Critical Analysis And Line By Line Explanation Of The Twins By Henry Sambrooke Leigh Class 10 English Maharashtra Board 

Critical Analysis And Line By Line Explanation Of The Twins By Henry Sambrooke Leigh Class 10 English Maharashtra Board

In this, you are going to go through Critical Analysis And Line By Line Explanation Of The Twins By Henry Sambrooke Leigh Class 10 English Maharashtra Board. Understanding a text meticulously in its totality is very important for a learner for scoring better in the Maharashtra board exam. Experts made ample to ensure a thorough critical and line-by-line analysis. Let us find Critical Analysis And Line By Line Explanation Of The Twins By Henry Sambrooke Leigh Class 10 English Maharashtra Board.

Critical Analysis And Line By Line Explanation Of The Twins By Henry Sambrooke Leigh

About the poet

Henry Sambrooke Leigh was a writer, a playwright, singer, french scholar, brilliant, etc. He was born on 29th March in London. At a very early age, he engaged himself in writing. His verses were very fluent and straightforward. He has translated many French Verses. For the theatre Royal, his theatrical essay was in collaboration. His “The Prince Methusalem” was a complete failure at Folies Dramatiques.

Henry Sambrooke Leigh’s collection of lyrics were at ‘Carols of Cockayne’, ‘Gillott and Goosequill’, ‘A Town Garland. He was prayed for his fluent verse but was also described as being of slender merit. Huge collections were published between 1860- 1880.

Henry’s poem “The Twins” has famous among all the students; they liked it. It was the kind of poetry that a parent would readout for their twins.

About the poem

In the poem “The Twins,” the poet Henry Sambrooke Leigh talks about how he is suffering the entire life because of his twin. He exclaims how he gets unfairly treated because of his brother’s foolishness, once he got punished for his brother. The poem talks about the twins in a light-hearted manner and with comedy. He also shows his part of tension if his wife would marry his brother out of confusion or what would happen if any one dies, who will help the people burry. The people weren’t so foolish to bury the other one, and he created a comedy element.

Throughout the poem, he exclaims his sorrow. He shows how the twins face problems. He was so annoyed with that situation that he started asking his readers “What would you do if you were me,

To prove that you were you?”.
Structure of the poem

In the form and the feature, face, and limb,
I grew so like my brother,
That folk got taking me for him,
And each for one another.
It puzzled all our kith and kin,
It reached a fearful pitch;
For one of us was born a twin,
Yet not a soul knew which.
One day, to make the matter worse,
Before our names were fixed,
As the nurse was washing us,
We got utterly mixed;
And thus, you see by fate’s decree,
Or rather a nurse’s whim.
My brother John got christened me,
And I got christened him.
This Fatal likeness even dogged
My footsteps, when at school,
And I was always getting flogged,
For John turned out a fool.
I put this Question, fruitlessly,
To everyone I knew,
‘What would you do, if you were me,
To prove that you were you?’
Our close resemblance turned the tide
Of my domestic life,
For somehow, my intended bride
Became my brother’s wife.
In fact, year after year the same
Absurd mistakes went on,
And when I died, the neighbours came
And buried John.

The poem consists of 4 stanzas, each with eight lines. The rhyme scheme, followed by the entire poem, is ababcdcd. The rhyming plan is used to make the stanza melodious. There is a perfect use of hyperbole, and humour are used to emphasize its main points.

Analysis Of The Poem

In the form and the feature, face, and limb,
I grew so like my brother,
That folk got taking me for him,
And each for one another.
It puzzled all our kith and kin,
It reached a fearful pitch;
For one of us was born a twin,
Yet not a soul knew which.

In the poem, the poet explains or says what sort of problems do twins face. The poet was one of the twins who faced many difficulties in the entire life due to similar features. He and his brother were identical in every aspect, like living style, look, etc. Others mind find it interesting, but it was tough for him to adjust. Every time others used to confuse them and this confusion lasted throughout life.

One day, to make the matter worse,
Before our names were fixed,
As a nurse was washing us,
We got utterly mixed;
And thus, you see by fate’s decree,
Or rather the nurse’s whim.
My brother John got christened me,
And I got christened him.

The poet says how worst they had to face. The worst part was during the naming ceremony. The nurse got confused as they both looked the same, and unfortunately, their names too got exchanged. He got the name of his brother, and his brother got the word which was for him.

This Fatal likeness even dogged
My footsteps, when at school,
And I was always getting flogged,
For John turned out a fool.
I put this Question, fruitlessly,
To everyone I knew,
‘What would you do if you were me,
To prove that you were you?’

The poet says that the same problem chased them in school too. Once, he was punished for the mischief of his brother. From then, the speaker got so annoyed that he went on asking everyone how can he prove his identity.

Our close resemblance turned the tide
Of my domestic life,
For somehow, my intended bride
Became my brother’s wife.
In fact, year after year the same
Absurd mistakes went on,
And when I died, the neighbours came
And buried John.

The poet says that a similar look may also cause an issue during marriage when his wife would marry his brother out of confusion. The entire life, he faced the same problem. Even after death, people would have disorder who died, whom to burry. They would like mistakenly burry the other one.

Literary Devices

•Alliteration:– the occurrence of the same letter or sound at the beginning of adjacent or closely connected words.

Form and the feature
What would

•Hyperbole:- exaggerated statements or claims not meant to be taken literally. It reached a fearful preach.

•Pun: -a joke exploiting the different possible meanings of a word or the fact that there are words that sound alike but have different meanings.

I grew so like my brother.

•Irony:– The speaker or the port shows how the confusion is created with his twins for the entire life. The confusion between two identical twins.

The Theme of the Poem

The theme of the poem “The Twins” is the physical appearance shared by identical twins: the problem or issue or the confusion created amongst other people. The problem is faced by all to identify the one because of their similar look.

The poet says how he faced problems throughout his life. Once, he got punished because of his brother’s foolishness. He was tensed about what would happen if anyone is dead, who will the people burry. He was also drawn and said that if his wife would marry his brother out of confusion.

He emphasizes and asks everyone how can he prove his identity to others. He was annoyed.

Questions And Answers

Who wrote the twins poem?

Born in Lancashire, England to a bank cashier and an heiress, poet Robert William Service moved to Scotland at the age of five, living with his grandfather and three aunts until his parents moved to Glasgow four years later and the family reunited.

What puzzled the kith and kin?

Kith and Kin were puzzled by the brother’s similarity.

What puzzled the kith and kin of the twins?

In form and feature, face and limb, I grew so like my brother, That folks got taking me for him, And each for one another. It puzzled all our kith and kin, It reach’d an awful pitch; For one of us was born a twin, Yet not a soul knew which.

My Own True Family Poem Questions And Answers Class 10 English West Bengal Board

My Own True Family Poem Questions And Answers Class 10 English West Bengal Board

In this, you are going to go through My Own True Family Poem Questions And Answers Class 10 English West Bengal Board. Understanding a text meticulously in its totality is very important for a learner for scoring better in the West Bengal Board exam. Experts made ample to ensure a thorough critical and line-by-line analysis. Let us find My Own True Family Poem Questions And Answers Class 10 English West Bengal Board.

My Own True Family Poem Questions And Answers

1. Choose the correct alternative to complete the following sentences :

a) Creeping in an oakwood, the poet was looking for a

i) goat

ii) rhinoceros

iii) stag

iv) buffalo

Answer:iii

b) whenever an Oak tree is felled, the number of trees the poet must plant is

i) two

ii) three

iii) four

iv) five

Answer:i

c) When the poet came out of the Oakwood, his heart was that of a

i) stag

ii) tree

iii) human child

iv) old women

Answer:ii

2. State whether the following sentences are true or false. Provide sentences/phrases/words in support of your answer :

a)The old woman held the poet’s secrets in her little bag

–true

Supporting statement – “I have your secret in my little bag”

b) The tree tribe said that the poet is bothered to see the chopping down of oak trees.

–false

Supporting statement :”we are chopped down,we are torn up, you do not blink an eye”.

c) The poet never came out of the oakwood.

–false

Supporting statement : “When I came out of the oakwood, back to human company “.

3. Answer the following questions :

a)When did the poet come twice awake?

-The poet came twice awake when the old woman whom he met in the oakwood opened the bag to show a magic.

b) What would happen to the poet if he failed to make the promise?

-The black oak tree would wrinkle over him and rooted him among the oak trees if the poet failed to make the promise and this way he would die.

c) What was it that altered the poet?

-The poet was altered by the dream about the ill fate of oak trees. He felt compassionate when he was awoke from his dream.

4. Change the following into indirect speech:

a)Rahul asked Dipa, ‘Will you go to school today? ‘

— Rahul asked Dipa that if she could go to school today.

b) Rita said to Ayesha,”Please give me a glass of water”

–Rita requested Ayesha for a glass of water.

c) The old man told the little girl, “May you be happy! “

–The old man prayed for the little girl to be happy.

