The Little Busy Bee Summary Class 8 Karnataka Board

The Little Busy Bee Summary Class 8 Karnataka Board

English is a difficult subject for many people to learn. Some students may become frustrated and give up, but here’s The Little Busy Bee Summary Class 8 Karnataka Board to help you maintain your momentum! This The Little Busy Bee Summary will provide all necessary information needed in order to study KSEEB Class 8 English successfully at home or school.

The The Little Busy Bee Summary Class 8 Karnataka Board makes it easier to understand the story. Understanding every detail of a story is important for scoring higher on an exam and expert writers have made sure that you know how everything flows together by summarizing perfectly!

Summary

The hardworking bee makes good use of time, ft does not. waste of time. It collects honey from flowers every day. The bee builds its hive very skillfully. It constructs each cell of the hive with wax. Then it works very hard to store the cells with honey.

The poet says he also wants to be busy like the busy bee in work of labour or of skill. An old proverb says, ‘An idle mind is a devil’s workshop’. The poet says Satan, the evil spirit, makes the idle hands play mischief. A man without any work will think of some mischief or an evil thing to do.

The poet wishes to spend his early years profitably. He wants to involve himself in work or play or some good books. He likes to make each passing hour a useful one. So, in the end, he can give a good account of himself. He can confidently say that he had utilized the time fruitfully and had not wasted it in useless activities.

Theme

As the poem begins “How doth the little busy bee …” it shows it’s major plot revolves around the bee as a model of hard work. And pushing the readers to do similar hard work.

Line By Line Analysis

The bee is known for its work. Always it. works, so it is identified as a busy bee. It builds the hive very skillfully and stores sweet honey in it. The poet’s intention is, like the bee, we too must be busy and always do useful work. How does the little busy bee work? It makes | good use of time. It starts work when the sun rises i.e. in a shining hour. The worker bee starts j its work by collecting Honey from all the blooming flowers. All the bees collect nectar and carry it to the hive. The female worker bees are the only j bees that make nectar into honey. The bees build their cell very skillfully, spread j their wax neatly and work hard to store honey in the cell.

The poet speaks about himself and wants us to be like a busy bee in our work. We should! not be tempted to be idle or sit around doing | nothing. Satan in the poem refers to the devil, or some evil being who injures the idle person. The poet wants to spend his boyhood day by reading good books, playing and doing some good and useful work. Every human being could be. busy like a bee and do useful work. Bees build their hives skillfully. We too should do the work with our efficient skills.

Background of the poem The bee is very hardworking and stays busy. Or builds its hive very skillfully and stores sweet honey. Like the bee, we must also stay busy and always be productive.

About The Poem

The poet wonders as to how the little honey bee is so busy, how it becomes more energetic, and works even harder as the day goes by. He also wonders how it can gather honey all day long moving from flower to flower. The poet tells us that the female honey bee skilfully builds the cells inside the honeycomb.

About The Poet

Isaac Watts (1674-1748) was a famous English poet. He was born in Southampton, England. He was proficient in many languages. Also, he was a prolific and popular hymn writer. In this poem, the poet tells us how the bee works hard to collect honey and build its hive. We should learn from the bee and become hardworking and always do useful work.

It is important for a learner to read stories thoroughly and accurately in order to score better in KSEEB Class 8 English exams. The Little Busy Bee Summary Class 8 Karnataka Board has been given by experts to ensure that the story can be easily understood. Hope you found this The Little Busy Bee Summary Class 8 Karnataka Board helpful.

Beauty Poem Class 8 Questions And Answers (Extra Questions) Karnataka Board

Beauty Poem Class 8 Questions And Answers (Extra Questions) Karnataka Board

English is a difficult subject for many people to learn. Some students may become frustrated and give up, but here’s Beauty Poem Class 8 Extra Questions And Answers Karnataka Board to help you maintain your momentum! Beauty Poem Class 8 Questions And Answers (Extra Questions) Karnataka Board will provide all necessary information needed in order to study KSEEB Class 8 English successfully at home or school.

Beauty Poem Class 8 Questions And Answers (Extra Questions) Karnataka Board makes it easier to understand the story. Understanding every detail of a story is important for scoring higher on an exam and expert writers have made sure that you know how everything flows together by summarizing perfectly!

Extra Questions And Answers

Comprehension

1.
Beauty is in yourself,
Good deeds, happy thoughts
That repeat themselves
In your dreams
In your work,
And even in your rest.

How can beauty be in oneself? How do good deeds repeat themselves? What does ‘even’ state?

Answer

Beauty can be in oneself when it is inner beauty. Good deeds repeat themselves in dreams and actions. Usually, the state of rest is taken as the state of inaction when nothing fruitful happens. Hence the poet uses the word ‘even’ and argues that even in this passive state there can be beauty.

2.
Beauty is in yourself,
Good deeds, happy thoughts
That repeat themselves
In your dreams
In your work,
And even in your rest.
Where does real beauty lie? What does the phrase ‘repeat themselves’ mean here? Where is the inner beauty of a person shown?

Answer

Real beauty lies with us. The phrase ‘repeat themselves’ suggests that good deeds are the conscious choice of a person and do not happen by chance. They are not stray incidents of goodness. They are the outcome of a person’s purposeful choice to be good and to do good. In dreams, thoughts, and deeds, and even in rest, the inner beauty of a person is shown.

Multiple-Choice Questions:

Four alternatives are given for each of the following questions/ incomplete statements. Choose the most appropriate one.

Question 1.
Beauty can be seen

A) in the sunlight
B) in the moonlight
C) in dim light
D) None of these

Answer

A) in the sunlight

Question 2.
Beauty can be seen in

A) sunlight
B) trees
C) birds
D) all of the above

Answer

D) all of the above

Question 3.
How do people become beautiful?

A) By decorating their houses
B) By wearing beautiful dresses
C) By working in fields
D) By travelling to beautiful places

Answer

C) By working in fields

Question 4.
What makes people dance in the fields?

A) Good harvest
B) Beautiful scenes
C) Beautiful birds
D) Fresh air.

werAns

A) Good harvest

Question 5.
What does the word ‘harvest’ mean?

A) Hard work
B) Crop
C) Seed
D) Fertiliser.

Answer

B) Crop

Question 6.
When is beauty heard?

A) in the morning
B) in the evening
C) in the night
D) all the time.

Answer

C) in the night

Question 7.
How are sounds produced?

A) By blowing winds and falling raindrops
B) By children’s noise
C) By running vehicles on the road
D) By musical songs.

Answer

A) By blowing winds and falling raindrops

Question 8.
What effect does the blowing of winds and falling of raindrops create?

A) Depressing
B) Musical
C) Soothing
D) Monotonous.

Answer

B) Musical

Question 9.
“Or a singer singing anything in earnest”. The word ‘in earnest’ means

A) proudly
B) happily
C) sincerely
D) affectionately.

Answer

C) sincerely

Question 10.
What does the poet want to convey through the poem?

A) Beauty can be seen, heard, and practised.
B) Beauty is something that cannot be acquired.
C) Beauty is something that makes our life non- soothing.
D) One should not believe in outer beauty.

Answer

A) Beauty can be seen, heard, and practised.

Question 11.
The inner beauty of a person is shown in

A) his/her actions
B) his/her dreams
C) his work
D) all of the above.

Answer

D) all of the above.

Question 12.
What is common in good deeds and happy thoughts?

A) Both are not abstract.
B) Both are concrete.
C) They repeat themselves.
D) They don’t repeat themselves.

Answer

C) They repeat themselves.

Question 13.
Which of the following is not true?

A) Beauty is only external.
B) Beauty is only internal.
C) Beauty is both external and internal.
D) Beauty is neither external nor internal.
Ans

D) Beauty is neither external nor internal.

