The Last Lesson Sample Questions CBSE Class 12 English

CBSE Class 12 English The Last Lesson Sample Questions

Answer the following questions in very short 5×1=5

  1. Name the blacksmith who talked with Franz while going to school.
  2. What was there under the arm of Mr. Hamel?
  3. What was the colour of the coat of Mr. Hamel?
  4. Name the river mentioned in the text.
  5. Which church services are mentioned in the text?

Answer the following in about 40-50 words(any six):- 6×3=18

  1. Acquaint us with the background of the story.
  2. Tell us about the bulletin board.
  3. What had been very different about the school that day?
  4. What had been the surprise in the classroom people?
  5. How did Mr. Hamel dress and why?
  6. How was Franz in his task in the class? How did he feel?
  7. How did Mr. Franz blame his parents and himself?
  8. How was the imparting of the lesson that day?
  9. Comment on the ending of the story.

Answer the following questions in about 200 words. (any two) 6×2=12

  1. How is “language “put in this story?
  2. How does the story criticize war?
  3. Evaluate Mr. Hamel as a teacher and Franz as a student.
  4. How does the story create a feeling of sympathy and melancholy?

The Last Lesson CBSE Class 12 English – About The Author

About The Author – The Last Lesson CBSE Class 12 English

Author – Alphonse Daude

Born – May 13, 1840, France

Died –  December 16, 1897, France

He was a famous Novelist, short story writer, playwright, and poet.

Famous Works:

  • Le petit chose
  • Les Amoureuses
  • Letters de Tarascon
  • Contes du Lundi

About The Story – The last lesson – Historical Background.

The story is set in the days of Franco – Prussian war. This war continued from 19 July 1870 to May 10, 1871. In this war, Germans were victorious which led them to the “Treaty of Frankfurt”. One of the main tenets of the treaty was the annexation of Alsace and Lorraine. This war was the revenge of the Germans against the French as Napoleon-I had smashed the German provinces during early Napoleonic wars.

The last lesson – Alsace and Lorraine

On 10th May 1971 by the Treaty of Frankfurt’ 93% of Alsace and 26% of Lorraine had been annexed. Until October 1, 1872, the residents of Alsace and Lorraine were given the option to choose between emigrating to France or staying in Alsace – Lorraine. Around one lakh residents had emigrated to France.

The last lesson – Language, the Identity of A nation

A nation is known by its language. They take pride in their language. Here the story “The Last Lesson” acquaints us with the innate feelings of the inhabitants of Alsace and Lorraine who are ordered to stop learning French in the schools and adopt German instead. The school teacher M. Hamel makes us feel the very painful last day of school. Little Franz and others felt to the core that they were dominated and as Frenchmen, their identity was in danger. With a morose heart the teacher, the students, and the inhabitants lamented as their mother tongue French was banned by Germany.

Some Important Lines Explained

1. “For the last two years all our bad news had come from there – the lost battles, the draft, the orders of the commanding officer – and I thought to myself, without stopping, “What can be the matter now?”

The bulletin – board had been the source of all of their negative news. Whenever they got a news bulletin, they would reckon that to be a misfortune for them. They received the news of the defeat of their Army in the Franco – Prussian war; the news the “The Treaty of Frankfurt”; the news of the annexation of Alsace and Lorraine and the news of the death bell for the French language.

2. “Don’t go so fast, dub; you’ll get to your school in plenty of time”

Watcher, the blacksmith made this scorning remark to Franz. Ironically he indicates that his going to school is futile. The bulletin board has brought news for them. Franz’s hurrying towards school is going to be meaningless as the school will lose the relevance to inhabitants of Alsace and Lorraine.

3. “What a thunder cap these words were to me!”

At the news of the last lesson, little Franz had become positively happy for he had been feeling blah towards studies. His getting rid of the studies made him mirthful. But he could not assess that what that meant. Almost immediately he envisaged the loss of his studies.

4. “Vive La France… School is dismissed – you may go.”

This concluding sentence is most emotional extending ourselves to feel the very pang of the French people of Alsace and Lorraine as they are ordered to change their heart, i.e. their mother tongue. Despite being ruled by the Germans, all the villagers and M. Hamel are true patriots when they utter “Vive La France” i.e. long live France. The order of the dismissal of the school implies the final dismissal for the school and learning.

Some Important Questions

  1. Bring out the symbolic importance of the bulletin board.
  2. How the language of the country is is the identity.
  3. Acquaint us with the background of the story.
  4. What difference did Franz find in the atmosphere of the school?
  5. What changes did Franz find in the classroom?
  6. What was Franz’s reaction when he heard that it was the last day of school?
  7. How was the performance of Franz on the last day?
  8. Whom did M. Hamel criticize for the failure of little Franz in acquiring the lessons ?
  9. “……….we must guard it, because when a people are enslaved, as long as they hold fast to their language it is as if they had the key to their prison”

Explain the line.

  1. How did M. Hamel teach on the last day and how did Franz learn on the last day?
  2. “Will they make them sing in German, even pigeons?” – Explain.
  3. How did the last lesson end?

Important Questions And Answers Of The Heart Of The Tree ICSE Class 9, 10

Important Questions And Answers Of The

Heart Of The Tree ICSE Class 9, 10

In this, you are going to go through Important Questions And Answers Of The Heart Of The Tree ICSE Class 9, 10. Understanding a text meticulously in its totality is very important for a learner for scoring better in the exam. Experts made ample to ensure a thorough analysis and understanding of the important questions and answers from the chapter The Heart Of The Tree. Let us find Important Questions And Answers Of The Heart Of The Tree ICSE Class 9, 10.

1. Why do you think the poet uses questions to begin his poem?

The poet uses questions to begin his poem to emphasize the theme he wants to convey to the readers and make it extraordinary. It’s not just a mere act of planting a tree. The poet makes one read in a different sense. He presents things as if they are unknown and very new. We are forced to think, by the poet in what he believes. Thus a simple act becomes too noble and subtle. This poetic technique is known as Hypophora.