5. Do as directed

a.Ranjan said,”who does not know the name of Rabindranath?”(change into an affirmative sentence)

–Ranjan told that everybody knows the name of Rabindranath.

b. Sangeeta runs faster than any other girl in her class.(Rewrite using the positive degree of faster)

-No other girl in the class can run as fast as Sangeeta.

c. Kaushiki blamed her friend for the trouble. (rewrite using the noun form of blamed)

-Kaushiki blames her friend for the trouble.

7. Letter Writing

Your school is going to organize the Inter-school District Sports Competition. Suppose you are the secretary of the Sports Club of your school. Write a notice (within 100 words) calling students to participate in the competition. Mention the time, date and venue of the competition. Your notice should be countersigned by the Headmaster/Headmistress of your school.

XYZ High School

Notice

11.09.20

This is to inform all of you as a secretary of the sports club that our school is going to organize a inter-school district sports competition on 1st to 7th of October this year. The competition will be arranged on our school premises. Many events will be there for everyone which will be announced later on by our sports teacher. It’s a request to all of you to take part in this competition and make our school feel proud. For further details contact with the games teacher.

Secretary

Countersigned by –

Sports club,

Headmistress.

Questions And Answers

What is the poem my own true family about?

“My Own True Family” tells the story of a young boy who is cursed by an old woman and dreams he is tied to a stake, surrounded by a ring of talking oak trees. … The boy emerges from this experience with “the walk of a human child, but [his] heart was a tree.”

Who wrote my own true family poem?

Ted Hughes, a famous English poet, wrote the poem.

What did the narrator realize in his dream my own true family?

Nnarrator dreams that his is then surrounded by a staring tribe of oak spirits who make him promise under the threat of death ,that when he sees an oak tree chooped down he will always plant two in its place.

Why were the oak trees angry with the poet?

If the poet failed to make the promise, the black oak tree would wrinkle over him and rooted him among the oak trees.

How did the oak trees threaten the poet?

The tribes were nothing but the oak trees and they said to the poet that they are his own true family. They expressed their unhappiness saying that human being chopped them down,they torn them up. They threatened the poet that they would kill him unless he made a promise to stop this.

What did the oak Tree complain?

The complaints of the Oak-trees were that though they were true family members of mankind, the human beings chop them down, torn them up indiscriminately.

Why does the poet twice awake in the poem my own true family?

The poet in “Our Own True Family” by Ted Hughes went to search for a stag in an oakwood. There he met a weak old lady who was “all knobbly stick and rag” with a little bag. She put spell on the poet by opening the bag and magically putting him to sleep. He started dreaming and thus came twice awake.

What did the old woman tell the child in the poem my own true family?

She said that he had my secret there in her little bag. They said , “We are the oak – trees and your own true family.”

Analysis Of We Are The Music Makers ISC Class 11, 12 English Literature

Analysis Of We Are The Music Makers ISC Class 11, 12 English Literature

English is a difficult subject for many people to learn. Some students may become frustrated and give up, but here’s an Analysis Of We Are The Music Makers ISC Class 11, 12 English Literature to help you maintain your momentum! This Analysis Of We Are The Music Makers will provide all necessary information needed in order to study ISC Class 11, 12 English successfully at home or school; it includes detailed grammar rules with examples that were used during today’s class discussion on the ISC English literature exam.

The Analysis Of We Are The Music Makers in English Chapter 1, ISC English literature class 11, 12 makes it easier to understand the story. Understanding every detail of a story is important for scoring higher on an exam and expert writers have made sure that you know how everything flows together by summarizing perfectly!

Analysis Of We Are The Music Makers

About the Poet

Arthur William Edgar O’Shaughnessy was a British poet of Irish descent who was born in London on March 14, 1844. He spent the outer portion of his minimal life of 36 years, from the age of seventeen, in the service of the library as a transcribed in the Natural History Department of the British Museum. A couple of years later, at the age of nineteen, he became a herpetologist( someone who specializes in the concise study of amphibians and reptiles).

However, his love for literature supplanted everything. His inner life is expressed in four volumes of verse- the ‘Epic of Women’(1870), ‘Lays of France’(1872), ‘Music and moonlight(1874) and ‘Songs of a Worker’ (published posthumously in 1881).

Arthur was associated with Dante Gabriel Rossetti and especially Charles Swinburne of Pre-Raphaelites. In a small comic limerick, which was posthumously published by Michael Rossetti, D. G Rossetti describes his friend O’Shaughnessy as:

“There’s the Irishman
Arthur O’Shaughnessy

On the chessboard of
poets as pawn is here:

Though bishop Or king
Would be rather the
thing.”

According to anthologist Francis Turner Palgrave, Arthur had “a haunting music all his own “ “We are the Music Makers” got published in 1873 under the famous title ‘Ode’. This poem portrays a universal appeal towards the contribution of the artists, musicians, writers, and others to the society. Finally, Edward Elgar quotes ‘ The mainspring of O’Shaughnessy’s Ode is the sense of progress, of never-ceasing change; it is the duty of the artist to see that this inevitable change is progress.”

About the Poem

The Ode, famously known by its very first line “
We are the Music Makers” is the first poem in the collection of O’Shaughnessy’s ‘Music and Moonlight’(1874). The line has been reflected in many different media:

a) Spoken by Willy Wonka in ‘Charlie and The Chocolate Factory’.
b) Used in the Aphex Twin song, “We are the Music Makers” from the album Selected Ambient Works. The motif of O’Shaughnessy’s poem is the notion that the poets- the music makers and dreamers-are the true makers of history and of human civilization. Their dreams and their visions are the foreshadowings of what the rest of mankind arepredestined to work out in tireless conflict: to-day is the realisation of a dream of generations of past; to-morrow will bring forth the dream of today. This gives an indication of “The Good Morrow” of John Donne.

Structure of the poem

We are the music makers,

And we are the dreamers of dreams,

Wandering by lone sea-breakers,

And sitting by desolate streams;

World-losers and world-forsakers,

On whom the pale moon gleams:

Yet we are the movers and shakers

Of the world for ever, it seems.

With wonderful deathless ditties

We build up the world’s great cities,

And out of a fabulous story

We fashion an empire’s glory:

One man with a dream, at pleasure,

Shall go forth and conquer a crown;

And three with a new song’s measure

Can trample a kingdom down.

We, in the ages lying,

In the buried past of the earth,

Built Nineveh with our sighing,

And Babel itself in our mirth;

And o’erthrew them with prophesying

To the old of the new world’s worth;

For each age is a dream that is dying,

Or one that is coming to birth.

A breath of our inspiration

Is the life of each generation;

A wondrous thing of our dreaming

Unearthly, impossible seeming —

The soldier, the king, and the peasant

Are working together in one,

Till our dream shall become their present,

And their work in the world be done.

They had no vision amazing

Of the goodly house they are raising;

They had no divine foreshowing

Of the land to which they are going:

But on one man’s soul it hath broken,

A light that doth not depart;

And his look, or a word he hath spoken,

Wrought flame in another man’s heart.

The poem ‘We Are the Music Makers’ is an Ode. An ode is a serious and dignified composition. It is exalted in subject-matter and elevated in tone and style. The theme and its treatment cannot be trivial or undignified. The poem follows a rhyme scheme that adds to the musical note of the poem. According to anthologist Francis Turner Palgrave, O’Shaughnessy had “a haunting music all his own”. The poem was composed to chords in 1912 by Edward Elgar in his famous work entitled The Music Makers. It follows the rhyme scheme ABABABAB in the first stanza, followed by AABBCDCD in the second and lastly ABABABAB in the final stanza. The various rhyming words in the poem such as makers, breakers, movers, shakers, streams, ditties et al.add a rhythmic tone in the poem. The changing rhythm conveys the change in the tone of the poetic voice.

Poetic persona

Here, in the poem, the speaker should not be identified with the poet. Although it is obvious that the narrative of the poem is in the first person ‘we’- the collective voice of the artists which gives the poem its universal appeal. Thus, the speaker represents all the strata of creative personas- poets, musicians, painters, artists, etc. who are the harbinger of creative rebellion in the otherwise sombre society.