Question 14.
Why does the poet say that ‘Beauty is heard in the night’?

A) In the day time, we can see ugly things.
B) The night time is quiet and the sounds of nature are heard distinctly.
C) The night was more beautiful than the day.
D) None of the above.

Answer

B) The night time is quiet and the sounds of nature are heard distinctly.

Answer the following questions.

Question 1. How does the poet describe beauty during the day in the dusk, and within?
The poet E Yeh Shure says in her poem that beauty is everywhere. It’s in the sunlight, in the dark, in your dreams, in your work, and even in your rest. So beauty is everywhere. Beauty is everywhere you look, but it’s mostly on the inside and outside of you. Thus it is a straight forward poem which states that beauty is seen, beauty is heard, and beauty is in yourself. The poem also says that beauty is present at all times.

Question 2. The poet says, “Beauty is heard in …”. Can you hear beauty?
Yes, we can hear beauty. Beauty is something that makes us feel happy; beauty is something that makes us feel noble. So, sounds that make us feel happy and noble are things of beauty.

Question 3. What is beauty? Where can, in the poet’s opinion, beauty be seen, heard, and experienced?

E-Yeh-Shure in the poem ‘Beauty’ tells us that beauty is in everything that we come across in life. We needn’t go in search of beauty. Beauty can be heard and seen everywhere we go and can be anything we do. E-Yeh-Shure uses metaphors to show what beauty is. She says “Beauty is seen in sunlight, the trees.”

She says that beauty can be everywhere we look. E-Yeh-Shure repeats the tine “Beauty is…” and through this refrain, she tells us what and where beauty is. From “Corn growing and people working” to “wind sighing, rain falling,” beauty is everywhere. Moreover, E-Yeh-Shure makes us feel happy and confident by saying, “Beauty is in yourself.”

Question 4. How is the inner beauty of a person shown?

Dreams transform themselves into thoughts and thoughts into actions. Hence if the dreams themselves are beautiful, deeds would be noble and hence beautiful. Thus the inner beauty of a person is shown in his actions which are based on his inner self.

It is important for a learner to read stories thoroughly and accurately in order to score better in KSEEB Class 8 English exams. Beauty Poem Class 8 Extra Questions And Answers Karnataka Board has been given by experts to ensure that the story can be easily understood. Hope you found this Beaty Poem Class 8 Extra Questions And Answers Karnataka Board helpful.

Beauty Textbook Questions And Answers Chapter 1 Karnataka Board Class 8 

Beauty Textbook Questions And Answers Chapter 1 Karnataka Board Class 8

English is a difficult subject for many people to learn. Some students may become frustrated and give up, but here’s Beauty Textbook Questions And Answers Chapter 1 Karnataka Board Class 8  to help you maintain your momentum! Beauty Textbook Questions And Answers Chapter 1 Karnataka Board Class 8  will provide all necessary information needed in order to study KSEEB Class 8 English successfully at home or school.

Beauty Textbook Questions And Answers Chapter 1 Karnataka Board Class 8  makes it easier to understand the story. Understanding every detail of a story is important for scoring higher on an exam and expert writers have made sure that you know how everything flows together by summarizing perfectly!

Textbook Questions and Answers:

C1. Answer the following questions.

1. List out the things where beauty can be seen during the day.

Answer: Beauty is viewed during the day in sunlight, the trees, the birds, corn growing, people working, dancing for their harvest, and many more.

2. The poet says ‘beauty is heard in the night’. Pick out any two things of beauty from the poem that are seen at night.

Answer: The two things of beauty from the poem that are viewed at night are I. wind sighing II. rain falling etc.

3. Read the first and second stanzas of the poem again. Note the following phrases. Corn growing, people working or dancing, wind sighing, rain falling, a singer chanting.

These could be written as

Corn that is growing
People who are working or dancing.

Can you rewrite the other phrases like this? Why do you think the poet uses shorter phrases?

Answer: The poet uses shorter phrases for various reasons. First of all, shorter phrases fall under the category of Economy of Words. The economy of Words makes poetry effective. Such expressions also come under the category of Elliptical Expressions in which certain understood words are omitted. Such expressions which are used by writers make writing tight. And such a style also makes writing lyrical and this musical aspect is necessary for poetry.

4. The Poet says ‘Beauty is seen’ and ‘Beauty is heard’. List out the beautiful things you have seen or heard.

Answer: BEAUTY SEEN-The trees, the bird’s com growing people working or dancing, etc

BEAUTY HEARD-Wind sighing rain falling singer chanting etc.,

5. The poet says ‘Beauty is in yourself.’ What things does she mention here? When does she want us to follow them?

Answer: The poet says in the concluding stanza that beauty lies in ourselves; in good deeds, happy thoughts which are repeated in our dreams and our work and even in our rest.

6. Write a paragraph about beauty. You can use your own ideas along with the ideas in the poem.(You may discuss with your partner)

Answer: Beauty is defined on the quality or sum of qualities in a person or thing that gives pleasure to the senses or exalts the mind or spirit. Love pleases the mind, heart, and senses thus it is beautiful. Beauty can be patterns, knowledge, art, sounds, poetry or literature. And it is also said that “Beauty lies in the eyes of the beholder”. The idea of beauty is not the physical appearance of a person or object. Rather it is an understanding that gives some experience to one’s eyes, ears, intellect, and moral sense,

7. The phrase wind sighing’ is personification. Give two more examples of personification. You may take the help of your teacher.

Answer: The smiling flower, the weeping willows are two examples of personification.

It is important for a learner to read stories thoroughly and accurately in order to score better in KSEEB Class 8 English exams. Beauty Textbook Questions And Answers Chapter 1 Karnataka Board Class 8  has been given by experts to ensure that the story can be easily understood. Hope you found this Beauty Textbook Questions And Answers Chapter 1 Karnataka Board Class 8 helpful.

8th Class English Beauty Poem Summary Karnataka Board

8th Class English Beauty Poem Summary Karnataka Board

English is a difficult subject for many people to learn. Some students may become frustrated and give up, but here’s 8th Class English Beauty Poem Summary Karnataka Board to help you maintain your momentum! 8th Class English Beauty Poem Summary Karnataka Board will provide all necessary information needed in order to study KSEEB Class 8 English successfully at home or school.

8th Class English Beauty Poem Summary Karnataka Board makes it easier to understand the story. Understanding every detail of a story is important for scoring higher on an exam and expert writers have made sure that you know how everything flows together by summarizing perfectly!

Summary

The poet is trying to say in this poem that beauty is in everything. All the small things we do or the environment around us, everything has beauty in it. Everything has its own importance. All things are beautiful in their own unique way. Sunlight has its own beauty. Beauty can be seen in the growing corns, people who are working and dancing for getting a good harvest. Beauty is not only seen but can also be heard or felt.

For instance, when night falls, the wind blows slowly, the sound of rainfall, or when a singer sings. They all give pleasure to the mind and make it feel happy. Beauty is not just outside, it is within. Beautiful is the self. Our good deeds, happy thoughts please everyone are all beautiful. Our dreams are also beautiful as they give us reason to advance and work with zeal. Beauty is in your style of work, the way you take rest and sleep. Beauty is everywhere. It is in attitude, the way we look at things. Actually, everything is beautiful in its own unique manner, the need is to feel it.

About The Poet

Louise Abeita Chewiwi (E-Yeh-Shure or Blue Corn)(September 9, 1926 – July 21, 2014), was a Puebloan writer, poet, and educator, who was an enrolled member of Isleta Pueblo.

About The Poem

In this poem, beauty has been defined. The poet says that beauty is there in everything. All the small things we do or the environment around us, everything has beauty in it.

