

If you’re looking for a way to enhance your Class 10 History, then look no further than the NCERT MCQ Questions for Class 10 History Chapter 5 The Age of Industrialisation with Answers. MCQ Questions for Class 10 Social Science with Answers is perfect for those who are in class 10 and want to get ahead of everyone else by mastering their subject skills as soon as possible! You can practice and test your subject knowledge by solving this MCQ of Chapter 5 History Objective Questions.

The Age of Industrialisation Class 10 MCQs Questions with Answers

Solving Class 10 History Chapter 5 MCQ with Answers, can be of great help to students as they will be aware of all the concepts. These MCQ on The Age of Industrialisation with Answers pave for a quick revision, thereby helping you learn more about this subject.

Question 1.
In many industries where production fluctuated with the season, industrialists, usually preferred:
(a) Indentured labour
(b) Machines
(c) Hand labour
(d) All of the above

Answer

Answer: (c) Hand labour
Industrialists preferred hand labour where production fluctuated with the season.


Question 2.
Machines were oriented to produce:
(а) Fancy dresses standardised goods for a few people
(b) Uniforms for a mass market
(c) Uniforms, standardised goods for a mass market
(d) None of the above

Answer

Answer: (c) Uniforms, standardised goods for a mass market
All that time, merchants were oriented to producing uniforms, standardised goods for a mass market.


Question 3.
In mid-nineteenth century in Britain; 500 varieties of ……………………… were produced and 45 kinds of ………………………
(a) Fancy dresses, uniforms
(b) Cups, plates
(c) Hammers, axes
(d) All the above

Answer

Answer: (c) Hammers, axes
In mid-nineteenth century in Britain 500 varieties of hammers were produced and 45 kinds of axes.


Question 4.
The upper classes the aristocrats and the bourgeoisie preferred things produced by:
(a) Machines
(b) Hand
(c) Both (a) and (b)
(d) None of the above

Answer

Answer: (b) Hand
The upper classes the aristocrats preferred goods made by hand.


Question 5.
After the busy season was over, the poor :
(a) Went to their villages
(b) Went to the countryside
(c) Went on the streets again
(d) None of the above

Answer

Answer: (c) Went on the streets again
The poor people were employed seasonally and thus after the busy season they were in the streets again.


Question 6.
In the early nineteenth century wages:
(a) Increased
(b) Decreased
(c) Remained the same
(d) None of the above

Answer

Answer: (a) Increased
Wages increased somewhat in the early nineteenth century.


Question 7.
When the ……………………… was introduced in the woollen industry, women who survived on hand spinning began attacking the new machine.
(a) Spinning Jenny
(b) Spinning Combine
(c) Spinning Penny
(d) none of the above

Answer

Answer: (a) Spinning Jenny
With the introduction of Spinning Jenny, women began attacking the new machines.


Question 8.
Coarser cottons were produced in many countries, but the fine varieties often came from:
(a) China
(b) Japan
(c) Bangladesh
(d) India

Answer

Answer: (d) India
Fine cotton was produced in India because of better soil and climatic factors.


Question 9.
Masulipatam on the Coromandel coast and Hoogly in Bengal had trade links with:
(а) North-East Asian Ports
(b) South-East Asian Ports
(c) North-East Asian Ports
(d) South-East Asian Ports

Answer

Answer: (d) South-East Asian Ports
Masulipatam had trade links with South-East Asian Ports.


Question 10.
The French, Dutch, Portuguese as well as the local traders competed in the market:
(а) T secure raw clothes
(b) To secure finished clothes
(c) To secure woven clothes
(d) None of the above

Answer

Answer: (c) To secure woven clothes
They wanted to acquire woven cloth.


Question 11.
The company appointed a paid servant to supervise weavers. He was called:
(a) Officers
(b) Tehsildar
(c) Gomastha
(d) none of the above

Answer

Answer: (c) Gomastha
He was known as Gomastha.


Question 12.
The first cotton mill in Bombay came up in :
(a) 1852
(b) 1853
(c) 1854
(d) 1855

Answer

Answer: (c) 1854
The first cotton mill came up in 1854 and it went into production two years later.