2. Explain the line ‘He plants a friend of sun and sky.’

The poet Henry Cuyler Bunner, in his beautifully written poem, ”The heart of a Tree”, tells about planting trees and how they are inevitable to the harmonious existence of nature. The tree needs the sun and the sky for its life and in return nourishes them too. There is no perfect nature without the friendship of these three as they are most essential for any life form.

3. ”He plants the flag of breezes free”… What does the poet indicate by the flag of breezes?

The poet says that a man who plants a tree is not only planting a tree but he makes a free breeze possible for everyone. Because a tree once planted will grow in size covered with thick leaves which could generate winds and breeze. The poet indirectly wanted to say that trees give out life-sustaining air. And by doing this act, man becomes eco-friendly, thus saving the human race from pollution as well.

4. “He plants a home to heaven anigh”. What’s implied in this expression?

The following expression is from the poem,” The heart of a Tree”, by the American poet Henry Cuyler Bunner. The poet says that the man who plants a tree also makes possible a shelter for thousands of birds which at the time of sunset croon beautiful songs to the young ones and the feeling is heavenly for the rest of the others. He thus becomes equal to God who is the creator of heaven.

5. What is the meaning of hushed and happy twilight?

The poet Henry Cuyler Bunner, talks about the divine act of planting a tree. He wished to see it in a different way. He says that planting a tree is next to nothing. He who plants a tree also plants thousands of invisible virtues as well. The joyful songs of birds when the mother bird comes back on a quiet evening is a blissful experience. It is similar to heaven. The word ‘hushed’ means a time most probably evening when all the sounds subside and in that quiet and serene eve, the mother bird sings songs which can be called as lullabies to it’s your ones. The word’ twilight ‘means the time when evening gives way tonight. A golden hue pervades everywhere. The twilight is imagined as happy here but the happiness spreads everywhere.

6. What is meant by the treble of heaven’s harmony?

The poem” The heart of the Tree” is about the benefits of planting a tree. The poet talks about the man who plants a tree and the changes he brings in. He makes tree the abode of happiness for many birds and the happy songs of the birds, sitting on the branches of the tree, emulates heaven. The joyful chirps of the birds replicate the sounds of joyful heaven.

7. How does one can plant cool shade and tender rain?

The poet says that those who plant a tree also plant shades and rain. The poet reminds us that the trees give us shade from the scorching heat and are responsible for the rains. So he becomes an inevitable agent in connecting all the other elements of nature.

8. He plants the glory of the plain. Explain.

The poet Henry Cuyler Bunner in his poem “The heart of the Tree“, speaks about the virtues the tree possess. They add the aesthetic glory of a plain with their leaves, flowers, and fruits, in spite of being the life nourishers. A plain surrounded by hilly rocks would seem dry like a desert if there are no trees at all.

9. And plants the forest’s heritage…

What do you comprehend from the above expression?

The above expression is from the poem, “The Heart of the Tree.” The poet talks about the benefits the tree causes. One who plants a tree secures the future generations by providing them a pollution free world. A tree makes more of them and turns into a forest which can be a legacy for the coming generations. Thus, he keeps aside a valuable treasure.

10. Explain, “The joy that unborn eyes shall see “

The poet Henry Cuyler Bunner says that those who plant trees are part of the process of the cycle of nature. A tree would breed thousands other trees and the forthcoming generations which are yet to born will be overjoyed to accept such a legacy.

11. What does the poet hint by ‘ He plants, in sap and leaf and wood

In love of home and loyalty

And far-cast thought of civic good “?

The above lines are from the poem “The heart of the Tree”. The poet goes on talking about the nobility of the man who plants a tree. He does good for the common good. He becomes an example instilling in others the need to protect nature and live in a pollution free world. Such a man thinks not only for his immediate good but for the future as well. He is a true human.

12. “Who in the hollow of his hand

Holds all the growth of all our land.

How can one hold the growth of the land” Explain?

In the above lines, the poet speaks about the man who plants a tree could hold the growth of the land. He indirectly points out that trees are vital in the lives of people. All the growth of humankind depends on trees. Someone who plants a tree thinks much about the world and harmonious existence. Hence, he could foresee the growth of the land.

13. “A nation’s growth from sea to sea

Stirs in his heart who plants a tree”… What does the poet mean by this?

The above lines indicate the importance of planting trees in building nations. The resources tree could provide for the growth of a nation is undeniable. Hence someone who plants a tree thinks about the welfare of his nation too. He is discharging his civic duties as well.

14. Find out examples for personification from the poem ‘The heart of a Tree. ‘

Giving personal attributes to inanimate and non-living things are known as personifies. Normally abstract ideas are given such personal traits. For example, the poet personifies The tree in the line, ‘a friend of sun and sky’.

15. Find out the figure of speech implied in the line ‘hushed and happy twilight ‘

The figure of speech due in the line “hushed and happy twilight ” is known as a transferred epithet. It is a figure of speech where an adjective grammatically qualifies a noun other than the person think it is actually describing. Here twilight is not supposed to be happy, but the people surrounding it are.

16. Find out an instance of a metaphor from the poem.

Metaphors are figures of speech that compare two distinctly different things indirectly.
The branches of the tree are compared to a flag in the Line, “He plants the flag of breezes free “

17. What is alliteration? Find out an instance for the same from the poem “The heart of a tree”

The repetition of consonant sounds, at the beginning of the words, is called as alliteration. It gives a rhythmic quality to the poem. Example… “He plants a home to heaven high”.The use of metaphors lend the poem it’s poetic enhancements. Lines tend to be more poetic.

NCERT Solutions for Class 12 English Flamingo Chapter 2 Lost Spring

NCERT Solutions for Class 12 English Flamingo Chapter 2 Lost Spring is a detailed account of what you will learn in Lost Spring Chapter 2 Class 12 English. To successfully pass CBSE Class 12 English exam and get an excellent grade on your report card at the end of it all you need a thorough understanding and comprehension of NCERT Solutions for Class 12 English Flamingo Chapter 2 Lost Spring which we have made sure covers everything important! 