The Theme Of The Poem

One of the major themes is to admire the beauty around us.

The poet says that real beauty can be seen in the sunlight, trees, and birds, in corn-growing; people working or people dancing for the harvest. According to her beauty can be heard at night when the wind signs and when the rain falls and when a singer signs in earnest from the core of his heart.

The Imagery Of The Poem

The poem “Beauty” has several imageries in it. While reading the poem, we can easily imagine the scenes described in the poem. The words such as sun, trees, birds, night, wind sighing, and rain falling are various images in the minds of the readers.

The first stanza creates an image of scenery with trees, birds, sun, and cornfield in the readers’ mind.

The second stanza can create images such as a beautiful, cool, and/or rainy night in the reader’s mind.

Structure Of The Poem

The poem has three stanzas, and each talks about the beautiful things that could be seen, heard, and felt through the heart, respectively.

The first stanza talks about the beautiful things that could be seen in the day time, such as the trees, birds, people working in the fields, or them dancing for the harvest.

The second stanza talks about the wonderful things that could be heard through the night, such as the wind sighing, rain falling, or an earnest song by a singer. The third stanza talks about how beauty is inside us. Doing good deeds and having happy thoughts while working, dreaming, and resting will make us even more beautiful. Thus, the poem describes how beauty is present around and within us.

Line by line analysis

Beauty is seen

In the sunlight,

The trees, the birds,

Corn growing and people working

Or dancing for their harvest.

Corn: the chief cereal crop of wheat, oats, maize, barley etc.

Harvest: the time of the year when the crop is ready

Beauty is in the eyes of the beholder. It is the attitude of a person. Beauty is everywhere. It is visible in the Sunlight, the trees, the birds, the growing crops, people who dance to show their happiness when their crops are ready.

Beauty is heard

In the night,

Wind sighing, rain falling,

Or a singer chanting

Anything in earnest.

Earnest sincere and honest conviction

Sighing: the sound of a deep, loud breath or exhale taken in relief

Chanting: singing

Beauty is a thing to be felt. One can listen to it. Like one can hear its sound when night falls, when the wind blows and creates a sound when rain falls on the earth when a singer sings. One can even feel it the insincere and honest conviction of a person.

Beauty is in yourself.

Good deeds, happy thoughts

That repeat themselves

In your dreams,

In your work, And even in your rest.

Deeds: acts

Repeat: to happen again and again

Beauty is not always external or visible. It is within and it can be abstract also. One’s views, good acts, one’s wishes which one even imagine in dreams. Beauty can be one way of work or even the style of taking rest. Thus, beauty is very vast. It can not be limit to one thing, rather it is there in everything. We only need eyes and a heart to see it.

Conclusion

It is important for a learner to read stories thoroughly and accurately in order to score better in KSEEB Class 8 English exams. 8th Class English Beauty Poem Summary Karnataka Board has been given by experts to ensure that the story can be easily understood. Hope you found this 8th Class English Beauty Poem Summary Karnataka Board helpful.

The Boy Who Asked For More Extra Questions And Answers Karnataka Board Class 8

The Boy Who Asked For More Extra Questions And Answers Karnataka Board Class 8

English is a difficult subject for many people to learn. Some students may become frustrated and give up, but here’s The Boy Who Asked For More Extra Questions And Answers Karnataka Board Class 8 to help you maintain your momentum! The Boy Who Asked For More Extra Questions And Answers Karnataka Board Class 8 will provide all necessary information needed in order to study KSEEB Class 8 English successfully at home or school.

The Boy Who Asked For More Extra Questions And Answers Karnataka Board Class 8 makes it easier to understand the story. Understanding every detail of a story is important for scoring higher on an exam and expert writers have made sure that you know how everything flows together by summarizing perfectly!

Extra questions and answers

Question 1.

On what kind of night was Oliver born?

Answer:

Oliver was born on a cold, dark winter night.

Question 2.

When was Oliver born?

Answer:

Oliver was born in the year 1837.

Question 3.

Why does the author say that the baby would have cried still louder?

Answer:

The author thinks that, if the baby had known that he was an orphan in a poor house, he certainly would have cried still louder.

Question 4.

What name was given to the baby?

Answer:

The baby was named Oliver Twist.

Question 5.

Who named the baby?

Answer:

The town beadle Mr Bumble named the baby.

Question 6.

What did Mr Bumble think of himself?

Answer:

Mr Bumble thought himself a great man.

Question 7.

How did Oliver Twist look on his ninth birthday?

Answer:

Oliver looked pale and thin.

Question 8.

Who were Oliver’s companions?

Answer:

The other children who lived in the poorhouse were his companions.

Question 9.

Who brought Oliver trouble in the end?

Answer:

His companions brought him trouble in the end.

Question 10.

What had Oliver hardly known?

Answer:

He had not heard a kind word, or not seen a kind look.

Comprehension:

Read the following extracts and answer the questions that follow:

Question 1.

They persuaded him to ask for more’.

a) Who are ‘They’?

b) Who was persuaded to ask for more?

c) What was the result?

Answers:

a) ‘They’ are Oliver Twist’s friends or companions in the poor house.

b) Oliver Twist.

c) As a result, Oliver was locked in a room to spend the night alone and a notice was pasted offering five pounds to anyone who would take Oliver off their hands.

Question 2.

‘I never heard of such a thing! Depend on it, this miserable boy will be hung! ’

a) Who is the T?

b) What had he never heard of?

c) Why will the boy be hanged?

Answers:

a) Mr Bumble.

b) He had never heard of any boy asking for more gruel than what he was served.

c) Because he had committed the mistake of asking for more gruel to eat.

It is important for a learner to read stories thoroughly and accurately in order to score better in KSEEB Class 8 English exams. The Boy Who Asked For More Extra Questions And Answers Karnataka Board Class 8 has been given by experts to ensure that the story can be easily understood. Hope you found this The Boy Who Asked For More Extra Questions And Answers Karnataka Board Class 8 helpful.

The Boy Who Asked For More Textbook Questions And Answers Chapter 4 Karnataka Board Class 8

The Boy Who Asked For More Textbook Questions And Answers Chapter 4 Karnataka Board Class 8

English is a difficult subject for many people to learn. Some students may become frustrated and give up, but here’s The Boy Who Asked For More Textbook Questions And Answers Chapter 4 Karnataka Board Class 8 to help you maintain your momentum! This The Boy Who Asked For More Textbook Questions And Answers Chapter 4 Karnataka Board Class 8 will provide all necessary information needed in order to study KSEEB Class 8 English successfully at home or school.

The Boy Who Asked For More Textbook Questions And Answers Chapter 4 Karnataka Board Class 8 makes it easier to understand the story. Understanding every detail of a story is important for scoring higher on an exam and expert writers have made sure that you know how everything flows together by summarizing perfectly!

Textbook Questions and Answers:

C1. Answer the following questions and share your responses with your partner.

Question 1.

Where was Oliver Twist born?

Answer:

Oliver Twist was born in the poorhouse of a small town.

Question 2.

Who was present when Oliver was born?

Answer:

A doctor and an old poor woman were present at the time of Oliver’s birth.

Question 3.

What happened to the mother as soon as the child was born?

Answer:

Oliver’s mother died as soon as he was born.

Question 4.

What did the mother look like while she was alive?

Answer:

She was a good looking young woman.

Question 5.

Who was Mr Bumble?

Answer:

Mr Bumble was an officer in the town.

Question 6.

How did Mr Bumble treat the children?

Answer:

Mr Bumble starved and ill-treated the children under his case.

Question 7.

What did Oliver’s friends want him to ask the master?

Answer:

Oliver’s friends wanted him to ask the master for more gruel.