The theme of the poem

The leading theme of the poem is certainly an appreciation of art and bringing out its transformative power through the form of poetry. The poem discusses two things; the importance of arts and the pivotal role that artists play in this world to bring about a blissful change. Their timeless and immortal workpieces not only give positive vibes into society but also help people come out of the unimaginative, dull and monotonous existence. Thus, the poet puts them in the highest pedestal and calls them almost immortal beings. Though art does not cause any physical change, it acts as a goading cause for change. The artists don’t practically get involved in the prevailing social cacophony, their art makes them ‘movers’ and ‘shakers’. They plunge the society on the way of progress and growth in the realm of ideas by shaking it from its stagnation and slumber. The artists remain outside of the predestined societal norms and bring about desirable changes in the world. Shakespeare’s Theseus recognizes the power of the poet’s pen that “gives to airy nothing/A local habitation and a name”. O’Shaughnessy makes it clear in his poem that fantasies of the artist are not mere fantasies. Their fantasies, dreams, myths, and legends inspire civilizations. They are to be seen as revolutionaries:

Yet we are the
movers and shakers

Of the World forever,
it seems

Their world of imagination is conceived to be ‘Infinite and Eternal’ by William Blake, Percy.
Shelley, John Keats, in fact, all the Romantic poets in one way or the other.

In the third stanza, the poet has attributed saintly status to art by referring to biblical cities of Babel and Nineveh which designates them as both creators and destroyers of this human world through their angelic art form. Moreover, he has rejected the concept of Aestheticism, which glorifies the idea that an artist’s only the relationship is to his art itself, referring to the popular 19th-century movement of art for art’s sake and that created the artists as the harbinger of creative rebellions.

Questions And Answers

What is the main theme of the poem we are the music makers?

‘We are the Music Makers’ underlines the idea that art is not for art’s sake, rather it is for life’s sake. Art is a powerful vehicle for social change. It has great transformative power.

Why is We are the music makers an ode?

We Are The Music Makers is an ode to the ones who dream and create. It is a tribute to artists, poets, writers and musicians who shape the world through their art. … It doesn’t limit itself to a particular form of art but includes all the creative and artistic endeavors pursued by humans

Crossing The Bar By Alfred Lord Tennyson Analysis ISC Class 11, 12 English

Crossing The Bar By Alfred Lord Tennyson Analysis ISC Class 11, 12 English

In this, you are going to go through Crossing The Bar By Alfred Lord Tennyson Analysis ISC Class 11, 12 English. Understanding a text meticulously in its totality is very important for a learner for scoring better in the ISC exam. Experts made ample to ensure a thorough critical analysis of Crossing The Bar. Let us find Crossing The Bar By Alfred Lord Tennyson Analysis ISC Class 11, 12 English.

Crossing The Bar By Alfred Lord Tennyson Analysis

About The Poet

Alfred, Lord Tennyson is the most distinguished poet of the Victorian era. He has seemed the embodiment of his genre, both to his contemporaries and to the modern readers. Born at Somerset Rectory in Lincolnshire, England on the 6th of August, 1809, the son of the Reverend George Clayton Tennyson. Tennyson portrayed his literary skills quite early, and by the subtle age of fourteen had authored a drama in blank verse and 6000 lines epic poem.

In 1828, Tennyson got enrolled at the Trinity College, Cambridge. At the same year, he won the Chancellor’ Gold Medal for his poem Timbuctoo. In 1830, he released his first solo collection: Poems, Chiefly Lyrical. His poetry deals with various facets and expresses the spiritual unrest of his date.

Among his best-known poems are The Lady of Shallot, Lockley Hall, Morte d’Athur, and Ulysses. His career hit a high note with In Memoriam.

His voluminous works are known for his experiment with meters was selected to succeed William Wordsworth as England’s new Poet Laureate in 1880. Wordsworth penned him as “ the greatest of our living poets”.

He breathed last at Aldworth House, his home in Surrey, on 6th of October 1892, at the age of 83. He was consigned to the grave in the Poet’s Corner at Westminster Abbey, and the copy of Shakespeare’s play Cymbeline was placed along.

About The Poem

Tennyson is surmised to have written the poem while on a voyage, crossing the Solent from Aldworth to visit the Aisle of Wright. Its vivid imagery and Romanization of death resemble Romantic-era literature. The poem was written three years before his demise. “ The words,” he said, “ came in a moment”. The poem has been very important for him as he had instructed that all of his poetry collections should end with “ Crossing the Bar”. Moreover, he had asked his son Hallam to recite this poem in his deathbed.

The poem focusses on the impermanency of life and the finality of death. The poem was published in the volume “Demeter and Other Poems” ( 1889). The poet uses the journey motif to express his views about his journey from life to death and beyond. The sixteen lines extended metaphor of Crossing the Bar embodies travelling placidly and securely from life to death.

The poem was published in the backdrop of the conflict between science and faith. Darwin’s theory of evolution and many other scientific discoveries shook the people’s faith in the scriptures and God himself. Tennyson strongly portrayed the cycle of rebirth and at last coming face to face with the Pilot in the day of judgement.

Structure Of The Poem

Sunset and evening
star, A
And
one clear call for me!B

And may there be no
moaning of the bar, A

When
I put out to sea, B

But
such a tide as moving seems asleep, C

Too
full for sound and foam, D

When that which drew
from out the boundless deep C

Turns
again home.D

Twilight
and evening bell, E
And
after that the dark!F

And may there be no
sadness of farewell, E

When
I embark; F

For
tho’ from out our bourne of Time and Place G

The
flood may bear me far, A

I hope to see my Pilot
face to face G

When
I have crost the bar. A

‘ Crossing the Bar’ is an elegy of four lines and each of them is quatrains. It is narrated in the first persona. It is concerned with the notion of death, though its mood is far from sad or
sorrowful. He has used the classical rhyme scheme of abab. The structure is akin to that of a ballad form. The length of the lines varies according to the intended movement. The poem is interlinked with theme and conceit. It has a rhyme scheme as ABAB CDCD EFEF GAGA. There is a consistency about the third line of the poem that in all the four stanzas they have ten syllables. For example, And/ may/ there/ be/ no/ moa/ ning/ of/ the/bar .

Tennyson has extended one line in each of the first three stanzas into a single iambic pentameter line. The repeated usage of the word “ bar” is substantial as it is the divide between life and the afterlife. The pace slows down in the last line ‘ When I have crost the bar’ and sums up forcefully in an optimistic note ‘ to see” the awaited “ Pilot”.

Literary Devices In The Poem

The poem “ Crossing the Bar” has the following poetic devices:-

1. Metaphor
The poem has used several metaphors to convey the meaning. A metaphor is a direct comparison between two things but a not explicitly cited. Examples of metaphors in the poem are:

· Sunset and evening star, a
metaphor the end of life.

· Pilot,
a metaphorical reference to God.

· Bar,
I.e sandbar, a strong raised area between the harbour and the sea is a metaphor
for boundary between life and death.

2. Imagery

A reference to the various senses of the human
body. There are several imageries in the poem like

Sunset, the evening star and twilight ( visual imagery).

Moaning of the bar( auditory imagery).

3. Alliteration

Examples of alliteration are:

· Sunset and the evening star.

· And one clear call for me!

· When that which drew

· For tho’ from out our bourne

4. Personification

The figure of speech in which an inanimate object or animal is given human-like qualities.

“ And may there be no moaning of the bar”

“ But such a tide as moving seems asleep”.

5. Enjambment

“ I hope to see my Pilot face to face

When I have crost the bar.”

Theme Of The Poem

Death and Acceptance

The theme of death and acceptance is the predominant theme of the poem “ Crossing the Bar”. It focuses on the necessity of life to accept the ups and downs of life with stoicism and honour.

The speaker correlates this the crossing of the bar which divides the element of life and death. The poem is a clear argument toward the acceptance of death and the assurance of God’s solace in eternity.

The poem begins with” one clear call” for the poet to which he resonates. He wants that there should be no moaning after his departure. The “ sunset and evening star” are symbolic of getting old and the “ call” refers to signal for impending cessation. This establishes the idea that God is behind the process of life and death. Approaching death is one of God’s
plan.

There is a certain sense of hope as the speaker wants no mournful departure. That is probably because he doesn’t see death as a true end. Also, when the tides classes at the shore they make a moaning sound. Here, the endorsement of imminent death calmly, without fear is implied. He hopes that when one disentangles oneself from the knot of life, he
may be set to a new destination without much sound. The going out to return to the “ boundless deep” from which all mortals come. He considers death as a trail through ups and downs from this finite world to a world of the afterlife. Where there will be no boundaries like the “ bar” between life and death and no restrictions of “ Time and Place”. The reason for death is not merely the end but a new beginning.

Questions And Answers

What is the message of the poem Crossing the Bar?

“Crossing the Bar” is a poem in which a speaker confronts the reality of imminent death and finds a kind of peace in the thought of dying. Rather than being scared by death, the speaker presents it as a mere transition into another kind of life (specifically, the Christian afterlife)

Is Crossing the Bar a metaphysical poem?

Lord Alfred Tennyson’s Crossing the Bar is a highly charged spiritual discourse on the aftermath of life. It is a philosophic discourse on the subject of death. … The entire poem is deeply suggestive lesson of final journey of life towards death set forth in the metaphoric language of sea voyage.

What is the bar that the poet wants to cross?