Lost Spring NCERT Solutions for Class 12 English Flamingo Chapter 2

Lost Spring NCERT Text Book Questions and Answers

Lost Spring Think as you read

Question 1.
What is Saheb looking for in the garbage dumps? Where is he and where has he come from?
Answer:
Saheb is looking for some silver coins or currency note. It is as valuable as gold for him. He is in Seemapuri (Delhi) and had come from Bangladesh.

Question 2.
What explanation does the author offer for the children not wearing footwear?
Answer:
The author argues that the children are poor, so they could not afford to have any shoes.

Question 3.
Is Saheb happy working at the tea stall? How do you know?
Answer:
Saheb is not happy working at the tea stall. He is no longer his master and that relaxed look on his face is also lost. The steel canister seems heavier than the plastic bag that he would carry so lightly over his shoulder. It was because the bag was his and the canister belonged to the man who owned the tea stall. He had lost his independence and he was bound by time to lead a life of servility.

NCERT Solutions for Class 12 English Flamingo Chapter 2 Lost Spring

Question 4.
What makes the city of Firozabad famous?
Answer:
Firozabad is the centre of India’s glass-blowing industry.

Question 5.
Mention the hazards of working in the glass bangle industry.
Answer:
There are a lot of hazards of working in a bangle factory. They are badly lit and have bad ventilation. It requires continuous bending over the furnace. All these lead to a lot of health issues. Men have to work in dingy cells without air and light. As a result, they lose the brightness of their eyes and go blind with the dust from polishing the glass bangles.

Question 6.
How is Mukesh’s attitude to his situation different from that of his family?
Answer: Mukesh tries to break away from the family tradition of making bangles. This was more like a rebellion since no one had ever tried to move away from this trade. Mukesh wanted to carve a niche for himself. He wanted to be different. He wanted to become a car mechanic.

Lost Spring Understanding the Text

Question 1.
What could be some of the reasons for the migration of people from villages to cities?
Answer:
Their fields and homes could have been swept away by frequent floods because of which they had nothing to eat. Thus, they had to leave their homes and come to the cities.

Question 2.
Would you agree that promises made to poor children are rarely kept? Why do you think this happens in the incidents narrated in the text?
Answer:
Promises made to the poor are rarely kept. In the text, when the author meets Saheb, she encourages him to study and offers to open a school. Her unfulfilled promise disappoints Saheb.

Question 3.
What forces conspire to keep the workers in the bangle industry of Firozabad in poverty?
Answer:
They include sahukars, middlemen, policemen, bureaucrats and politicians who exploit them.

Lost Spring Talking about the text

Question 1.
How, in your opinion, can Mukesh realise his dream?
Answer:
Mukesh’s aim in life was to become a motor mechanic. Yes, it indeed was possible to realise his dreams through his hard work and determination. He walked all the way to a garage, far away from his house, to learn the nuances of being a motor mechanic. He can realise his dream by working at some garage and learning the job of a motor mechanic.

NCERT Solutions for Class 12 English Flamingo Chapter 2 Lost Spring

Question 2.
Mention the hazards of working in the glass bangles industry.
Answer:
The glass bangles industry has many health hazards. It usually employs small children. It is illegal to employ very young children. They work in the glass furnaces with high temperatures. The dingy cells, where they work are without air and light. They weld pieces of coloured glass into circles of bangles. Their eyes are more adjusted to the dark. Therefore, they often end up losing their eyesight before they become adults.

Question 3.
Why should child labour be eliminated and how?
Answer:
Child labour is an inhuman practice. It should be eliminated by educating the children and banning it too. The parents who send their children for cheap labour, must be made aware of the fact that it is a crime to make little children work.

Lost Spring Extra Questions and Answers

Lost Spring Short Answer Questions

Question 1.
Why does the author say that the bangle-makers are caught in a vicious web?
Answer:
The author says that bangle-makers are caught in a vicious web because they are not able to form co-operative societies for their betterment and are forced to follow and obey sahukars and policemen.

Question 2.
Who is Mukesh? What is his dream?
Answer:
Mukesh is the son of a poor bangle-maker of Firozabad. He dreams of becoming a motor mechanic and a car driver. In fact, he insists on becoming his own master.

Question 3.
Why could the bangle-makers not organise themselves into a co-operative?
Answer:
Most of the young bangle-makers have fallen into the trap of the middlemen. They are also afraid of the police. They know that the police will haul them up, beat them and drag to jail for doing something illegal. There is no leader among them to help them see things differently.

NCERT Solutions for Class 12 English Flamingo Chapter 2 Lost Spring

Question 4.
What does the writer mean when she says, ‘Saheb is no longer his own master’?
Answer:
The writer meant that till Saheb was a ragpicker, he was a carefree boy, who would work, have time for himself and enjoy the work he was doing. But from the time he had started working in a stall with others supervising his work, he changed. He had to become responsible and could not be free like earlier. He was no longer his own master.

Question 5.
What does the title ‘Lost Spring’ convey?
Answer:
Spring is associated with childhood. Like spring, a child blooms in childhood. However, abject poverty and thoughtless traditions result in the loss of child-like innocence and much needed education. Millions of children like Saheb and Mukesh lose the spring in their lives because they are compelled to do hazardous work to provide a living for their family and themselves. Thus, the title brings out the dejected life of the child labourers and their deprivation of the blessings of childhood.

Question 6.
What is the condition of the children working in the glass furnaces of Firozabad?
Answer:
More than 20,000 children illegally work in the glass blowing factories in Firozabad. They work around furnaces in high temperature to weld glasses. They work in dingy cells without light and air. Their eyes are adjusted more to the dark than to the light outside. They work all day long. Many of them lose their eyesight before they become adults.

Question 7.
Why don’t the younger ones of the bangle-makers do anything else?
Answer:
The years of mind numbing and hard toil kill the desire of making new attempts to improve their condition and the ability to dream. In Firozabad, doing any other work needs rebellion, strong will and the determination of the bangle-makers to do something go along with the family tradition because of lack of awareness, education and opportunities.

NCERT Solutions for Class 12 English Flamingo Chapter 2 Lost Spring

Question 8.
What did garbage mean to the children of Seemapuri and to their parents?
Answer:
For elders of Seemapuri, since they are ragpickers, garbage is a means of survival. However, to the children of Seemapuri, garbage is wrapped in wonder. Sometimes, they expect to find a coin, which raises their hope of finding more.