C2. Answer the following questions and share your responses with your partner.

Question 1.

How were the children fed in the house?

Answer:

The children were fed in a large stone hall. A metal basin with watery gruel would be kept at one end of the hall. The master stood by the basin and served each child with a small bowl of watery gruel.

Question 2.

Why was a council held by the boys? What did they decide on it?

Answer:

The children in the poor house never had enough to eat or drink. They were always hungry. One of the bigger boys announced that he would eat the boy who slept next to him if he was not given an extra bowl of gruel. The smaller boys were afraid. They held a council and decided that Oliver would go and ask the master for more gruel that night.

Question 3.

What did Oliver ask his master for?

Answer:

Oliver asked his master for some more gruel.

Question 4.

How did the master react to the request of Oliver?

Answer:

Though the master was a fat and healthy man, he turned very pale when he heard Oliver’s request. He said ‘What !’ as if he could not believe his ears.

Question 5.

What was the punishment that Oliver got for “asking for more”?

Answer:

Oliver was locked up in a room to spend the night alone.

Question 6.

What did Mr Bumble ultimately decide to do with Oliver?

Answer:

Mr Bumble decided to send Oliver out of the poorhouse. He offered a reward of five pounds to any person who would take Oliver permanently away from the poorhouse.

Question 7.

What was Oliver’s crime, according to Mr Bumble?

Answer:

In Mr Bumble’s opinion, asking for more food was the crime committed by Oliver.

C3. Read and discuss your responses with your partner. Then write.

Question 1.

Briefly explain the circumstances under which Oliver Twist was born.

Answer:

Oliver Twist was born to a poor woman of a little town on a cold black night in the winter of 1837.

Question 2.

How can you say that Oliver’s mother was a poor woman?

Answer:

Oliver’s mother was a young, good looking woman. She was found lying in the street of a small country town. Her shoes had been torn to pieces. No one knew where she had come from, or where she had been going.

Question 3.

What kind of a man was Mr Bumble?

Answer:

Mr Bumble was a cruel and selfish man. He thought very greatly of himself. He ill-treated and starved the children of the poor house.

Question 4.

Why were the boys always hungry?

Answer:

The boys were always hungry because they never got enough to eat or drink.

Question 5.

How did the children plan to satisfy their hunger?

Answer:

The children decided that Oliver should go to the master after supper and ask for more food.

Question 6.

What was the result of Oliver’s request for more food?

Answer:

Mr bumble came and Oliver was immediately locked in a room to spend the night alone. That was the punishment to Oliver for asking for more food.

Question 7.

Why did Mr Bumble get a notice posted outside the gate? Explain.

Answer:

Mr Bumble considered Oliver’s request for more food, a crime. He thought it was a revolt against his authority. He feared that the others would follow Oliver in the days to come, So, he wanted to force him out of the poor house.

Question 8.

Sum up Oliver’s birth and his life in the poorhouse.

Answer:

Oliver was born on a dark, cold winter night in the poor house of a small town. As soon as he was born, his mother died. He was taken into the poorhouse. Mr Bumble, the town beadle, gave him the name Oliver Twist. He and the other children were ill-treated and starved in that house. They did not get sufficient food to eat. They were always hungry. Oliver grew up to be a thin, pale boy of eight years. He was never treated kindly by anyone. He longed for kindness, compassion, and love.

Question 9.

Briefly narrate the events that led to Oliver being locked up in a room.

Answer:

As Oliver asked for more food, the master aimed a blow at his head, seized him by his arms, and called Mr Bumble. Mr Bumble came and Oliver was immediately locked in a room to spend the night alone.

C4. Match the descriptive words that go with the characters listed below.

Oliver Twist-

hungry, pale, thin, frightened, submissive

Oliver’s Mother-

Poor, miserable, good-looking

Mr Bumble-

fat, cruel, tyrannical

C5. Look at the following headings. Choose the best among them for the paragraphs indicated. Write them against the numbers.

Paragraph

1. Birth of an orphan.

2. Death of the mother.

3. Boy’s admission to the poorhouse.

4. Naming of the boy.

5. Boys holding a Council.

6. Oliver is forced to ask for more.

7. Mr Bumble’s reaction.

8. Punishment.

Vocabulary:

V1. Underline the word that does not belong to the group in each case.

farmer, farmer, doctor, teacher e.g. former

ate, swallowed, smelt, gulped

miserable, sad, agile, sorrowful

stated, said, narrated, heard

quickly, hastily, rudely, immediately

weak, pale, robust, thin.

Answer:

former

smelt

agile

heard

rudely

robust.

V2. Look at the following two words:

(i) appoint

(ii) appointment

The first is a verb and the second is a noun. We add ‘-meant to the verb and get the noun. Given below is a list of nouns. Some are made out of verbs. Pick out those words which are made out of verbs.

a) movement – g) measurement

b) cement – h) regiment

c) amazement – i) astonishment

d) development – j) government.

e) instrument – k) moment

f) establishment – l) garment.

Answer:

a) movement – c) amazement

d) development – f) establishment

g) measurement – i) astonishment

j) government.

V3. Write down the noun forms of the following verbs. They do not take the suffix ‘-ment’ ending. [You may consult a dictionary if you like]

e. g. invent — invention

i) born

ii) suggest

iii) exist

iv) grow

v) tire

vi) think

Answer:

i) born – birth

ii) suggest – a suggestion

iii) exist – existence

iv) grow – growth

v) tire – tiredness

vi) think – thought

C. Grammar:

Framing questions:

Task 1. Frame questions for the following statements. One is done for you.

A. Eg: Sujay and Supriya are Radha’s cousins.

Are Sujay and Supriya Radha’s cousins?

1. The pet dog is called Rambo.

2. The children are happy.

3. He is practising yoga.

Answers:

1. Is the pet dog called Rambo?

2. Are the children happy?

3. Is he practising yoga?

B. Eg: Radha likes sweets.

Does Radha like sweets?

1. She visits her aunt’s place every summer.

2. She loves playing with her cousins.

3. He likes reading storybooks.

Answers:

1. Does she visit her aunt’s place every summer?

2. Does she love playing with her cousins?

3. Does he like reading storybooks?

C. Eg: The children love playing with Rambo.

Do the children love playing with Rambo?

1. The kids practise yoga every morning.

2. Reshma and Rahim like to play with Raghu.

3. They enjoyed the vacation.

Answers:

1. Do the kids practice yoga every morning?

2. Do Reshma and Rahim like to play with Raghu?

3. Did they enjoy the vacation?

Task 2. Frame questions for the statements given below using the question words given in brackets. Do not forget to put the question mark.

This novel was written in 1946. (When)

The briefcase was stolen at the station. (Where)

The auditorium was constructed last year. (When)

The money was collected by the students. (By whom)

They have bought six plants for my garden. (How many)

His house was destroyed by fire. (How)

The servant let out the secret. (Who)

Sunder visits his parents twice a week. (How often)

You have selected this book. (which)

Janaki waited for two hours to consult the doctor. (How long)

It is his fault, (whose)

Answers:

When was this novel written?

Where was the briefcase stolen?

When was the auditorium constructed?

By whom was the money collected?

How many plants have they bought for my garden?

How was his house destroyed?

Who let out the secret?

How often does Sunder visit his parents?

Which book have you selected?

How long did Janaki wait to consult the doctor?

Whose fault is it?

D. Writing:

Task 1. Look at the following table. Some important facts about Ruskin Bond are given. Write a paragraph based on the information provided.

Answer:

Rudkin Bond, a famous novelist and storyteller, was born at Kasauli in Himachal Pradesh on 19 May 1934. He stays in Mussoorie. He is the author of many novels and short stories. His books have been translated into many European and Indian languages. Ruskin Bond was awarded the Kendra Sahitya Akademi Award in 1992.