The poet wishes to cross the sandbar, the only obstacle before he can set sail into the sea. Beyond him lies a vast sea with an unknown journey but known destination.

What do sunset evening stars mean?

The “sunset and evening star” are symbolic of getting old. As the evening star appears in the sky at the time of sunset when the day ends metaphorically it refers the end of the life of the speaker.

What metaphorical meaning has the moaning of the bar?

In this poem, Tennyson is using a sandbar as a metaphor to represent the line between life and death. Waves must crash against a sandbar in order to reach the shore, which makes a sound that Tennyson calls “the moaning of the bar.”

What does too full for sound and foam mean?

Through the poem, the poet Alfred, Lord Tennyson compares his impending death to crossing a bar. Like a calm sea wave, which is ‘too full for sound and foam’ the speaker hopes that his death will be silent, smooth and quick, making no fuss. When that which drew from out the boundless deep.

What do you mean by crossing the bar has the poet used the journey motif in crossing the bar and to what purpose?

In ‘Crossing the Bar’ Tennyson anticipates his own death and gives vent to his feelings in metaphorical language. Thus, the poet uses the journey motif to express his belief that there is life beyond death. After death one goes on the final journey back to his real home (heaven) from where he once came.

How does Lord Tennyson see death as a homecoming in the poem Crossing the Bar?

The poet sees death as a homecoming, an event as natural, sure, and peaceful as the flowing of a river into the ocean that is its home. On its way to the ocean, a river takes with it the sediment that creates a sandbar (also called a bar).

The Dolphins By Carol Ann Duffy Critical Appreciation ISC Class 11, 12 English

The Dolphins By Carol Ann Duffy Critical Appreciation ISC Class 11, 12 English

In this, you are going to go through The Dolphins By Carol Ann Duffy Critical Appreciation ISC Class 11, 12 English. Understanding a text meticulously in its totality is very important for a learner for scoring better in the ISC exam. Experts made ample to ensure a thorough critical and line-by-line analysis. Let us find The Dolphins By Carol Ann Duffy Critical Appreciation ISC Class 11, 12 English.

The Dolphins By Carol Ann Duffy Critical Appreciation

About The Poet

Carol Ann Duffy is an award-winning Scottish poetess born in Glasgow, Scotland on 23rd December 1955, the first child of May and Frank Duffy. The “post-post-war England” poetess as referred to by Danette DeMarco in Mosaic explored a wide arena of subjects ranging from gender and oppression to raising societal cases and thereby expressing them in familiar, conversational language. She was the first woman to openly speak out on LGBT and also the first poet laureate of England.

Carol grew up attending convent schools and began writing poems from the tender age of 11. Subsequently, she published her first poetry at the age of 14. She later attended Liverpool University and after graduating with a degree in philosophy(1977), she set to achieve her dreams of writing by publishing several books, read and teach poetry. Duffy also served as a poetry critic for The Guardian from 1988 to 1989 and as an editor to the Ambit ( a poetry magazine).

A wide range of works are attributed to her. Several collections include Standing Female Nude (1985), The Other Country (1990), The World’s Wife (1999), and Rapture (2005). During the early 21st century, her books were written for children, including picture books like Underwater Farmyard (2002), The Tear Thief (2007). Dramatic characters mixed with narratives, voicing wittily being social critique, characterize Duffy’s early works.

She is lauded with several awards be it winning the Costa Book Awards twice (1993,2011) or T.S Eliot Prize in 2005.

About The Poem

The poem ‘The Dolphins’ is written in dramatic monologue – from the perspective of dolphins. It covers many themes of oppression, curtailment of freedom, tramping the voice of others. It also broaches ideas which have to do with animal welfare and treatment met out to the animals.

It presents the viewpoint of the trapped dolphin whose life has remained now confined to a mere water pool. The dolphin in agony tells us his happy anecdote of life in the ocean and their experience in the limited space of the water tank. This artificial life of theirs has no music “ We circle well-worn grooves/ of water on a single note”, no sunlight, no moon ( which is reduced to a “coloured ball”). Nothing is natural here and this hollowness makes their future seem bleak “…our mind knows we will die here.”

Form And Structure Of The Poem

World is what you swim in, or dance, it is simple.
We are in our element but we are not free.
Outside this world you cannot breathe for long.
The other has my shape. The other’s movement
forms my thoughts. And also mine. There is a man
and there are hoops. There is a constant flowing guilt.

We have found no truth in these waters,
no explanations tremble on our flesh.
We were blessed and now we are not blessed.
After travelling such space for days we began
to translate. It was the same space. It is
the same space always and above it is the man.
And now we are no longer blessed, for the world
will not deepen to dream in. The other knows
and out of love reflects me for myself.
We see our silver skin flash by like memory
of somewhere else. There is a coloured ball
we have to balance till the man has disappeared.

The moon has disappeared. We circle well-worn grooves
of water on a single note. Music of loss forever
from the other’s heart which turns my own to stone.
There is a plastic toy. There is no hope. We sink
to the limits of this pool until the whistle blows.
There is a man and our mind knows we will die here.

The poem is divided into four stanzas, each having six lines. Although no definite rhyme scheme is followed, there are instances in the text where we find internal rhyme like at the end of line three of 4th stanza, “ own” and “ stone” rhyme. The use of words is simple and the form of is nearly curated. Simplicity juxtaposed with ambiguity makes an impression on the readers.

Message: The poem aims at giving voice to other suffering creatures who are oppressed in the same way or other daily. We are exhorted implicitly to do something against the needless confinement of innocent beings. Protection and conservation of wildlife should be undertaken on a vigorous scale and awareness should be made for the same.

Literary Devices Of The Poem

There are various poetic devices of the poem. They include:

1. Simile

The example of simile is :

· “We see our silver skin flash by like a memory”.

2. Alliteration

It is the close repetition of consonant sounds at the beginning of words. Examples of alliteration in the poem include:

· World is what you swim in

· Will not deepen to dream in.

· Out of love reflects me for myself.

· We circle well-worn grooves.

3. Repetition

The purposeful use of words and phrases, again and again, to put emphasis and create a smooth flow.

Examples of repetition in the poem are:

· “The other has my shape. The other’s movement

….The other knows

And out of love reflects me for myself.”

·After travelling such space for days we began to translate. It was the same space. It is the same space always and above it is the man.”

4. Enjambment

It refers to the continuation of a sentence to the next without a pause. In the poem, the examples of enjambment are:

· “The other has my shape. The other’s movement

Forms my thoughts. And also mine. There is a man

And there are hoops. There is a constant flowing guilt.”

5. Metaphor

Examples of metaphors includes:

· ‘constant flowing guilt’ a metaphor for the water pumped through the tank, or the sensitivity on the part of the dolphins who are aware of abuse.

· ‘ no truth in these waters’.

6. Anaphora

‘The other’, ‘There is’, ‘We were blessed and now we are not blessed.’

Theme

Human greed and oppression meted out to animals is one of the key themes of the poem The Dolphins. Man has been always exploiting animals. Every day we hear about the cruelty imparted on the innocent anima. Such instances are many as Kerala’s bursting of cracker-filled pineapple in a pregnant elephant’s mouth or illegal poaching of feline ( lions, tigers), animal slaughter, chicken being revealed or disturbing the natural migration process of Siberian falcons( also called Amur falcons) in Nagaland to several others.

Such cruelty and human greed is clearly brought out through Carol Ann Duffy’s The Dolphins. The dolphins are confined in an aquarium which lacks the depth and richness of their ocean life. Man for his monetary needs forces them to perform acrobatics like balancing on them a ‘coloured ball’ failing which they are tortured or isolated.

The Dolphins brings the idea that we should never abuse the wildlife and exploit them. The dolphin in the poem, includes all other dolphins in it position, makes it clear that they long for freedom:

“ World is what you swim in, or dance, it is simple.
We are in our own element but we are not free.”

To succinct, The Dolphins pinpoint the psychological effects of isolation and dislocation. The dolphins here gives a voice to the feelings of all isolated and dislocated creatures. The poet wants to make us aware of it, as we know only of human isolation and is dislocation. We need to actively take up these facets and accordingly work for betterment.

Birches Poem Line By Line Explanation ISC Class 11, 12 English Literature

Birches Poem Line By Line Explanation ISC Class 11, 12 English Literature

In this, you are going to go through Birches Poem Line By Line Explanation ISC Class 11, 12 English Literature. Understanding a text meticulously in its totality is very important for a learner for scoring better in the ISC exam. Experts made ample to ensure a thorough critical and line-by-line explanation. Let us find Birches Poem Line By Line Explanation ISC Class 11, 12 English Literature.

Birches Poem Line By Line Explanation

Line (1-5)

When I see birches bend to left and right

Across the lines of straighter darker trees,

I like to think some boy’s been swinging them.