Question 9.
What does Saheb look for in the garbage dumps?
Answer:
Saheb looks for some silver coins or currency note. It is as valuable as gold for him.

Question 10.
“It is his karam, his destiny”. What is Mukesh’s family’s attitude towards their situation?
Answer:
Mukesh’s grandmother regards it as their destiny. She says that they were born in the caste of bangle-makers and have seen nothing but bangles in their lives. Mukesh’s family had mutely accepted it as their destiny and had stopped taking any initiative to change their fate.

Question 11.
How is the bangle industry of Firozabad a curse for the bangle-makers?
Answer:
Men have to work in dingy cells without air and light. As a result, they lose the brightness of their eyes and go blind with the dust from polishing the glass bangles. They are also exploited by moneylenders, police, bureaucrats and politicians. They live in a state of intense poverty and have to go without food for days. Therefore, it is a curse for them.

NCERT Solutions for Class 12 English Flamingo Chapter 2 Lost Spring

Question 12.
Describe the irony in Saheb’s name.
Answer:
Saheb’s full name is Saheb-e-Alam which means ‘Lord of the Universe’. But in stark contrast to his name, Saheb is poverty-stricken, barefoot, homeless ragpicker who scrounges the garbage dumps of Delhi for his livelihood. His name is in total contrast to his very existence and is thus, ironical.

Question 13.
What does the reference to chappals in ‘Lost Spring’ tell us about the economic condition of the ragpickers?
Answer:
The ragpickers were extremely poor. They did not have any money to buy chappals. They were poor and impoverished. They lived a hand-to-mouth existence. They were exploited and had no other work to do. They did not have a house to live in too.

Question 14.
“Listening to them, I see two distinct worlds…” In the context of Mukesh, the bangle- maker’s son, which two worlds is Anees Jung referring to?
Answer:
The author, Anees Jung very distinctly sees the two worlds of the bangle-makers and the makers of the society. On one side exists the poverty-stricken families burdened by the stigma of caste, illiteracy, pall and gloom, while on the other side, there is the sahukars, middlemen, policemen, keepers of law and the bureaucrats, who ensure that these poor people continue to be entangled in the vicious circle of poverty. Both these worlds are in stark contrast to each other.

Question 15.
Why did Saheb’s parents leave Dhaka and migrate to India?
Answer:
Saheb’s parents belonged to Dhaka in Bangladesh, where they lived amidst green fields. They and the other ragpickers left their homes many years ago and migrated to India in search of a livelihood, as their homes and fields were destroyed in storms. This forced them to come to India, where they settled in the slums of Seemapuri.

Question 16.
What job did Saheb take up? Was he happy?
Answer:
Saheb took up work at a tea stall, where he had to perform several odd jobs, including
getting milk from the milk booth. He was not happy, as he had lost his independence. Though he earned ? 800 and got all his meals free, he was no longer his own master.

Question 17.
Whom does Anees Jung blame for the sorry plight of the bangle-makers?
Answer:
Anees Jung blames the middlemen, the policemen, the lawmakers, the bureaucrats and the politicians for the sorry plight of the bangle-makers. These people conspire and exploit the poor bangle-makers. They pay them meagre wages, do not let them form co-operatives, and compel their children to join the same trade at an early age.

Question 18.
What was Mukesh’s dream? In your opinion, did he achieve his dream?
Answer:
Mukesh’s dream was to become a motor-mechanic. It is no doubt difficult for Mukesh to achieve his dream, as he is torn between his desires and his family tradition, which he cannot escape. Besides, he has to face a number of obstacles in the form of sahukars, middlemen, bureaucrats, lawmakers, politicians, etc. However, his will to work hard, and his strong determination could make him achieve his dream.

Question 19.
In spite of despair and disease pervading the lives of the slum children, they are not devoid of hope. How far do you agree?
Answer:
In spite of growing up amidst despair and disease, children who live in the slum have the desire to achieve something big in life like Mukesh. This shows that they are not devoid of hope. Saheb, a ragpicker, is eager to go to a school and learn. Mukesh, who , works in dark, dingy cells, dreams of becoming a motor mechanic, which is very much against his family tradition.

NCERT Solutions for Class 12 English Flamingo Chapter 2 Lost Spring

Question 20.
Was Saheb happy working at the tea stall?
Answer:
No, Saheb was not happy working at the tea stall. He had lost his carefree look. He was less contented as he was burdened with responsibilities. The rag-picking plastic bag though heavy, seemed lighter than the steel canister.

Lost Spring Long Answer Questions

Question 1.
Grinding poverty and tradition condemn the children of ragpickers or bangle-makers to a life of exploitation. Such children are deprived of all opportunities in life. Mukesh, who opts out of the existing profession of his forefathers by resolving to start a new job of a motor mechanic symbolises the modem youth. What lesson do we learn from Mukesh’s example?
Answer:
It is not only the grinding poverty but also the tradition that condemns the children of ragpickers or bangle-makers to live a life of exploitation. On one side is the family, trapped in poverty and burdened by stigma of the caste they are born in, on the other side, they are trapped in the vicious circle of inhuman sahukars, the middlemen, the policemen, the so-called keepers of law, the bureaucrats and the politicians. All of them have created a situation from which there is no way out.

The trapped do not have the guts to break out of it. Mukesh, in fact, is like a ray of hope with his dreams of becoming a motor mechanic. He wants to opt out of the existing profession of his forefathers. He has resolved to start a new job as a motor mechanic. The long distance to the garage where he will learn the work of a motor mechanic does not deter him. He is prepared to walk. But he is firm. He symbolises the youth of his clan. If this persists, the day is not far when a new generation will bring brightness and hope to the dark and dingy homes of these poverty-ridden workers.