It is important for a learner to read stories thoroughly and accurately in order to score better in KSEEB Class 8 English exams. The Boy Who Asked For More Textbook Questions And Answers Chapter 4 Karnataka Board Class 8 has been given by experts to ensure that the story can be easily understood. Hope you found this The Boy Who Asked For More Textbook Questions And Answers Chapter 4 Karnataka Board Class 8 helpful.

The Boy Who Asked For More Summary Chapter 4 Karnataka Board Class 8

The Boy Who Asked For More Summary Chapter 4 Karnataka Board Class 8

English is a difficult subject for many people to learn. Some students may become frustrated and give up, but here’s The Boy Who Asked For More Summary Chapter 4 Karnataka Board Class 8 to help you maintain your momentum! This The Boy Who Asked For More Summary Chapter 4 Karnataka Board Class 8 will provide all necessary information needed in order to study KSEEB Class 8 English successfully at home or school.

The Boy Who Asked For More Summary Chapter 4 Karnataka Board Class 8 makes it easier to understand the story. Understanding every detail of a story is important for scoring higher on an exam and expert writers have made sure that you know how everything flows together by summarizing perfectly!

Summary

Oliver was born in the poor house of a small town on a cold, black night in the winter of 1837. A doctor and a poor old woman were present at the time of his birth. Oliver’s mother was a young beautiful woman. She was found lying in the street in front of the poorhouse. Her shoes were torn, and it appeared that she had walked a long distance before she reached that place. Oliver’s mother died soon after his birth. No one knew who she was, where she had come from and where she was going to. So, Oliver stayed in the poor house as an orphan.

Mr Bumble, the town’s officer, named the baby Oliver Twist. Mr Bumble was in charge of the poorhouse. He starved and ill-treated the children. He was selfish, proud and cruel. Oliver grew up to be a pale, thin child. He longed for love. His friends were the other children who lived in the poorhouse.

The children were served food in a large, stone hall. The watery gruel was kept in a metal basin at one end of the hall. The master would stand beside the basin and serve each child with a small bowl of watery gruel. The children were always hungry because they did not get enough food to eat. One evening, one of the bigger boys declared that he would eat the boy who slept next to him if he did not get an extra bowl of gruel. The small boys believed him and they were afraid of him. They held a meeting of all the boys and persuaded Oliver to ask for more gruel after supper had been served.

Supper was served and the children drank it quickly. They forced Oliver to go and ask for more gruel. Oliver, with his bowl, went near the master and requested him to give him some more gruel. The fat master became pale. He could not believe his ears. Oliver repeated his request.

The master hit Oliver on his head. He caught hold of Oliver and called out for the beadle. Mr Bumble came running into the hall. He was terrified when he came to know of Oliver’s demand. He shouted at Oliver and said that he would be severely punished.

Oliver was locked up in a room to spend the night alone as a punishment for his courage and greed. Mr Bumble decided to send Oliver out of the poorhouse. He put up a notice on the outside of the gate the next morning. He offered a reward of five pounds to anyone who would take away Oliver from the poor¬house. In this way, Oliver’s friends became responsible for his expulsion from the poorhouse.

Theme

Qualities like kindness, love and compassion are the major theme of the story. This lesson is about a poor boy ‘Oliver’. His birth takes place in miserable conditions. His mother’s death adds to his misery. He was later named as ‘Oliver Twist by Mr Bumble, the town beadle, who was also in charge of the poor house. He starved and ill-treated the children who were under his care. The poor little boy’s plight in the poor house is highlighted. The sufferings of Oliver and the other orphans are dealt with, touchingly. One day circumstances lead Oliver to go forward and ask for more food. It was not for him but the sake of other orphans. Ultimately he was punished severely for doing so and was finally forced out of the poor house.

About the author

Charles Dickens (1812-1870) was one of the greatest English novelists. He was born in Portsmouth, England. He is famous for his criticism and attacks on social evils like child labour and cruelty meted out to children in institutions in England at that time. His famous works are: ‘The Pickwick Papers, ‘David Copperfield’, ‘ATale of Two Cities’, and ‘Great Expectations’. This lesson is an extract from his novel OliverTwist’.

It is important for a learner to read stories thoroughly and accurately in order to score better in KSEEB Class 8 English exams. The Boy Who Asked For More Summary Chapter 4 Karnataka Board Class 8 has been given by experts to ensure that the story can be easily understood. Hope you found this The Boy Who Asked For More Summary Chapter 4 Karnataka Board Class 8 helpful.

Jamaican Fragment Extra Questions And Answers Chapter 3 Karnataka Board Class 8

Jamaican Fragment Extra Questions And Answers Chapter 3 Karnataka Board Class 8

English is a difficult subject for many people to learn. Some students may become frustrated and give up, but here’s Jamaican Fragment Extra Questions And Answers Chapter 3 Karnataka Board Class 8 to help you maintain your momentum! This Jamaican Fragment Extra Questions And Answers Chapter 3 Karnataka Board Class 8 will provide all necessary information needed in order to study KSEEB Class 8 English successfully at home or school.

Jamaican Fragment Extra Questions And Answers Chapter 3 Karnataka Board Class 8 makes it easier to understand the story. Understanding every detail of a story is important for scoring higher on an exam and expert writers have made sure that you know how everything flows together by summarizing perfectly!

Extra Questions and Answers

Question 1.

Why did the game in the morning amaze the narrator?

OR

‘I puzzled within myself says the narrator. What conclusion did he come to after this puzzling thought?

OR

What conclusions did the narrator reach, looking at the two boys playing the game?

Answer:

The game in the morning both amazed and upset the narrator. Although it seemed to be a simple game of master and servant, the narrator was surprised that the dark boy, despite being older and stronger, was playing the servant. This was despite their equal social status. This makes the narrator wonder whether the Jamaicans considered themselves inferior and accepted the superiority of the whites even as children.

Question 2.

On the second day, the narrator smiled as he remembered something. What made him laugh again?

Answer:

After the second day’s experience, the author is aware that the boys are only playing a game without any racial implications. He smiles as he remembers that he too, as a small boy, used to play such games. When he looks at the white man watching the game, he presumes that the white man too would be making the same mistake as that of the author, wondering whether the black race is superior to the white. This makes him laugh.

Question 3.

What, according to the author A.L. Hendricks, did the little boy sense in the game?

Answer:

The author A.L. Hendricks watches the game of a black boy and a white boy and notices that the black boy is taking orders from the white boy. The author then wonders whether the black boy, even before growing up, has accepted the superiority of the whites and is prepared to follow their orders even when he is in his own country.

Question 4.

“Could he, at his age, divine a difference between himself and the white boy?” What are the differences that are referred to by the author?

Answer:

The differences the black boy perhaps felt even as a child were the inferiority of the blacks when compared to the superiority of the whites and their acceptance of the domination of the whites over them in their own country.

Question 5.

will save him this puzzle’. What did the narrator think the man would puzzle all day? Was the narrator right?

Answer:

The narrator thinks that the white man watching the two boys play would make the same mistake that he had made the previous day. On the second day, since the white boy was playing the role of a servant, the author thinks that the white man would puzzle over the possible superiority of the blacks over the whites. He is wrong in his assumption because the white man is the father of the two boys and knows fully well that the boys are only playing a game.

Question 6.

Why does the author say that the game the children played on the first morning puzzled him?

Answer:

The game the children played on the first morning puzzled the narrator. He saw two boys – one dark and one white – playing the game of giving and taking orders. Their clothes indicated that they belonged to the same social order. Yet, surprisingly, the older of the two was playing the role of a servant. Since the older boy happened to be a Jamaican, the author wondered why he had accepted the inferior role even though he was older and physically stronger.