But swinging doesn’t bend them down to stay

As ice storms do. Often you must have seen them

The poem Birches by Robert Frost opens in a simple, easy and colloquial style. The speaker oversees the bend birches and subsequently imagines that some boy has been swinging them, resulting in their bending down in such away. But soon the reality strikes and then the birches can’t be bent down permanently by swinging as they are done by the ice- storms. In other words, it is not the boy but only the ice- storm that can bend birches forever. “ But swinging doesn’t bend them down to stay”. He brings forth the opposite of reality and fancy, which continues in other parts of the poem.

Line (5-13)

As ice-storms do. Often you must have seen them

Loaded with ice a sunny winter morning

After a rain. They click upon themselves

As the breeze rises, and turn many-colored

As the stir cracks and crazes their enamel.

Soon the sun’s warmth makes them shed crystal shells

Shattering and avalanching on the snow-crust—

Such heaps of broken glass to sweep away

You’d think the inner dome of heaven had fallen.

Here the reader is addressed and says that he must have witnessed the birches full of ice on a sunny winter morning after the rain. The blowing of wind makes the birches swing up and down with a clicking sound. The eyes on the birches shine and bring out many colours as the rays of Sun are refracted in passing through it. Soon the warmth of Sun increases and the eyes on the birches is shaken and breaks down like a piece of glass. Here, the breaking of eyes has been compared to shattering crystal and glass that falls like an avalanche. This is the first clue of destruction in the poem.

Line (14-20)

They are dragged to the withered bracken by the load,

And they seem not to break; though once they are bowed

So low for long, they never right themselves:

You may see their trunks arching in the woods

Years afterwards, trailing their leaves on the ground

Like girls on hands and knees that throw their hair

The burden of ice on the birches cause them to bend down very low, almost touching the ground, but they still do not break. It is said that their trunks lie arched in the forest for several years and they keep their leaves trailing on the ground just like girls sitting on their hands and knees, spreading their hair over their heads to dry in the sun.

A beautiful example of a simile is observed in these lines as the poet compares the bending down of the birches to the girls on their knees, spreading their hair over their heads to dry them. This brings out the fragility and the vulnerability of the birches.

Line (21-27)

Before them over their heads to dry in the sun.

But I was going to say when Truth broke in

With all her matter-of-fact about the ice-storm

I should prefer to have some boy bend them

As he went out and in to fetch the cows—

Some boy too far from town to learn baseball,

Whose only play was what he found himself,

Even though the speaker knows about the reality of the bending down of birches but once again we see to his fancy of the birches having bend down only by swinging by some boy. Taking the imagination further, he thinks of the boy, looking after his cows and living far away from the town to learn baseball, who devised a game for himself that is swinging.

The word river is very important here as the poet rejected the narrow limitations of the outside world but still, these must have their limits. Likewise, the boy is separated from other players and has to play alone.

Line (28-35)

Summer or winter, and could play alone.

One by one he subdued his father’s trees

By riding them down over and over again

Until he took the stiffness out of them,

And not one but hung limp, not one was left

For him to conquer. He learned all there was

To learn about not launching out too soon

And so not carrying the tree away

Now we find that the speaker rejects the reason behind the bending of the trees to an ice storm, instead, he denotes it to be the work of the boy, even though he knows the boy’s limitations. The boy “subdues” his father’s trees “ riding them” until he takes away their “ stiffness”. This makes him victorious over the trees: “ not one was left for him to conquer.” This closer analysis of the boy’s skill suggests that the speaker himself has been a swinger of the birches in his boyhood.

Line (35-40)

And so not carrying the tree away

Clear to the ground. He always kept his poise

To the top branches, climbing carefully

With the same pains you use to fill a cup

Up to the brim, and even above the brim.

Then he flung outward, feet first, with a swish,

These lines are composed of a description of the boy’s technique for climbing and bending the birches. His climbing of the tree is compared to the metaphorical filling of the cup to the brim or even above the brim. “Ge always kept his poise… carefully” indicates the same care taken up by the poet in the construction of the poem.

Line (41-47)

Kicking his way down through the air to the ground.

So was I once myself a swinger of birches.

And so I dream of going back to be.

It’s when I’m weary of considerations,

And life is too much like a pathless wood

Where your face burns and tickles with the cobwebs

Broken across it, and one eye is weeping

In a pleasant, the speaker recalls his boyhood days when he was “swinger of birches”. When life becomes full of chaos, thoughtless, lifeless, full of confusion and uncertainties, he would wish to escape from this world and transcend to the next world of imagination.

Line (48-53)

From a twig’s having lashed across it open.

I’d like to get away from earth awhile

And then come back to it and begin over.

May no fate willfully misunderstand me

And half grant what I wish and snatch me away

Not to return. Earth’s the right place for love:

These lines reflect the crux of the poem where the poet makes his thematic statement. He says that he would like to go up as an escape from tensions and worries, but only for a while that is temporary:

“ I’d like to get away from earth awhile
And then come back and begin over.”

The message of the poem is clear: balance your earthly duties with your spiritual aspirations.

Line (54-59)

I don’t know where it’s likely to go better.

I’d like to go by climbing a birch tree,

And climb black branches up a snow-white trunk

Toward heaven, till the tree could bear no more,

But dipped its top and set me down again.

That would be good both going and coming back.

One could do worse than be a swinger of birches.
The speaker climbs up the tree to reach “ heaven”. It suggests we to grab an opportunity to “ get away from the earth” for a while but again come back to real-world as stated by the tree remaining grounded. “That would be good both going and coming back”. Limits lay the existence of real-world and that the leap of imagination must also check to the conditions of certainty.

Critical Analysis Of Desiderata Poem ISC Class 11, 12 English Poem

Critical Analysis Of Desiderata Poem ISC Class 11, 12 English Poem

In this, you are going to go through Critical Analysis Of Desiderata Poem ISC Class 11, 12 English Poem. Understanding a text meticulously in its totality is very important for a learner for scoring better in the ISC exam. Experts made ample to ensure a thorough critical and line-by-line analysis. Let us find Critical Analysis Of Desiderata Poem ISC Class 11, 12 English Poem.

Critical Analysis Of Desiderata Poem ISC

About The Poet

Max Ehrmann (September 26, 1872- September 9, 1945) was a recognized poet, attorney born in Terre Haute, Indiana to German parents. In 1894, he graduated from De Pauw University, Greencastle. Later, he went on to study philosophy at Harvard University.

After practising as a lawyer for several years, he attempted his family business. Within a span of 10 years, he devoted all his time in literary works.

He in his lifetime has contributed great thoughts to our literary lexicons, giving birth to a new gamut of words and wisdom of his own provided with worthy observations.

His works majorly concerned with social issues, philosophical search for social truth, peace, spiritualism and various other trails of life. Poems such as Complacent Women, 1918, and Washington, D.C, 1924 as such as that they are relevant even today. Two of his most prominent poems are– Desiderata (1927) and A Prayer (1906). Other works comprise – A Farrago (1898), Scarlet Women etc. Max Ehrmann’s legacy is lauded with several accolades ranging from Doctor of Letters from D P University in 1937 to his life-sized bronze statue by sculptor Bill Wolfe in 2010.

He died at the age of 73 and is buried in Highland Lawn Cemetery in Terre Haute.

About the poem

Desiderata ( Latin: Desired things) is a didactic prose poem written in 1927. It offers a simple positive credo of life encapsulating wisdom, positivity and some timeless truths. The poem by its name focuses on the things we should desire or aim at.

The poem’s grace lies in its power to help one realize and rise above uncomfortable facts about human presence. The nuanced approach of the poem towards life is commendable. It encourages one to celebrate goodness. Note of positivity in the poem gives rise to its rhythmic sequence. Brushing through the themes of love, compassion, dignity, honestly towards life, it retains the power of optimism with wise ratings and gentle guidance.

Through the poem, Ehrmann has advised us to find hope in this world full of treachery, chaos, fraud, hypocrisy and loneliness and inspire people to change their perception. It opens with the most relevant message in our time of troubles :

“ Go placidly amid the noise and the haste,
and remember what
peace there may be in silence.

As far as possible,
without surrender,
be on good terms with
all persons.”

The poem’s wisdom can be correlated to Rudyard Kipling’s famous poem ‘ If–’. Ehrmann said about Desiderata “ because it counsels those virtues I felt myself most in need of”.

Structure Of The Poem

Go placidly amid
the noise and haste,
and remember what peace there may be in
silence.

As far as possible without surrender
be on good terms with all persons.
Speak your truth quietly and clearly;
and listen to others,
even the dull and the ignorant;
they too have their story.

Avoid loud and
aggressive persons,
they are vexations to the spirit.
If you compare yourself with others,
you may become vain and bitter;
for always there will be greater and lesser
persons than yourself.