Question 13.
The history of many business groups goes back to trade with:
(a) Japan
(b) Britain
(c) USA
(d) China

Answer

Answer: (d) China
China had trade links with many countries.


Question 14.
The Marwari businessman who set up the first Indian jute mill in Calcutta in 1917 was:
(a) Seth Hukumchand
(b) Seth Manikchand
(c) Seth Ramchand
(d) None of the above

Answer

Answer: (a) Seth Hukumchand
Seth Hukumchand set up the first Indian jute mill in Calcutta in 1917.


Question 15.
Advertisements of Indian manufacturers became a vehicle of the nationalist message of:
(a) Purely Indian
(b) Purely English
(c) Swadeshi
(d) None of the

Answer

Answer: (c) Swadeshi
Indian manufactures became a vehicle of the nationalist message and thus their advertisements were called swadeshi messages.


Question 16.
E.T. Pauli produced a music book that had a picture on the cover page announcing the:
(a) ‘Dawn of the year’
(b) ‘Dawn of the Century’
(c) ‘Dawn of the country’
(d) none of the above

Answer

Answer: (b) ‘Dawn of the Century’
In 1900, a popular music publisher E.T. Pauli produced a music book that had a picture on the cover page announcing the ‘Dawn of the Century’.


Question 17.
Most historians refer to the phase of industrialisation as:
(a) Dawn-industrialisation
(b) Present-industrialisation
(c) Proto-industrialisation
(d) None of the above

Answer

Answer: (c) Proto-industrialisation
Many historians refer to the phase of industrialisation as proto-industrialisation. ‘Proto’ means the first of early form of something.


Question 18.
In the countryside poor peasants and artisans began working:
(a) For the king
(b) For the richmen
(c) For merchants
(d) All the above

Answer

Answer: (c) For merchants
Merchants were rich people, who had astisans and the poor working for them.


Question 19.
Merchants were based in towns but the work was done mostly:
(a) On the roadside
(b) In their houses
(c) In the countryside
(d) All the above

Answer

Answer: (c) In the countryside
Though merchants were based in towns the work was done mostly in the countryside.


Question 20.
A merchant clothier in England, purchased wool from a wool stapler and:
(a) Carried it to the spinners
(b) Carried it to the weaver
(c) Carried it to the factory
(d) None of the above

Answer

Answer: (a) Carried it to the spinners
A merchant clothier in England purchased wool for a wool stapler, and carried it to the spinners.


Question 21.
The finishing of the cloth was done in ……………………… before the export merchants sold the cloth in the international market.
(a) US
(b) Sydney
(c) London
(d) Moscow

Answer

Answer: (c) London
All the finishing was done in London before the export merchant sold the cloth in the international market.


Question 22.
The proto-industrial system was a part of a network of:
(a) Commercial exchanges
(b) Loose exchanges
(c) A global exchanges
(d) All the above

Answer

Answer: (a) commercial exchanges
The proto-industrial system was a part of a network of commercial exchanges. It was controlled by merchants and the goods were produced by a vast number of producers.


Question 23.
The earliest factories in England came up by the:
(a) 1720s
(b) 1730s
(c) 1740s
(d) 1750s

Answer

Answer: (b) 1730s
The earliest factories in England came up by the 1730s.


Question 24.
In the early nineteenth century, ……………………… increasingly became an intimate part of the English landscape.
(a) Quantity
(b) Quality
(c) Factories
(d) Agriculture

Answer

Answer: (c) Factories
In the early nineteenth century, factories became an intimate part of the English landscape.


Question 25.
The most dynamic industries in Britain were clearly:
(а) Cotton and jute
(b) Jute and metals
(c) Cotton and metals
(d) Only metals

Answer

Answer: (c) Cotton and metals
In Britain, at that time the most dynamic industries were cotton and metals.


Question 26.
With the expansion of railways, in England the demand for:
(a) Cotton and jute increased rapidly
(b) Cotton increased rapidly
(c) Iron and steel increased rapidly
(d) None of the above

Answer

Answer: (c) Iron and steel increased rapidly
Iron and steel industry developed with the help of railways and roadways. Thus, with the expansion of railways, the demand for iron and steel industries developed rapidly.