The author was disheartened by the doubt that the dark boy would have accepted the role of a servant because of the feeling of being inferior, in the presence of the white. This feeling of inferiority might have made him accept orders from the white in his own country. This possible psychological domination of the whites over the blacks and the possibility of this power game influencing even small children both puzzled and upset the author.

With what thoughts did the author go to the white man?

Answer:

The author went to the white man with the thought of setting his wrong ideas right. He knows that he was wrong in jumping to conclusions about the game of the little children. He doesn’t want another adult to make the same mistake. If he was worried over the black boy’s acceptance of his inferiority so young in life, the previous day, the author thinks, the white man would be worried over the white boy’s inferior role the next day. The author wants to clear this misconception because by now he knows that only adults are guilty of such thoughts and not children.

Comprehension:

Read the following extracts and answer the questions that follow:

Question 1. I will save him this puzzle.

a) Who is the T?

b) Who is ‘him’?

c) What does the author want to tell the white man?

Answer.

a) The author, A.L. Hendricks.

b) The white man.

c) The author wants to tell the white man that the two boys were only playing a game.

Question 2. “I smiled. My spirit laughed at me.”

a) Who smiled?

b) To whom do I refer?

c) Why is the author happy?

Answer.

a) The author.

b) The author.

c) The author is happy because the whites and blacks were living together happily in Jamaica.

It is important for a learner to read stories thoroughly and accurately in order to score better in KSEEB Class 8 English exams. Jamaican Fragment Extra Questions And Answers Chapter 3 Karnataka Board Class 8 has been given by experts to ensure that the story can be easily understood. Hope you found this Jamaican Fragment Extra Questions And Answers Chapter 3 Karnataka Board Class 8 helpful.

Jamaican Fragment Textbook Questions And Answers Chapter 3 Karnataka Board Class 8

Jamaican Fragment Textbook Questions And Answers Chapter 3 Karnataka Board Class 8

English is a difficult subject for many people to learn. Some students may become frustrated and give up, but here’s Jamaican Fragment Textbook Questions And Answers Chapter 3 Karnataka Board Class 8 to help you maintain your momentum! Jamaican Fragment Textbook Questions And Answers Chapter 3 Karnataka Board Class 8 will provide all necessary information needed in order to study KSEEB Class 8 English successfully at home or school.

Jamaican Fragment Textbook Questions And Answers Chapter 3 Karnataka Board Class 8 makes it easier to understand the story. Understanding every detail of a story is important for scoring higher on an exam and expert writers have made sure that you know how everything flows together by summarizing perfectly!

IRA – Look at the map and the information (refer to the text). Then, answer the questions that follow.

Question 1.

What is the area of Jamaica?

Answer.

The area of Jamaica is 10957 sq. km.

Question 2.

Which are the major towns and cities in Jamaica?

Answer.

The major towns and cities in Jamaica are Montero Bay, Spanish Town, St. Andre, Portmore.

Question 3.

Name at least two political parties of Jamaica.

Answer.

Two political parties of Jamaica are the Jamaica Labour Party and the People’s National Party.

Question 4.

What is the population of Jamaica?

Answer.

The population of Jamaica is 24,47,000.

Question 5.

When was slavery abolished in Jamaica?

Answer.

Slavery was abolished in 1838 in Jamaica.

Textbook Questions and Answers

C1. Answer the following questions and share your responses with your partner.

Question1.

Why was the morning walk pleasant to Mr A.L. Hendricks?

Answer.

The red and green-roofed bungalows, green lawns and gardens on either side of his walking lane makes him happy. The scenery is beautiful. So he felt it was pleasant.

Question 2.

“The exercise is good for me”, says the narrator. What was that exercise?

Answer.

The narrator walked from his home to the rail track lines every morning. He returned home every evening on foot. The exercise was good for his mind and body.

Question 3.

What did the narrator notice one morning?

Answer.

One morning the narrator noticed two boys playing in the garden of a cottage.

Question 4.

How did the smaller boy behave while playing with the bigger boy?

Answer.

The smaller white boy behaved like a master. He walked majestically up and down, commanding the black boy.

C2. Answer the following questions and share your responses with your partner.

Question 1.

What sight surprised the narrator the next day?

Answer.

The next day when the narrator observed the boys, to his surprise the black boy was commanding and the little white boy did everything.

Question 2.

What were the two commands given by the black boy to the white boy?

Answer.

The two commands given by the black boy to the white boy were

1. Get me a banana? and

2. Peel it for them

Question 3.

Why was the white man surprised at the narrator’s outburst?

Answer.

The white man was surprised at the narrator’s outburst because the narrator misinterprets the children’s play and with prejudice, he thought too extremely and suffered a lot within himself. All these are said in one stretch.

Question 4.

Why do you think the narrator smiled in the end?

Answer.

The narrator smiled at the end because the white man’s wife was brown and his two sons were the same as their parents, just a contrast of colour.

C3. Some statements are given below. Some are true and some are false. Write ‘T’ or ‘F’ in the box provided against each sentence accordingly.

Question 1.

The bigger boy was black.

True

Question 2.

The black boy ordered the white boy to pick up that stick.

False

Question 3.

The white boy sat down on the lawn.

True

Question 4.

The two boys have not dressed alike.

False

Question 5.

The little boys were playing when the narrator passed by in the afternoon.

False

Question 6.

The next day, a man was playing with the boys.

False

Question 7.

The game that the two boys played was the same game the author had played during his childhood.

True

Question 8.

“I know what you are thinking”, said the man standing at the gate to the narrator.

False

Question 9.

The father of the boys was white and the mother brown.

True

Question 10.

92% of Jamaica is inhabited by blacks.

True

C4. For each of the statements, four alternatives are given as the answers. Choose the best alternative.

Question 1. The two boys in the story are

a) good friends

b) brothers

c) neighbours

d) classmates.

Answer.

b) Brothers.

Question 2. The commands that the white boy gave the black boy were-

a) five in number

b) four in number

c) three in number

d) two in number.

Answer.

c) Three in number

Question 3. The black boy had a mat of coarse hair on his head. Coarse means

a) rough

b) beautiful

c) nice

d) long.

Answer.

a) Rough.

Question 4. “Only we grown-ups are silly”. The question tag to this statement is

a) aren’t we?

b) isn’t it?

c) are we?

d) is it?

Answer.

a) aren’t we?

Question 5. The white boy had hazel eyes, ‘hazel’ means

a) reddish-brown

b) pale brown

c) yellowish-brown

d) bluish brown.

Answer.

a) Reddish-brown.

C5 Read and discuss your responses with your partner. Then write.

Question 1. What similarities and differences can you make out between the two boys?

Answer.

The narrator finds both similarities and differences between the two boys. Both were small, around four and five years of age, and were dressed in blue shirts and khaki pants. Both had bare, muddy feet. But, there were marked differences too. The bigger boy was very dark and sturdy with coarse hair and coal-black eyes appearing to be a Jamaican. The smaller boy was also sturdy, but he was white with hazel eyes and light brown hair.

Question 2. (a) What two commands did the big boy give the small boy?

Answer.

The big boy ordered the small boy to get him a banana. When the white boy brought him a banana, he asked him to feel it for him.

Question 2. (b) What three commands did the small boy give the big boy?

Answer.

The smalt boy first ordered the big boy to pick up a stick, then to jump into the flowers and finally to get him some water.

Question 3. The author could find no answer to some questions. Which are those questions?

Answer.

The author could not find an answer to these questions:
1. If the boy had sensed that he would be a servant of the white man in his own country.