Enjoy your achievements as well as your plans.
Keep interested in
your own career, however humble;
it is a real possession in the changing
fortunes of time.

Exercise caution in your business affairs;
for the world is full of trickery.
But let this not blind you to what virtue
there is;
many persons strive for high ideals;
and everywhere life is full of heroism.
Be yourself.

Especially, do not feign affection.
Neither be cynical about love;
for in the face of all aridity and
disenchantment
it is as perennial as the grass.

Take kindly the
counsel of the years,
gracefully surrendering the things of youth.
Nurture strength of spirit to shield you in
sudden misfortune.

But do not distress yourself with dark
imaginings.
Many fears are born of fatigue and loneliness.
Beyond a wholesome discipline,
be gentle with yourself.

You are a child of the
universe,
no less than the trees and the stars;
you have a right to be here.

And whether or not it is clear to you,
no doubt the universe is unfolding as it
should.

Therefore be at peace
with God,
whatever you conceive Him to be,
and whatever your labors and aspirations,
in the noisy confusion of life keep peace with
your soul.

With all its sham,
drudgery, and broken dreams,
it is still a beautiful world.
Be cheerful.

The philosophical poem is split up into eight unequal stanzas of varying length. The undue embellishment in tone and rhythm is absent. It does not fulfil a definite metrical pattern and it moreover reads like a sentence with occasional breaks to structure it as a poem. It has verbs and adverbs with adds to the instructional element of the poem. The poem is full of suggestions to deal with and avoid distressing situations and values the views of others, be it ‘ dull’ or ‘ignorant’.

Is it a poem in true sense? :

Historically it is regarded as a didactic poem but a modern critic is sure to challenge the categorization of Desiderata. It seems to be a more compendium of maxims clubbed together in a poetic form. No significant figure if speech. Through its inspirational nature seek the qualities of a poem. Moreover, the adverbs used at the beginning placidly, quickly and clearly provides a kind of rhyme and repetition heightening its calmness.

Literary Devices In The Poem

There are several figures of speech that we come across in the poem. These includes:

1. Simile

The figure of speech in which a likeness between two different things is stated explicitly.

Examples in the poem include:

‘ it is perennial as the grass’.

“ Neither be cynical about love;

for in the face of all aridity and disenchantment,

it is as perennial as the grass.”

2. Alliteration

– The figure of speech includes the close repetition of consonant sounds, usually at the beginning of the words.

If you compare yourself with others.’

Especially do not feign affecting’.

Nurture strength of the spirit to
shield you in sudden misfortune.’

‘But do not distress yourself with
dark imaginings.’

·
‘Many fears are born of fatigue
and loneliness.’

3. Metonymy

Substitution of the name of one of the attributes of a thing for the name of the thing itself. Examples of metonymy in the poem: Take kindly the counsel of the years.

Theme Of The Poem

Positive outlook towards one’s life– Positivity/ Optimism is the pivotal theme of the poem Desiderata by Max Ehrmann. The poet inspires us to be calm and hopeful in any dire situation. In a simple yet powerful manner, it lays out the pillars for living a happy life and keeping peace in oneself. Abraham Lincoln has rightly said, “ most people are about as happy as they make up their minds to be”. It advises us to remain focused on ourselves and not just sit in judgement over others and the world around us. Ehrmann has given practical suggestions for inner peace by way of maintaining the friendship, being truthful and honest and even respect and listen to the ‘dull’ and ‘ignorant’. He suggested:

“ If you compare
yourself with others,

you may become vain
or bitter,

for always there be greater
or lesser persons than yourself.

Enjoy your
achievements as well as your plans.”

However, the poet is not unaware of the malicious world. There are those who are cynical about love and others who are disenchanted with everything under the sun along with ‘ loud and aggressive persons. Whatever be the chaos yet his poem brings out the themes of love, compassion, hope, optimism that will help us to cross this drowning boat of mankind.
“ And whatever your
labours and aspirations, in the noisy
confusion of life, keep peace in your soul”.

Extra Questions And Answers For Feelings By C.J Heck ICSE Class 8 English

Extra Questions And Answers For Feelings By C.J Heck ICSE Class 8 English

In this, you are going to go through Extra Questions And Answers For Feelings By C.J Heck ICSE Class 8 English. Understanding a text meticulously in its totality is very important for a learner for scoring better in the ICSE board exam. Experts made ample to ensure a thorough explanation of extra questions and answers of Feelings. Let us find Extra Questions And Answers For Feelings By C.J Heck ICSE Class 8 English.

Extra Questions And Answers For Feelings By C.J Heck

1.Who is asking the questions in the poem?

Ans: The child is asking the questions to the mother in the poem.

2.What kind of things do the children in the poem say?

A) pleasing

B) kind

C) unpleasant.

Choose the correct option.

Ans: C) Unpleasant.

3.Why do the things said by the children hurt the speaker?

Ans: The things that the children say, hurt the speaker because they are not true.

4.Match the stanzas to the key points.

Stanza 1 Questioning the behaviour of bullies

Stanza 2 Explaining why they are bullying

Stanza 3 Trying to deal with bullies

Stanza 4 Advising to avoid anger

5.‘They don’t know how to fix that.’ What does ‘that’ refer to?

Ans: ‘That’ refers to the feelings of unhappiness and anger that the bullies hide within themselves.

6.What does the mother tell the child about happiness in stanza 3?

Ans: The mother says that anger grows faster and easily than anger does. Thus, one should be happy and not keep on piling anger within oneself.

7.What are some of the consequences of letting anger grow bigger each day?

Ans: The consequences of letting anger grow bigger each day can be very harmful for oneself. It is a waste of life, and too much piled up anger can lead to unhappiness.

8.What advice does the mother give in the last stanza?

Ans: In the last stanza, the mother has asked the child to stand up for his feelings. She has also asked the child to do it in a nice and polite way and not be angry or mad at anybody. According to her, anger can ruin things.

9.Do you think the child is talking about a real situation or an imaginary one? Give reasons for your answer.

Ans: The child seems to be talking about a real incident that has happened to him. He might have faced similar situations somewhere and thus; he was complaining about those to his mother.

10.If you were in the child’s place, would you follow the mother’s advice? Give reasons for your response.

Ans: I would follow the mother’s advice, had I been in her place. That’s because a mother is the most trustworthy person in one’s life and of course someone who has seen the world more than the child. So, it can be expected out of her that she would give good advice.

11.Do you think the mother understands the child’s problem? Justify your response.

Ans: The mother understands the child’s problem, because there are high chances that she has gone through the same things at least once in her life.

12.Read the following hyperboles and say what they exaggerate- feeling, time or reaction.

A) I’ll be back in a second. – Time.

B) Don’t take her notes or she’ll kill you. – Reaction.

C) I was so frightened; my heart was in my mouth. – Feeling.

Extra Questions And Answers

1.What kind of things do the children in the poem say?

Ans: The children in the poem say things that is hurtful to the child in the poem. These things hurt more because they are untrue.

2.What is the reason that bullies pick on the smaller kids?

Ans: Bullies pick on other weaker and smaller kids mostly because they have lots of anger and unhappiness piled up within themselves, and they don’t know how to channelise it.

3.Why is being nice not always easy?

Ans: Being nice is not always easy, because sometimes one gets way to instigate to control oneself and suppress the anger within. And also, sometimes it is difficult to be nice to those people, knowing that they would say hurtful things.

Nine Gold Medals By David Roth Summary ICSE Class 9, 10 English

Nine Gold Medals By David Roth Summary ICSE Class 9, 10 English

English is a difficult subject for many people to learn. Some students may become frustrated and give up, but here’s Nine Gold Medals By David Roth Summary ICSE Class 9, 10 English to help you maintain your momentum! This Nine Gold Medals By David Roth Summary will provide all necessary information needed in order to study ICSE Class 9, 10, English successfully at home or school; it includes detailed grammar rules with examples that were used during today’s class discussion on the ICSE Board English Exam.

The Nine Gold Medals By David Roth Summary in English, ICSE Class 9, 10, English makes it easier to understand the story. Understanding every detail of a story is important for scoring higher on an exam and expert writers have made sure that you know how everything flows together by summarizing perfectly!

Nine Gold Medals By David Roth Summary

About The Poet

Roth was a celebrated American rock vocalist, songwriter, actor, musician, author and former radio personal widely known for his wild, robust stage persona, and as the lead singer of the hard rock band Van Halen. Born to a Jewish family on 10 October 1954 in Bloomington, Indiana, United States. His father Nathan Lee was an ophthalmologist and his mother Sibyl Roth was a teacher. Lisa Roth, the producer of the Rockabye Baby lullaby music series is his sister. He did his early schooling at The Webb Schools in Claremont, California followed by John Muir High School in Pasadena. Later, he attended Pasadena City College where he met the Van Halen brothers, Eddie and Alex.
David sang solo in their late teens apart from singing with a group called the Red Ball Jets. He strikes many chords, tastes, souls with his distinct songs, off best observations and potent singing and subject matter. He has a vocal range of five octaves and three notes. He has amassed top honours at premier songwriter competitions – Kerrville (TX) and Falcon Ridge (NY). His songs: Rising in Love, Manuel Garcia, May the light of love, Nine Gold Medals and Earth have found their door to Carnegie Hall, United States. He has served many genres, are Hard Rock, Heavy Metal, Glam Metal and Pop Rock. He is known as a prosperous solo artist releasing multiple RIAA– certified Gold and Platinum albums.