Question 27.
The Spinning Jenny was devised by:
(a) James Watt
(b) James Hargreaves
(c) Mathew Boultom
(d) Andrew Yule

Answer

Answer: (b) James Hargreaves
In 1764, the Spinning Jenny was devised by James Hargreaves. This machine speeded up the spinning process and reduced the demand for labour.


Question 28.
The steam engine produced by Newcomen was patented with a new engine by:
(a) James Scott
(b) James Chat
(c) James Watt
(d) none of the above

Answer

Answer: (c) James Watt
James Watt made some changes in the steam engine made by New comen.


Question 29.
At the beginning of the nineteenth century, there were no more than ……………………… steam engines.
(a) 299
(6) 320
(c) 321
(d) 319

Answer

Answer: (c) 321
There were no more than 321 steam engines at the beginning of the nineteenth century.


Question 30.
In 19th century Britain there was:
(a) Shortage of human labour
(b) No shortage of human labour
(c) Surplus human labour
(d) None of the above

Answer

Answer: (b) No shortage of human
labour
In Victorian Britain, labour was surplus and thus there was no shortage of human labour.


Write true (T) or false (F)

1. Rulers granted different quilds the monopoly right to produce and trade in specific products.

Answer

Answer: True


2. Merchants were based on towns and the work was mostly done in the towns.

Answer

Answer: False


3. London, at that time, came to be known as a finishing centre.

Answer

Answer: True


4. The proto-industrial system was a part of a network of commercial exchanges.

Answer

Answer: True


5. At each stage of production 30 to 35 workers were employed by each merchant.

Answer

Answer: False


6. In the late eighteenth century, the number of factories multiplied.

Answer

Answer: True


7. The first symbol of the new era was cotton.

Answer

Answer: True


8. By 1787, the import soared to 32 million pounds.

Answer

Answer: False


9. Richard Arkwright created the cotton mill.

Answer

Answer: True


10. In the late nineteenth century, factories became an intimate part of the English landscape.

Answer

Answer: False


11. The most dynamic industries in Britain were clearly cotton and metals.

Answer

Answer: True


12. By 1873, Britain was exporting iron and steel work about £ 77 million, double the value of its cotton export.

Answer

Answer: True


13. Technological changes spread rapidly across the industrial landscape.

Answer

Answer: False


14. At the late nineteenth century, there were no more than 321 steam engines all over England.

Answer

Answer: False


15. In Victorian Britain there was no shortage of human labour.

Answer

Answer: True


16. In many industries the demand for labour was seasonal.

Answer

Answer: True


17. Gas works and breweries were especially busy through out the hot months.

Answer

Answer: False


18. At the water front, winter was the time that ships were repaired and spruced up.

Answer

Answer: True


19. A range of products could be produced only with hand labour.

Answer

Answer: True


20. Machine-made goods were made for export to the colonies.

Answer

Answer: True


21. A abundance of labour in the market did not affect the lives of workers.

Answer

Answer: False


22. Seasonality of work in many industries meant prolonged periods without work.

Answer

Answer: True


23. Wages decreased somewhat in the early nineteenth century.

Answer

Answer: False


24. The fear of employment made workers hostile to the introduction of new technology.

Answer

Answer: True


25. After the 1850s, building activity intensified in the cities, opening up greater opportunities of employment.

Answer

Answer: False


26. Before the age of machine industries, silk and cotton goods from India dominated the international market in
textiles.

Answer

Answer: True


27. Supply merchants linked the port towi is to the inland regions.

Answer

Answer: True


28 By the 1760s, the network controlled by the Indian merchants was breaking down.

Answer

Answer: False


29. Trade through the new ports came to be controlled by European companies, and was carried in European ships.

Answer

Answer: True


30. The French, Dutch, Portuguese as well as the local traders competed in the market to secure woven cloth.

Answer

Answer: True


Match the following

1.