2. If he could make a difference between himself and the white boy.

3. If the white boy was going to boss over the black boy.

Question 4. Why was the narrator surprised the next morning?

Answer.

The next morning the narrator was surprised to see that the scene is completely changed. The Previous day the white boy was boss and commanding but now was walked obediently behind the black boy. Similarly, the black boy who was obediently following the commands was now commanding the white boy.

Question 5. How did the two boys behave while playing?

Answer.

The two boys took the Boss and slave role alternatively. According to their role, they performed well. That is, in the Boss role they Commanded and in the Slave role they submitted themselves and did the commands obediently. Thus they behave like this while playing.

Question 6. What made the narrator think that the black boy could be the son of a servant or a classmate of the white boy?

Answer.

The big boy obeyed the orders of the white boy without any complaint. This made the narrator think that he was the son of a house servant. But, when he saw that both the boys were dressed in blue shirts and khaki pants, he presumed that they could be classmates.

Question 7. What were the two points that the narrator wanted to clarify to the white man?

Answer.

The two points that the narrator wanted to clarify to the white man, are

1. One day or the other, the blacks will rule over the whites and

2. That’s only a game.

Question 8. The two boys, though brothers, differed in their colour. What might be the reason?

Answer.

Their parents belonged to different races. Their father was a white man and his mother was dark.

Question 9. If you were the white man, how would you react to the narrator’s comment?

Answer.

If I were the white man, I would have also behaved like the white man.

Vocabulary:

V1. Column ‘A’ has the names of countries. Choose the correct nationality from the list given below and write in Column ‘B’.

V2. Guess and write the meanings of the words underlined, in the table given below:

1. The stipulated period of twelve years was coming to a close.

2. How can I perform the fire sacrifice?

3. Pandavas wanted to quench their thirst. They went in search of water.

4. After seeing all brothers lying dead, Yudhisthira was drowned in sorrow.

5. Yaksha was pleased with the answers given by Yudhisthira.

V3. Read the following conversation and use the appropriate word from the ones given in brackets.

Patient: Doctor, the wound in my ______ pains me a lot [heel, heal]

Doctor: Don’t worry, it will ______ up after treatment [heel, heal]

You are diabetic and ________, so it may take one ______ [weak, week]

Patient: Excuse me, a word with you doctor.

I don’t know whether it is ____ to ask you this question. [fair, fare]

Doctor: Oh! Don’t worry. Tell me what it is.

Patient: I have no money to pay the bus _____ [fair, fare]

I’m sorry doctor. I forgot to tell you that. _____ week I ____ your prescription [last, lost]

Doctor: OK. No problem. I’ll give you both.

Answer:

1. Patient: Doctor, the wound in my heel pains me a lot.

2. Doctor: Don’t worry, it will heal up after treatment.

You are diabetic and weak, so it may take one s week.

3. Patient: Excuse me, a word with your doctor. I don’t know whether it is fair to ask you this question.

4. Doctor: Oh! Don’t worry. Tell me what it is.

5. Patient: I have no money to pay the bus fare.

I’m sorry doctor. I forgot to tell you that last week I lost your prescription.

6. Doctor: Ok. No problem. I’ll give you both.

V4. Fill in the blanks with words that have similar pronunciation as the words underlined.

1. Papanna and Somanna are good friends. The former is a _______ and the latter is a businessman.

2. The thief wanted to steal. But the doors were locked. He broke open the lock with a ______ rod.

3. “Come here,” said the teacher. But the student did not ____

4. “Mandanna, your answer is quite right. But, for a moment will you keep ______?”

5. Rashmi gave birth to a male child in Bengaluru. Her husband who was in Mysuru came to Bengaluru by the ____ train.

Answer:

1. farmer

2. steel

3. hear

4. quiet

5. mail.

V5. We can form opposites by adding prefixes to words.

Similarly, add prefixes to the underlined words to get their opposites.

1. Sunitha is regular to the class, but Sushma is _______

2. Rama Murthy’s answer is correct, but Narayan’s is _____

3. Sita’s way of expressing facts is proper, but Lakshmi’s is ___________

4. All should respect the National Flag. No one should __________ it.

5. The competition was very tough. It was Rahul’s fortune that he won, but it was Sanjay’s _______ that he lost.

Answer:

1. irregular

2. incorrect

3. improper

4. disrespect

5. misfortune.

A. Listen and Speak:

Father, art, master, past, are, smart.

C. Reading:

Skimming:

D. Grammar:

The Past Tense, The Past Perfect

1. had died

2. had already begun

3. had walked

4. had been

5. had not stopped yet.

E. Writing:

Answer:

1 – c, 2 – e, 3 – d, 4 – a.

Task 2. Look at the following advertisement carefully and answer the questions below.

Answer:

a) Mega Garments

b) A T. Shirt worth Rs. 200 free on a purchase worth Rs. 1000.

c) Shirts, trousers, jackets, and jeans.

d) With an attractive offer.

It is important for a learner to read stories thoroughly and accurately in order to score better in KSEEB Class 8 English exams. Jamaican Fragment Extra Questions And Answers Chapter 3 Karnataka Board Class 8 has been given by experts to ensure that the story can be easily understood. Hope you found this Jamaican Fragment Extra Questions And Answers Chapter 3 Karnataka Board Class 8 helpful.

Jamaican Fragment Summary Chapter 3 Karnataka Board Class 8

Jamaican Fragment Summary Chapter 3 Karnataka Board Class 8

English is a difficult subject for many people to learn. Some students may become frustrated and give up, but here’s Jamaican Fragment Summary Chapter 3 Karnataka Board Class 8 to help you maintain your momentum! Jamaican Fragment Summary Chapter 3 Karnataka Board Class 8 will provide all necessary information needed in order to study KSEEB Class 8 English successfully at home or school.

Jamaican Fragment Summary Chapter 3 Karnataka Board Class 8 makes it easier to understand the story. Understanding every detail of a story is important for scoring higher on an exam and expert writers have made sure that you know how everything flows together by summarizing perfectly!

Summary

The author used to walk a half-mile every morning from his home to the rail track lines, and from the rail track lines back to his house every evening. It used to be a pleasant walk because he could enjoy the scenery. It was a good exercise also. Sometimes, the walk would be educative. He would learn new things from incidents that happened around him.

One morning, on his way to the rail track lines, he saw two boys playing in the garden of a small house. Both of them were very little boys. One was four years old and the other for about five years. The bigger of the two boys was strong, very dark with coal-black eyes and coarse black hair.

The small boy was also sturdy. He was white with hazel eyes and light brown hair. Both were wearing blue shirts and khaki pants. They did not wear shoes. Their feet were muddy as they were playing in the mud.

They were unaware of the author watching them. The small white boy walked up and down majestically. The bigger brown boy followed him and did what he was told to do. The white boy told the dark boy to pick up a stick. The dark boy picked it up. Then the white boy asked him to jump into the flowers, and he did so. Again, the white boy ordered the dark boy to fetch him some water. The dark boy ran into the house to bring water.

The author was surprised to see the white boy imposing his will on the black boy. He was almost commanding the black boy, and the black boy meekly submitted himself. The author thought that the black boy must be the son of a house servant. Since both of them were dressed in the same kind of clothes, he again thought that they must be neighbours. He wondered why the dark boy faithfully obeyed the white boy’s orders. The author, himself being a Jamaican, was sad that the Jamaican boy had accepted the supremacy of the whites even in his own country.

The next morning the narrator saw the boys again. A man was watching them play. He was surprised to see that the black boy was commanding and the little white boy was carrying out his orders. The dark boy walked imperiously up and down and the white boy followed him obediently. The dark boy asked the white boy to get him a banana. The white boy ran inside and came out with a banana. The little black fellow ordered the white boy to peel it for him and the white boy did so and gave it to his dark master.