Question 2.
How is Mukesh more ambitious in life than Saheb? Give a reasoned answer.
OR
How is Mukesh’s attitude towards his situation different from that of Saheb? Why?
Answer:
Mukesh is definitely more ambitious than Saheb. Unlike most of his friends in Firozabad, Mukesh did not want to follow the profession of making bangles. No one else could dare to think of breaking the conventional style of living. Mukesh dreamt of becoming a motor mechanic. He had already decided to go to a garage and learn about cars. Though the garage was a long way from his home, he was prepared to walk that distance. He insisted on becoming his own master.

Saheb, on the other hand, had sacrificed his freedom as a ragpicker to take up a salaried job that would pay him 800 rupees and give him all his meals. Now, he was no longer his own master. He had lost his carefree look (which he had when he was a ragpicker). The can that he carried seemed heavier than the bag he carried as a ragpicker, for this job was not to his liking.

NCERT Solutions for Class 12 English Flamingo Chapter 2 Lost Spring

Question 3.
The barefoot ragpickers of Seemapuri live on the periphery of Delhi, yet metaphorically speaking, miles away from it. Comment
Answer:
The barefoot ragpickers of Seemapuri live on the periphery of Delhi, yet metaphorically speaking, miles away from it, sums up the true condition of the ragpickers of Seemapuri. Seemapuri is a slum area, which houses approximately 10,000 ragpickers. They live in mud houses with roofs of tin and tarpaulin. There is no sewage, drainage or running water. They came here from Bangladesh in 1971 and have been living here ever since without any identity of their own or permits, but they have ration cards and their names figure in the voter’s list.

Women wear tattered saris. Survival in Seemapuri means ragpicking. This is an example of the gross negligence and apathy of the Delhi Government. It has failed to do anything for them. Though Seemapuri is so close to Delhi, almost on its periphery, but the glitter and glamour advantages like education,proper facilities for living a clean and decent life are beyond the reach of these slum dwellers of Seemapuri, which is so close to Delhi, yet so far.

Question 4.
The bangle-makers of Firozabad make beautiful bangles and make everyone happy, but they live and die in squalor. Elaborate.
Answer:
The bangle-makers of Firozabad live in utter poverty, generation after generation. They believe that they are the people who are destined to work as glass bangle- makers. They make beautiful bangles for women, but they live in the dark. The workers have to look at the hot bright furnaces while polishing bangles. While welding pieces of coloured glass into bangles, they have no other option but are forced to sit near flickering lamps. Hence, they are forced to stay in dark room huts and their eyes are not in a position to see the daylight outside. They become blind quite early in life. They are in a vicious circle tossed around by moneylenders, middlemen and politicians. Instead of helping them, the law enforcing authorities only prey on them.

Question 5.
Give a brief account of the life and activities of people like Saheb-e-Alam settled in Seemapuri.
Answer:
Saheb is a poor boy belonging to a refugee family from Bangladesh. His family came to Delhi and settled in the trans-Yamuna area called Seemapuri. Here, they have no work to do. They pick garbage for their livelihood. Saheb also, like others, looks and searches the garbage dumps for some coins.

They leave their houses in the morning with a bag on their back to collect something from the garbage. They remain barefoot. It has become their habit not to wear any footwear. The families like Saheb’s left behind a life of abject poverty in flood-hit areas of Bangladesh and came to India. They move to big cities in the hope of getting some work. In the absence of work, they begin ragpicking.

Question 6.
‘Lost Spring’ explains the grinding poverty and traditions that condemn thousands of people to a life of abject poverty. Do you agree? Why/Why not?
Answer:
Yes, I fully agree that ‘Lost Spring’ explains abject poverty. Saheb-e-Alam came along with his family from Bangladesh to Delhi. His family settled on the banks of the Yamuna river. Here, they have no work to do and no house to live in. So they began the work of ragpicking. His family lives a hand-to-mouth existence. Thus, this lesson deals with the plight of street children like Saheb-e-Alam, and Mukesh of Firozabad working in a glass bangle factory. The children of such families are forced to labour early in life and denied the opportunities of going to school. These children are trapped in the vicious circle of social stigma, tradition, poverty and exploitation. Thus, the title of the story rightly explains and brings out the depravity of child labour in our country.

Question 7.
What contrast do you notice between the colour of the bangles and the atmosphere of the place where these bangles are made?
Answer:
The dusty streets of Firozabad, the bangle-making district, are overflowing with garbage and the stink is overwhelming. The hovels where the bangle-makers dwell have walls that are crumbling down, with unstable doors and no windows. The conditions are so terrible that families of humans and animals live together.

The drabness and lack of colour in the lives of these people contrast starkly with the colour of the bangles which lie everywhere “sunny gold, paddy green, royal blue, pink, purple, every colour born out of the seven colours of the rainbow”. The unhappiness and tedium in the lives of the bangle-makers contrasts the joy and merriment that their bangles will bring to the women who will buy and wear them.

NCERT Solutions for Class 12 English Flamingo Chapter 2 Lost Spring

Question 8.
What did the writer see when Mukesh took her to his home?
Answer:
The writer realised that it was a slum area. The lanes were stinking and were choked with garbage. The homes looked like hovels. Their walls were crumbling. The doors were wobbly, with no windows. The homes were crowded with humans and animals living together. Mukesh’s home looked like a half-built shack. In one of its parts, a firewood stove had a large vessel on it.

A frail young woman cooked the evening meal. She was the wife of Mukesh’s elder brother. As Mukesh’s father came in, she brought her veil closer to her face. The old man was a poor bangle-maker. Even after long years of hard labour, he had been unable to renovate his house. He was unable to send his two sons to school. Mukesh’s grandmother was also there. Her husband had become blind with dust from the polishing of glass bangles.

Question 9.
Describe the difficulties the bangle-makers of Firozabad have to face in their lives.
OR
Describe the circumstances which keep the workers in the bangle industry in poverty.
Answer:
The bangle-makers of Firozabad live in utter poverty generation after generation. They believe that they are the people who are destined to work as glass bangle-makers. They make beautiful bangles for women but they live in dark. The workers have to look at the hot bright furnaces while polishing bangles. While welding pieces of coloured glass into bangles, they have no other option but are forced to sit near flickering lamps. Hence, they are forced to stay in a dark room and their eyes are not in a position to see the daylight outside. They become blind even before they become adults. Their life is embroiled in a web that is created by the moneylenders, middlemen and politicians. Instead of helping them, the law enforcing authorities only prey upon their misfortunes.