About the Poem

Nine Gold Medals by David Roth gives us a glimpse of the Special Olympics ( a sporting event in which differently-abled sportspersons participate). It motivates us in nurturing feelings of human compassion, empathy, sympathy, brotherhood, sportsmanship and cooperation. This poem speaks of various athletes( both men and women) who have come from all over the country to participate in this ‘ Special Olympics’. They have come to partake for bronze, silver and gold metals for which they have toiled hard for years. Nine Gold Medals brings out the near about scene of a race and reminds us of our own experiences. In the poem, nine differently-abled athletes join in the prestigious Special Olympics and how at last an unprecedented unforeseen event preceded when each wins a gold medal in the same event. During the course of the last ‘ hundred–yard dash’, a young runner tumbles down on the track and being unable to get up, cries of his frustration seeing his labour go in vain. Others, hearing his scream returned back to help the injured contestant stand on his own and complete the race hand in hand. For their show of compassion, each was conferred gold medals.

However, many accounted that the event is based on a true anecdote but somewhat partly. According to the multitude at the Special Olympics Washington Office, the incident took place at a 1976 track and field game held in Spokane, Washington. But it was only a few partakers who actually turned to lay a helping hand and finish the race. The others continued their race. This has provided a great message to mankind and urged us that this world no more needs the rat race but more cooperation and collaboration. Ultimately this poem gives emphasis to the notion of care and empathy rather than winning the burden of competition.

Structure Of The Poem

The athletes had come from all over the country
To run for the gold, for the silver and bronze
Many weeks and months of training
All coming down to these games.

The spectators gathered around the old field
To cheer on all the young women and men
The final event of the day was approaching
Excitement grew high to begin.

The blocks were all lined up for those who would use them
The hundred-yard dash and the race to be run
These were nine resolved athletes in back of the starting line
Poised for the sound of the gun.

The signal was given, the pistol exploded
And so did the runners all charging ahead
But the smallest among them, he stumbled and staggered
And fell to the asphalt instead.

He gave out a cry in frustration and anguish
His dreams and his efforts all dashed in the dirt
But as sure as I’m standing here telling this story
The same goes for what next occurred.

The eight other runners pulled up on their heels
The ones who had trained for so long to compete
One by one they all turned around and went back to help him
And brought the young boy to his feet.

Then all the nine runners joined hands and continued
The hundred-yard dash now reduced to a walk
And a banner above that said (Special Olympics)
Could not have been more on the mark.

That’s how the race ended, with nine gold medals
They came to the finish line holding hands still
And a standing ovation and nine beaming faces
Said more than these words ever will.

The poem does not follow a definite rhyme scheme. For instance, the rhyme scheme of the first stanza is ABCD. Nine Gold Medals is written in the form of a song where we find eight stanzas having four lines each. It describes a series of events followed by a climax at the end. Described much like a story of nine athletes from all over the country. The language is very simple and lucid. Here, Roth takes the part of a narrator as well as an onlooker as he mentions “But as sure as I’m standing here telling the story/ Now it’s a strange one, but here’s what occurred.”Although the poem incorporates no specific rhyme scheme it is full of rhythm and its beauty can be relished by singing. Let us take the following lines as an example:

· ‘ And a banner above that said (Special Olympics)
Could not have been more on the mark.’
· ‘And a standing ovation and nine beaming faces Said
more than these words ever will.’

Literary Devices In The Poem

There are majorly two poetic
devices used in the poem. The use of alliteration and climax add a lucidity and
rhythm to the poem. They are as follows:-

1. Alliteration

It is the close repetition of continent sounds usually at the beginning
of words. Categories of alliteration assimilated in the poem includes:
·
“His dreams
and his efforts dashed
in the dirt.”
·
“ But the youngest among them
stumbled and staggered.”

2. Climax

The text leading up to an event, phrase, mood or feeling of importance,
in prose or poetry. In this text, the climax is achieved when the empathy of
the eight athletes wins each of them a gold medal by helping their fellow partaker.

Theme Of The Poem

The Theme of Brotherhood

The idea of brotherhood is the central theme which the poem ‘ Nine Gold Medals’ wants to convey. The poem proceeds in the form of an anecdote describing an event of the Special Olympics( organised for differently-abled People). Through a series of unprecedented and unforeseen events, the poet has narrated the human feelings of compassion, brotherhood, togetherness, empathy, sympathy and companionship. The poet has specifically used ‘ Special Olympics’ for sending the special message of universal brotherhood to the world.
In the poem, the nine athletes have gathered from all over the country to participate in the prestigious tournament and make their years of constant, effort fruitful. Both men and women have participated together providing a platform for equality. As the poem proceeds, a young competitor fells down suddenly. The injured athlete, unable to stand screams out his frustration seeing his hard-earned efforts going n vain. Upon hearing his howl, other partakers run towards him leaving their race. What follows next is striking. They all ( including the injured athlete) completed the race of ‘ hundred- yard dash’ hand in hand. At last, everyone, owing to their empathy, was bestowed with gold medals. The poem has successfully reflected the idea of brotherhood. We now realise that cooperation and companionship are what we need in this.

Questions And Answers

Is the Nine Gold Medals real?

The poem ‘Nine Gold Medals’ is based on a story about the nine differently-abled athletes in a Special Olympic event. Though it is perceived to be ‘a true story’, an online report claims it to be partly true.

What is the significance of the poem Nine Gold Medals?

This poem teaches us how encouraging a disappointed person may result in a win for everyone. Human compassion made the athletes forget the competition they had with each other. They picked up their weak companion and finished the race with him. Thus, they all ended up winning one gold medal each.

What event started 9 gold medals?

According to the folks at the Special Olympics Washington office, the incident happened at a 1976 track-and-field event held in Spokane, Washington.

What was the final event in Nine Gold Medals?

The hundred-yard race which was the final race of the Special Olympics is also the most prestigious event (100-m dash) at the Olympic Games, because the athlete who wins it is recognised all over the world. Nine differently-abled athletes were competing for this event.

How does the poet convey the intense moment Nine Gold Medals?

The poem presents the situation of a race, where the contestants leave aside their desire to win the medal to help a smaller and weaker contestant. They all go hand-in-hand to the finishing line.

What stopped the race after it had taken off in the poem Nine Gold Medals?

The race ended with the nine runners in the Special Olympics event holding hands and walking to the finishing line together. The race which was supposed to be a competition was reduced to a mere walk in the end delivering a message of collaboration and cooperation.

Where is the poem Nine Gold Medals set?

David Roth’s poem “Nine Gold Medals” is set in the backdrop of a true incident in the Special Olympics held in Spokane, Washington in 1976. It was a track-and-field event where there were nine participants. One of the athletes fell down to the ground during the race.

The Gift Of India By Sarojini Naidu Poem Summary ISC Class 11, 12 English

The Gift Of India By Sarojini Naidu Poem Summary ISC Class 11, 12 English

In this, you are going to go through The Gift Of India By Sarojini Naidu Poem Summary ISC Class 11, 12 English. Understanding a text meticulously in its totality is very important for a learner for scoring better in the ISC exam. Experts made ample to ensure a thorough explanation of The Gift Of India Summary. Let us find The Gift Of India By Sarojini Naidu Poem Summary ISC Class 11, 12 English.

The Gift Of India By Sarojini Naidu Poem Summary

About The Poet

Sarojini Naidu was a renowned, poignant, prolific writer of Indian history who by her literary and patriotic works earned the sobriquet ‘ The Nightingale of India’. Born on February 13, 1879, in Hyderabad, India; Sarojini Naidu was a political activist, feminist, and the first Indian woman to be the president of the Indian National Congress followed by Anne Besant. Apart from these accolades, she has various firsts under her hat. She was the first child of Aghorenath Chattopadhyay, who was the then principal of the Nizam’s College, Hyderabad and her mother Barada Sundari Devi.

She attended the University of Madras at 12 and studied from 1895-98 at King’s College, London and later at Girton College, Cambridge. She has always been a bright student and topped the Madras University matriculation examinations.

Various works of poetry are attributed to him: The Golden Threshold (1905), The Bird of Time (1912), Death and the Spring, Muhammad Jinnah: An Ambassador of Unity etc. and her collected poems were published as ‘ The Sceptered Flute’(1928) and ‘ The Feather of Dawn’ (1961).