The narrator then realized that they were playing a game, which he had also played in his childhood. He looked at the man standing beside the gate. He was a white man. The narrator thought that the white man would be thinking on the same lines as he had, the previous day. He went to the white man and tried to drive away his doubts by telling him that the children were only playing. The narrator told the white man that only the grown-up people were silly to think in terms of racial discrimination.

The white man smiled. He told the narrator that he knew all about the children’s game. He said that the boys were his sons and they were brothers. And he pointed to the fair brown woman on the verandah and said that she was his wife. The narrator felt very happy and proud that Jamaica brought people from different communities and cultures together. The white man smiled and said if they did not hurry they would miss the train and went away.

Theme

The theme of the story is a great life lesson. It explains to us that we can’t just jump to the first thing we think of when we see something. For example, the character in the story was thinking that it was racism that he was watching. But it was just two kids playing a simple game. The main idea of the story is that the character was thinking the 4-year-old Caucasian was forcing the 5-year-old African heritage to do whatever he commands. But it was nothing like that.

About the author

Arthur Lemiere Hendricks was born in 1922 in Kingston, Jamaica. He is a West Indian poet and short story writer. He worked as a Broadcasting Director. In all his writings we can find the taste of Caribbean Literature. In the story ‘Jamaican Fragment’, he tells us how people in his country had preconceived ideas of superiority and inferiority about colour, race and class.

It is important for a learner to read stories thoroughly and accurately in order to score better in KSEEB Class 8 English exams. Jamaican Fragment Summary Chapter 3 Karnataka Board Class 8 has been given by experts to ensure that the story can be easily understood. Hope you found this Jamaican Fragment Summary Chapter 3 Karnataka Board Class 8 helpful.

Sir C V Raman Extra Questions And Answers Chapter 2 Karnataka Board Class 8

Sir C V Raman Extra Questions And Answers Chapter 2 Karnataka Board Class 8

English is a difficult subject for many people to learn. Some students may become frustrated and give up, but here’s Sir C V Raman Extra Questions And Answers Chapter 2 Karnataka Board Class 8 to help you maintain your momentum! Sir C V Raman Extra Questions And Answers Chapter 2 Karnataka Board Class 8 will provide all necessary information needed in order to study KSEEB Class 8 English successfully at home or school.

Sir C V Raman Extra Questions And Answers Chapter 2 Karnataka Board Class 8 makes it easier to understand the story. Understanding every detail of a story is important for scoring higher on an exam and expert writers have made sure that you know how everything flows together by summarizing perfectly!

Extra Questions and Answers

Question 1.

When was Sir C.V. Raman born?D

Answer:

Raman was born on November 7, 1888.

Question 2.

Where was Sir C.V. Raman born?

Answer:

Raman was born in Tiruchirapally (Trichy).

Question 3.

What was C.V. Raman’s father?

Answer:

C.V. Raman’s father Chandrashekara Iyer was a Professor of Physics at Hindu College, Vishakapatnam.

Question 4.

Where did C.V. Raman have his high school education?

Answer:

C.V. Raman studied in the Hindu College High School, Vishakhapatnam.

Question 5.

Which subject did he choose to study for his B.A. and M.A.?

Answer:

Raman chose Physics as his special subject for his B.A. and M.A. degrees.

Question 6.

Who advised Raman to appear for the competitive examination?

Answer:

His relatives advised Raman to take the competitive examination.

Question 7.

Which subjects did Raman study for the competitive examination?

Answer:

Raman studied History and Economics.

Question 8.

What post did he get after securing first place in the competitive examination?

Answer:

He got the post of Deputy Accountant General, in 1907, at Calcutta.

Question 9.

When did he become Special Accountant General for Posts and Telegraphs in Calcutta?

Answer:

Raman became Special Accountant General for Posts and Telegraphs in Calcutta in 1991.

Question 10.

What post was offered to him when he was the Special Accountant General?

Answer:

He was offered the post of Professor of Physics at Calcutta University.

Question 11.

What made him take up research on the scattering of light?

Answer:

On his voyage to Europe, Raman saw the blue water of the Mediterranean Sea. This made him take up research on the scattering of light in liquids.

Question 12.

When did Raman get the Nobel Prize?

Answer:

Raman got the Nobel Prize in 1930.

Question 13.

What is Raman’s discovery known as?

Answer:

Raman’s discovery is known as the “Raman Effect”.

Question 14.

How did the Government of India honour him?

Answer:

The Government of India honoured him with the highest civilian award, Bharat Ratna, in 1954.

Multiple Choice Questions

Four alternatives are given for each of the following questions / incomplete statements. Choose the most appropriate one.

Question 1.

For his work on scattering of light and the Raman Effect, C. V. Raman was awarded the

A) Knighthood

B) Nobel Prize

C) Bharatha Ratna

D) International Lenin Prize

Answer:

B) Nobel Prize

Question 2.

C. V. Raman was born at

A) Vishakapatnam

B) Madras

C) Calcutta

D) Trichy

Answer:

D) Trichy

Question 3.

Raman Institute was the brainchild of

A) Parvathi Ammal

B) Chandrashekhara Iyer

C) C.V. Raman

D) Rabindranath Tagore

Answer:

C) C.V. Raman

Question 4.

Even as a boy he had made the model of a

A) dynamo

B) motor

C) machine

D) engine

Answer:

A) dynamo

Question 5.

After his M.A., Raman wanted to go to

A) U.S.A.

B) Calcutta

C) Madras

D) the United Kingdom

Answer:

D) the United Kingdom

Question 6.

After getting the first place in the competitive examination, Raman was appointed

A) Deputy Accountant General

B) Special Accountant General

C) Director of Indian Institute of Science

D) Professor at Calcutta University

Answer:

A) Deputy Accountant General

Question 7.

Raman felt like a fish out of water in his new post. The above idiom means

A) he was comfortable in his new post

B) he liked his job very much

C) he was unhappy with his new post

D) he looked like a fish.

Answer:

C) he was unhappy with his new post

Question 8.

Raman gave up the highly paid post of the Special Accountant General and accepted a professorship at Calcutta University because

A) he loved teaching

B) he did not know accounts

C) he loved science

D) he wanted to start the Raman Research Institute there

Answer:

C) he loved science

Question 9.

Raman resigned the post of Director of Indian Institute of Science because

A) he was appointed professor at Calcutta University

B) he became the Director of Raman Research Institute

C) he took up research on the Mediterranean Sea

D) he was appointed Special Accountant General for Posts and Telegraphs

Answer:

B) he became the Director of Raman Research Institute

Question 10.

Raman’s voyage on the Mediterranean Sea led to the discovery of

A) Water cycle

B) Laws of Light

C) dynamo

D) Raman Effect

Answer:

D) Raman Effect

Question 11.

Raman admitted the candidate to the Raman Research Institute though he had not done well in the tests because

A) the candidate did not ask for a travelling allowance

B) there were no students in the institute

C) Raman liked the candidate’s honesty

D) Raman wanted to teach him Physics

Answer:

C) Raman liked the candidate’s honesty

Question 12.

Raman was awarded the Nobel Prize in

A) 1930

B) 1954

C) 1929

D) 1957

Answer:

A) 1930

Question 13.

C. V. Raman became Sir C. V. Raman after he was

A) awarded the Bharatha Ratna

B) awarded the International Lenin Prize

C) conferred Doctorates by a number of universities

D) Knighted by King George V

Answer:

D) Knighted by King George V

Question 14.

Who awarded C. V. Raman ‘The International Peace Prize’?

A) U.S.A.

B) England

C) the Soviet Union

D) France.

Answer:

C) the Soviet Union

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