Question 10.
In the lesson ‘Lost Spring’, Saheb and Mukesh are deprived of their childhood pleasures and education. Nobel Peace prize winners Kailash Satyarthi and Malala Yousafzai have been fighting for the rights of the children. Motivated by these activists, you write an article on the topic, ‘Evils of child labour and denial of education’. You are Mahesh/Malvika. Write your article in about 125-150 words.
Answer:
Evils Of Child Labour and Denial Of Education
By Malvika
Child labour has been a major problem not only in India but also in all the developing countries. It is a great social problem. We often find children working in dhabas, factories, tea stalls, fields and homes. They often become ragpickers and street performers. All this deprives children of a normal, carefree childhood. Schooling becomes a distant dream, and a perpetual state of poverty becomes a reality. Dreams become a mirage.

Child labour is often borne out of the need for survival. Often the reason is to increase the income of a poor family. Industries often employ children under 14, in the hope of reducing the labour cost in their organisation.
In a developed society, where every citizen counts and all citizens have to have proper education, health care support, games and entertainment, a child with less or absolutely . no education finds it hard to survive.

Taking up a small job as a domestic help or in a restaurant for a nominal salary of ₹ 750-1800 per month, does not leave a child with enough time for primary and secondary education. All this renders a child completely illiterate, unskilled and perhaps unhealthy. Free education should be provided to poor children to motivate their parents to send them to school.

The government should come forward with schemes for upliftment of the poor and unemployed. This will take away the burden of earning their livelihood from the tender shoulders of poor children. Hence, no child should be engaged as labourers, both from a legal point of view as well in the interest of the child’s future.

Question 11.
“Butpromises like mine abound… in their bleak world.” Saheb and others like him spend their life on unfulfilled promises. One role that the youth can play to improve their conditions is by volunteering in programmes like, ‘Each one Teach one’. You are Vibha Raghunathan, the Head Girl of Bal Vidyalaya, Rohtak. You and some other students of the school are touched by the plight of the slum kids, who would love to be educated but can’t because of their poor economic conditions. You and your friends wish to make a difference by teaching these kids. Draft a notice, in not more than 50 words, making an appeal for generous help and inviting other students for the same purpose.
Answer:
Bal Vidyalaya, Rohtak
Notice
11 May 20XX
Eact One Teach One
A school trip is being planned to the nearby slums on every Sunday. The purpose of this trip is to teach the slum children. Those who are interested in being a part of this noble cause can attend a meeting at 4:00 p.m. on Tuesday, 2 June 20XX at the school auditorium.
Vibha Raghunathan
Head Girl

Question 12.
Garbage to them is gold. How do ragpickers of Seemapuri survive?
Answer:
Seemapuri is on the outskirts of Delhi. It is comprised of migrants from Bangladesh who survived through ragpicking. These refugees are provided with no amenities of sewage, drainage or running water and is unlike the life of glitter and glamour in Delhi. Poverty prevails here from corner to corner. Ragpicking meant survival for them. It assumed proportions of fine art.

For the children of course it proves to be fun. They scrounge through the garbage to discover valuables in them. Saheb, the main character has resigned to this life. The ragpickers who came here way back in 1971, live in mud houses, with roofs of tin and tarpaulin. For all these years, they have had no identity, ho permits yet possess ration cards and have their names in the voter’s list. All of them know that garbage would ensure their daily bread and a roof above their heads.

NCERT Solutions for Class 12 English Flamingo Chapter 2 Lost Spring

Question 13.
For the children it is wrapped in wonder, for the elders it is a means of survival.” What kind of life do the ragpickers of Seemapuri lead?
Answer:
Seemapuri is on the outskirts of Delhi, comprising migrants from Bangladesh, who survived by way of ragpicking. These refugees, who settled down here in 1971 have no amenities of sewage, drainage or running water and is unlike the life of glitter and glamour in Delhi. Poverty prevails here from corner to corner. Ragpicking is the only means of survival for them and at times it assumes proportions of fine art. For the children of course it proves to be fun and they scrounge through the garbage to discover valuables in them.

Saheb, the main character has resigned to this life. The dwellers here live in mud houses, with roofs of tin and tarpaulin. For all these years, they have had no identity, no permits yet possess ration cards and have their names in the voter’s list. All of them know that garbage would ensure their daily bread and a roof above their head.

Question 14.
What change do you find in Saheb’s life when he stops ragpicking and starts working at a tea stall?
Answer:
When Saheb started working at the tea stall, his face lost the carefree look which he used to have when he was a rag picker. He was no longer his own master now. He had to do what the owner of the tea stall asked him to do. He carried heavy metal canisters, instead of light plastic bags and these canisters were not even his own. The plastic bags were his own. He was not happy working at the tea stall as he had lost his freedom.

Question 15.
Do the poor have the right to dream? Why then does the author call Mukesh’s dream ‘a mirage’?
Answer:
Dream comes naturally, and everybody has a right to it whether rich or poor. It is true that Mukesh had challenges in life, but he was very optimistic though the dream was like a mirage for him. He belonged to a family that was in the marginalised category of the society. He disliked his profession of bangle-making that blinded children at an early age and gave no proper food or shelter.

He wanted to become a motor mechanic even though he had been working for years in the bangle-making factory. He knew about the vicious circle of politicians and middlemen, yet he had a dream to fulfill one day.

 

A learner needs to read stories thoroughly and accurately to score better in CBSE Class 12 English exams. NCERT Solutions for Class 12 English Flamingo Chapter 2 Lost Spring has been answered by experts to ensure that the story can be easily understood. 

NCERT Solutions for Class 12 English Flamingo Chapter 1 The Last Lesson

NCERT Solutions for Class 12 English Flamingo Chapter 1 The Last Lesson is a detailed account of what you will learn in The Last Lesson Chapter 1 Class 12 English. To successfully pass CBSE Class 12 English exam and get an excellent grade on your report card at the end of it all you need a thorough understanding and comprehension of NCERT Solutions for Class 12 English, Flamingo Chapter 1 The Last Lesson Class 12 English which we have made sure covers everything important! Check out about The Last Lesson author, Alphonse Daude, and some The Last Lesson sample questions.