She was a freedom fighter, who was drawn towards the INC and to Mahatma Gandhi’s Noncooperation Movement. Her anti-British activities landed her on prison sentences in 1930,1932, 1942-43. She accompanied Gandhiji in the Second Round Table Conference in 1931. In 1929, Sarojini presided over the East African Indian Congress in South Africa and was awarded the Kaisar -e-Hind medal by the British for the same. She became the governor of the United Provinces( presently Uttar Pradesh).

Sarojini Naidu’s life has always been an inspiration for not only the Indians but also for the World. It is solely motivating how a small girl of South rose to prominence in the Indian national movements and became the known name to every Indian household.

Sarojini Naidu left the Indian soil for her eternity on March 2, 1949, Lucknow.

About The Poem

The Gift of India by Sarojini Naidu was composed in the year 1915. It gives wholehearted tribute to the contributions of our martyred Indian soldiers in World War I. Over 1.5 million troops of Indians served the interest of their colonial masters in WWI of whom 62,000 died and another 67,000 were wounded badly. They served at various locations of strategic importance to the Allied forces.

The poem concerns effectively the themes of patriotism, no glory in warfare, soldiers’s unpriced sacrifice for someone else’s war, but also talks about the innumerable gifts as benefits offered to the Britishers over centuries.
The Gift of India is included in the volume of poems ‘The broken wings’. The poem is emotionally and sentimentally surged up with dominant feelings of respect, pathos and pride at the bravery, loss and pain of a number of lives lost of the deadly battlefield.

Towards the end of the poem, the poet hopes that soon good sense would prevail, and there would be peace in the world” And life be refashioned on the anvils of peace,”. Those sacrifices of the Indians would be remembered with pride for many generations to come.

Structure Of The Poem

Is there aught you need that my hands withhold,
Rich gifts of raiment or grain or gold?
Lo! I have flung to the East and West
Priceless treasures torn from my breast,
And yielded the sons of my stricken womb
To the drum-beats of duty, the sabres of doom.

Gathered like pearls in their alien gravès
Silent they sleep by the Persian waves,
Scattered like shells on Egyptian sands,
They lie with pale brows and brave, broken hands,
They are strewn like blossoms mown down by chance
On the blood-brown meadows of Flanders and France.

Can ye measure the grief of the tears I weep
Or compass the woe of the watch I keep?
Or the pride that thrills thro’ my heart’s despair
And the hope that comforts the anguish of prayer?
And the far sad glorious vision I see
Of the torn red banners of Victory?

When the terror and tumult of hate shall cease
And life be refashioned on anvils of peace,
And your love shall offer memorial thanks
To the comrades who fought in your dauntless ranks,
And you honour the deeds of the deathless ones,
Remember the blood of my martyred sons!
The Gift of India is an elegy consisting of 24 lines and divided into 4 stanzas written in a lyrical vein. The poem has used couplet form with a definite rhyme scheme AABBCC which runs throughout the poem. Use of numerous figures of speech has enhanced the smooth flow of sense from one line to other as :

“ they are strewn like blossoms mown down by chance

On the blood-brown meadows of Flanders and France.”

The use of language is simple and provides a free flow of emotions.

Literary Devices Of The Poem

A number of figures of speech are employed in the poem to enhance the beauty of language. They are as follows:

1. Personification:

A figure of speech in which abstract ideas are invested with personality, and both inanimate and abstract ideas are endured with the attributes of living beings. In the poem, Country India is personified and given emotional attributes of living beings.

· “Remember the blood of my martyred sons!”.

· “ Can ye measure the grief of the tears I weep

Or compass the woe of the watch I keep?”

2. Metaphor:

A figure of speech in which a comparison between the two different things is implied, but not clearly stated. Examples of metaphor are:

· ‘ Priceless treasures’( line 3)

· ‘the sabers of doom’

· ‘the tumult of hate’

3. Alliteration:

· “Priceless treasures torn from my breast.”

· “They are strewn like blossoms mown down by chance.”

· Scattered like shells.

· “They lie with pale brows and brave broken hands.”

4. Rhetorical Questions:

· “Can you measure the grief of the tears I weep

Or compass the woe of the watch I keep?”

· “Is there ought you need that my hands withhold,

Rich gifts of raiment or grain or gold.”

5. Oxymoron:

· “And the far sad glorious vision I see.”

Theme Of The Poem

Courage and self-sacrifice: The Gift of India by Sarojini Naidu upholds the theme of courage and self-sacrifice of the Indian soldiers in the foreign land. It is highly surcharged with the sentiments of the poet towards the priceless souls who sacrificed their lives for the British cause in the First World War. The poem was penned by Sarojini Naidu in 1915 when India was under the colonial rule and wanted to pay homage to their utmost courage in the three strategic fronts by her poem.

In this poem, she has laid down the patriotic fervour by personifying Mother India. The soldiers were the priceless gems torn ruthlessly from the mother’s breasts and Indian sons were entrusted to their British masters. They did not know for what they were fighting. They yielded to ‘ the drum-beats of duty’ and fought till the last. This was the most precious gift of India- richer than the gifts of garments, grain or gold.

Thousands of miles away, the Indian soldiers fought bravely and laid down their lives. They have put forefront in strategic locations of enemy threat:

· Against Ottoman Empire(Persian waves)

· North Africa( Egyptian sands)

· Western Front(Medows of Flanders and France).

As a true patriot, Sarojini Naidu upholds the strong feeling of seeing her country free from the shackles of the British rule, and optimistic mood visualizes the world to return to the ‘anvils of peace’ where no son of India would be snatched ruthlessly from Mother India’s ‘stricken womb’ neither would they be ‘Shattered like shells on Egyptian sands’ lying there ‘ with pale brows and brave, broken hands’.

The poet seems to remind everybody- the English as well as Indians- that those who laid down their lives sincerely and honestly deserve to be commemorated. Their sacrifices should be acknowledged and honoured.

The Snail Poem Questions And Answers Class 10 West Bengal Board English

The Snail Poem Questions And Answers Class 10 West Bengal Board English

In this, you are going to go through The Snail Poem Questions And Answers Class 10 West Bengal Board English. Understanding a text meticulously in its totality is very important for a learner for scoring better in the West Bengal Board exam. Experts made ample to ensure a thorough explanation of questions and answers of The Snail Poem. Let us find The Snail Poem Questions And Answers Class 10 West Bengal Board English.

The Snail Poem Questions And Answers

1. Choose the correct alternative to complete the following.

a) With the slightest touch, the snail strings into its house with-

i) displeasure

ii) pleasure

iii) pain

iv) surprise.

Ans: i)

b) In its house, the snail leaves with-

i) parents

ii) friends

iii) relatives

iv) no one.

Ans: iv)

c) the snail lives is life like a-

i) traveller

ii) king

iii) vagabond

iv) hermit.

Ans: iv)

2. State whether the following statements are True or False. Provide sentences/phrases/words in support of your answer.

a) The snail fears to fall from the wall.

– False.

Supporting Statement: The snail sticks close, nor fears to fall.

b) The snail comes out of his house during a storm.

– False.

Supporting Statement: Within that house secure he hides when danger imminent betides of storm or other harm besides of weather.

3.Answer the following questions:

a) What does the snail usually stick itself to?

Ans: Usually the snail sticks itself to a grass or a leaf or a fruit or a wall.

b) What makes the snail well-satisfied?

Ans: The snail becomes well-satisfied to be his own whole world.

4. Change the following sentences into questions, as directed.

a) Siraj always rises early. (an interrogative sentence using ‘does’)

Ans Does Siraj always rises early?

b) Joyce is the best singer in the class. (Information question using ‘who’)

Ans: Who is the best singer in the class ?

c) He saw the rainbow. (Interrogative sentence using ‘did’)

Ans Did he see the rainbow?

d) I go to school by bus. (Information question using ‘how’)

Ans: How do you go to school?

5. Write a letter(within 100 words)to the editor of an English daily about the disturbances caused by the thoughtless use of loudspeakers.

College para,

Raiganj,

North Dinajpur,

733134.

The Editor,

Times of India,

Salt Lake , Kolkata,

7000036.

Subject: Disturbances caused because of loudspeakers.

I XXXXXX, on behalf of all my fellow mates want you to support us through your writing about the disturbances caused by the thoughtless use of loudspeakers. It’s really tough to concentrate during class hours. During exams, after working so hard we cannot concentrate during exams due to the unnecessary use of speakers. In front of our school, there is also a hospital,it is very hard for the patients to tolerate those noise.

Thousands of students like us are suffering the same problem every day and also the patients in the hospital. It’s my humble request to take a stand for us and do write something on this to warn the use of loudspeakers.

Thanking You,

Yours faithfully,

XXXXXX.

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