Column-I Column-II Column-III
1. In the late eighteenth century (a) the number of double the (A) metals
2. The most dynamic industries in Britaii (b) value of its (B) was seasonal
3. By 1873, Britain was exporting iron and steel (c) were cotton and (C) labour
4. In many industries the demand (d) for labour (D) factories multiplies
5. Industrialists usual preferred (e) hand (E) cotton export
Answer

Answer:

Column-I Column-II Column-III
1. In the late eighteenth century (a) the number of double the (D) factories multiplies
2. The most dynamic industries in Britaii (c) were cotton and (A) metals
3. By 1873, Britain was exporting iron and steel (b) value of its (E) cotton export
4. In many industries the demand (d) for labour (B) was seasonal
5. Industrialists usual preferred (e) hand (C) labour

2.

Column-A Column-B
1. Orient (а)  the early form of something.
2. Porto (b) a person who gathers cloth by pleating.
3. Stapler (c) the process in which fibres are prepared prior to spinning.
4. Fuller (d) a person who ‘staples’.
5. Carding (e) term referring to countries of Asia.
Answer

Answer:

Column-A Column-B
1. Orient (e) term referring to countries of Asia.
2. Porto (а)  the early form of something.
3. Stapler (d) a person who ‘staples’.
4. Fuller (b) a person who gathers cloth by pleating.
5. Carding (c) the process in which fibres are prepared prior to spinning.

3.

Column-A Column-B
1. Gomastha (a) trading ports
2. Spinning Jenny (b) 1854
3. Bombay and Calcutta (c) a spinning machine
4. First cotton mill came up in (d) 1860s
5. Elgin Mill started in Kanpur (e) a paid servant
Answer

Answer:

Column-A Column-B
1. Gomastha (e) a paid servant
2. Spinning Jenny (c) a spinning machine
3. Bombay and Calcutta (a) trading ports
4. First cotton mill came up in (b) 1854
5. Elgin Mill started in Kanpur (d) 1860s

Fill in the blanks

1. A range of ……………………… could be produced only with hand labour.

Answer

Answer: products


2. ……………………… products came to symbolize refinement and class.

Answer

Answer: Handmade


3. The ……………………… of labour in the market affected the lives of workers.

Answer

Answer: abundance


4. ……………………… of work in many industries meant prolonged periods without work.

Answer

Answer: Seasonality


5. Till the mid-nineteenth century, about ……………………… per cent of the urban population were extremely poor.

Answer

Answer: 10


6. The fear of ……………………… made workers hostile to the introduction of new technology.

Answer

Answer: unemployment


7. The spinning wheel was devised by James Hargreaves in ……………………… .

Answer

Answer: 1764


8. After the 1840s, ……………………… activity intensified in the cities, opening up greater opportunities of employment.

Answer

Answer: building


9. The number of workers employed in the transport industry doubled in the 1840s and doubled again in the subsequent ……………………… years.

Answer

Answer: 30


10. Before the age of machine industries, silk and cotton goods from ……………………… dominated the international market in textiles.

Answer

Answer: India


11. ……………………… cottons were produced in many countries, but the finer varieties often came from India.

Answer

Answer: Coarser


12. The French, ………………………, Portuguese as well as the local traders competed in the market to secure woven cloth.

Answer

Answer: Dutch


13. The company appointed a paid servant called the ……………………… to supervise weavers, collect supplies, and examine the quality of cloth.

Answer

Answer: gomastha


14. ………………………, a company official, had ventured to say that the demand for Indian textiles could never reduce, since no other nation produced goods of the same quality.

Answer

Answer: Henry Patullo


15. By the end of the nineteenth century weavers and ……………………… faced many problems.

Answer

Answer: Crafts people


16. By ……………………… four mills were at work with 94,000 spindles and 2150 looms.

Answer

Answer: 1862


17. In Bengal, ……………………… made his fortune in the China trade before he turned to industrial investment.

Answer

Answer: Dwarkanath Tagore


18. Some merchants from Madras traded with ……………………… .

Answer

Answer: Burma


19. Over 50 percent workers in the Bombay cotton industries in 1911 came from the neighbouring district of ……………………… .

Answer

Answer: Ratnagiri


20. Like the images of gods, figures of important ………………………, of emperors and Nawabs, adorned advertisement and calenders.

Answer

Answer: personages


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