The Last Lesson NCERT Solutions for Class 12 English Flamingo Chapter 1

The Last Lesson NCERT Text Book Questions and Answers

The Last Lesson Think as you read

Question 1.
What was Franz expected to be prepared with for school that day?
Answer:
Franz was expected to be prepared with participles. Mr Hamel had told the class that he would be taking a test on the topic that day.

Question 2.
What did Franz notice that was usual about the school that day?
Answer:
Usually when the school begins, there would be a lot of commotions. But that day, everything was quiet and it appeared to be like a Sunday, but the students were at their places and Mr Hamel was walking up and down with his terrible iron ruler under his arm.

Question 3.
What had been put up on the bulletin board?
Answer:
The bulletin-board notified the general public about an order from Berlin. It stated that only German will be taught to the students in the schools of Alsace and Lorraine.

Question 4.
What changes did the order from Berlin cause in school that day?
Answer:
The order from Berlin brought all the routine hustle-bustle of the school life to a stand¬still. The teacher, M. Hamel became more sympathetic to his students and taught his lessons with more patience. The students became more attentive in their classes. The villagers were sitting at the usually empty back benches and had come to show their respect and gratitude to M. Hamel.

They regretted not going to school. The order also brought about a great change in people’s feelings towards their country and their native language. There was a general sadness about not being able to utilise the opportunities of learning French when it was possible to do so.

Question 5.
How did Franz’s feelings about M. Hamel and the school change?
Answer:
Franz was shocked when M. Hamel told the students about the order from Berlin and that it was their last French lesson. He forgot about his teacher’s ruler and crankiness. He developed a sudden fondness for M. Hamel, and was disturbed by the idea of being separated from him forever. He understood the pain and agony his teacher was undergoing. And he became more sympathetic towards his teacher.

His school, too, now carried a different meaning. His books and lessons seemed old friends, whom he couldn’t give up. He realised with pain that how much French meant to him and regretted not being attentive in his classes earlier. Suddenly, he felt that the ‘difficult concepts’ had never actually been difficult.

The Last Lesson Understanding the Text

Question 1.
The people in this story suddenly realise how precious their language is to them. What shows you this? Why does this happen?
Answer:
M. Hamel told the students and the villagers that henceforth only German would be taught in the schools of Alsace and Lorraine. Those who called themselves Frenchmen would neither be able to speak nor write it. He praised French as the most beautiful, the clearest and the most logical language in the world. He said that for the enslaved people that their language was the key out of prison. Only then the people realised the importance of their language. This shows people’s love for their own culture, traditions and country. Pride in one’s language reflects pride in the motherland.

Question 2.
Franz thinks, “Will they make them sing in German, even the pigeons?” What could this mean?
Answer:
Alphonse Daudet’s ‘The Last Lesson’ very prominently raises the question of linguistic and cultural hegemony of the colonial and imperial powers and their lust for controlling the world and influencing their cultures and identities. Enforcement of German on the defeated nation was a way of realising this. The order to teach German rather than . French in schools was released.

Franz is flabbergasted on hearing this and understands that this order would deprive him of learning his mother tongue. He also wondered if the pigeons would have to coo in German. By compelling them to use a foreign language was like snatching away their language from them, which he felt would be unfair and unkind.

The language was as natural to them as cooing is to the pigeon. So compulsion to speak another language is like dominating the force of nature and enslaving it. As it is next to impossible to alter the way pigeons sing, the same way, it is difficult for people to accept a language which is forcibly imposed on them. Adopting a new language causes pain and discomfort.
Or
This sentence could possibly mean that however hard the authorities try to embed German language in the culture of Alsace and Lorraine, the natural status of French for them, will remain unchanged. French flows in the air and the entire place is full of its effect. Even though they train students in German, the basic mode of communication would remain unchanged like the cooing of the pigeons.

The Last Lesson Talking about the Text

Question 1.
“When people are enslaved, as long as they hold fast to their language it is as if they had the key to their prison.” Can you think of examples in history where a conquered people had their language taken away from them or had a language imposed on them?
Answer:
Some examples of the native language taken away from its people and/or imposition of the language of the conqueror are:

  • Portuguese becoming the lingua franca of Angola.
  • English imposed on the various Celtic people.
  • Spanish imposed on the Basques and the Catalans.
  • Turkish imposed on the Kurds.

Question 2.
What happens to a linguistic minority in a state? How do you think they can keep their language alive? For example:
Punjabis in Bangalore
Tamilians in Mumbai
Kannadigas in Delhi
Gujaratis in Kolkata
Answer:
A linguistic minority in a state does not have as much liberty to exercise linguistic skills as the natives of the state. They initially try to learn the jargons in order to cope with the day-to-day activities and finally begin to understand the native language with regular interaction. At the workplace and educational organisations, English or the link language helps a lot to cope with the work and learning process. But when it comes to understanding the basic norms of the society, in order to socialise, one does face a sort of linguistic barrier during communication.

To keep their language alive, the linguistic minorities can form small communities where . they can celebrate their festivals as per their traditions. Moreover, they can continue to speak their native language at their homes in order to make their children learn the language. People must even try to visit their native places at regular intervals in order to stay close to their roots.

Question 3.
Is it possible to carry pride in one’s language too far? Do you know what ‘linguistic chauvinism’ means?
Answer:
Yes, it is possible to carry pride in one’s language too far if one is fond of one’s own language at the cost of belittling of other languages. Indifference towards other languages is not healthy for any democracy like India.

When the sense of belonging to one’s own language crosses the thin line between ‘pride’ and ‘proud’, it becomes linguistic chauvinism. If people feel good about their language and traditions, they must have tolerance for other languages too. Everybody has the right to follow the religion as well as speak the language as per their choice.

The Last Lesson Working with Words

Notice the underlined words in these sentences and tick the option that best explains their meanings.
(a) “What a thunderclap these words were to me!”
The words were
(i) loud and clear.
(ii) startling and unexpected.
(iii) pleasant and welcome.

(b) “When people are enslaved, as long as they hold fast to their language it is as if they had the key to their prison.”
It is as if they have the key to the prison as long as they
(i) do not lose their language.
(ii) are attached to their language.
(iii) quickly learn the conqueror’s language

(c) Don’t go so fast, you will get to your school in plenty of time.
You will get to your school
(i) very late.
(ii) too early.
(iii) early enough.

(d) I never saw him look so tall.
M. Hamel
(i) had grown physically taller.
(ii) seemed very confident.
(iii) stood on the chair.
Answer:
(a) (ii) startling and unexpected.
(b) (ii) are attached to their language.
(c) (iii) early enough.
(d) (ii) seemed very confident.

The Last Lesson Extra Questions and Answers

The Last Lesson Short Answer Questions

Question 1.
How was the scene in the school, on the morning of the last lesson, different from thaton other days?
OR
How was M. Hamel’s class different the day Franz went late to school?
Answer:
Generally, there would be a great bustle, closing and shutting of desks, lessons repeated loudly in unison, rapping of the teachers’ ruler on the table, all of which could be heard out in the street. But that everything was quite different. There was no noise. All were in their seats, Franz walked in late and M. Hamel let him calmly. He then noticed that his sir was dressed in his best clothes and there were the elders of the village seated in the class. It was a bit later that Franz realised why the day was different. It was their last French lesson.

Question 2.
How does M. Hamel pay a tribute to the French language?
OR
What did M. Hamel tell them about the French language? What did he ask them to do and why?
Answer:
M. Hamel went on to talk about French language. He told that it was the most beautiful language of the world. It was the clearest and the most logical of all languages. He asked the people to guard it among themselves and never forget it. As long as people ‘hold fast to their language, they have the key to freedom’.

Question 3.
One order from Berlin changed the scenario of the school. Comment.
Answer:
The order from Berlin led to the announcement that French would not be taught anymore, and instead, German would be taught by a new master. This was to be their last French lesson. The class was quiet as it was a Sunday morning with no hustle and bustle. The teacher, M. Hamel was patient and calm but inwardly emotional. He was in his special dress. The sad villagers were sitting on the last benches like the other students and the teacher explained the lesson very patiently.

Question 4.
“What a thunderclap these words were to me!” Which were the words that shocked and surprised little Franz?
Answer:
M. Hamel said, “My children, this is the last French lesson I shall give you. The order has come from Berlin to teach only German in the schools of Alsace and Lorraine. The new master will come tomorrow. This is your last French lesson. I want you to be attentive”. These words of his teacher were a thunderclap for Franz.

Question 5.
Who did M. Hamel blame for the neglect of learning on the part of boys like Franz?
Answer:
M. Hamel blamed the parents for the neglect of learning of French language as they engaged the boys in farm work. He also blamed himself to some extent as he too assigned the work of gardening to boys like Franz. He also gave them a holiday whenever he wanted to go for fishing.

Question 6.
“This is your last French lesson.” How did Franz react to this declaration of M. Hamel?
OR
How did Franz react to the declaration that it was their last French lesson?
Answer:
The announcement made by M. Hamel left a great impact not only on Franz but all the other citizens. Franz was shocked to hear that M. Hamel was leaving and that it was his last lesson. He realised that he would not be able to read and speak his own mother tongue and regretted his lack of interest and carelessness.

Question 7.
How did M. Hamel say farewell to his students and the people of the town?
Answer:
M. Hamel looked very pale and tall when he stood up in his chair. All the students were quiet. The village people old Hauser, the former Mayor, the former postmaster and several others were present in the schoolroom. The teacher told the villagers that French was the most beautiful language in the world. He ended the lesson by writing Vive La France on the blackboard. He made a gesture with his hand to indicate that the school is dismissed and students could go home.

Question 8.
Why had the bulletin board become a centre of attention during the last two years?
Answer:
For the past two years, the news of lost battles, the draft and the orders of the commanding officer were displayed on the bulletin board. People thronged the bulletin board to read all this information. This was the reason why it had become a centre of attention.

Question 9.
What was tempting Franz to keep away from school ‘that morning’?
Answer:
Franz was supposed to learn participles as part of his schoolwork, which he had not done. Therefore, he was afraid of being scolded by M. Hamel. Also, he wanted to spend the day outdoors as it was warm and bright. The sight of the chirping birds and the Prussian soldiers drilling appealed to him more than the rules of participles.

Question 10.
What was unusual about M. Hamel’s dress and behavior on the day of his last French lesson?
Answer:
Whenever Franz arrived late, he was met by an angry teacher. This time, however, he was astounded when he was welcomed by a kind and polite M. Hamel. This was quite contrary to his nature. Moreover, he was dressed in his best clothes, a beautiful green coat, frilled shirt and an embroidered black silk cap, which he wore only on inspection and prize days.

Question 11.
Why had M. Hamel put on his fine Sunday clothes? Why were the old men of the village sitting there in the back of the classroom?
OR
Who occupied the backbenches in the classroom on the day of the last lesson? Why?
Answer:
The back benches were occupied by the people of the village. Old Hansar, who had his three-cornered hat, the former Mayor, the former post master, and several other elders. They had come to express their respect and regard for M. Hamel and sorrow that he had to leave from their midst.

Question 12.
How did Franz perform when his turn came to recite? How did M. Hamel react?
Answer:
Franz’s name was called and he was asked to recite. Despite his best efforts, he got mixed up on the first words. He stood there holding on to his desk. His heart beat fast. And he did not dare look up. M. Hamel told him in a polite tone that he would not scold him as he was not the only one who neglected learning French. Many others in Alsace shared his fate because of procrastination. He said that every one had a great deal to reproach themselves with.

Question 13.
“We’ve all a great deal to reproach ourselves with.” Why did M. Hamel blame the parents and himself too for not showing due attention and care to the learning of French?
Answer:
M. Hamel did not hold Franz responsible for neglecting the learning of French. Most people of Alsace only pretended to be Frenchmen. But they could neither speak nor write their own language. The parents were not anxious to have them learn. They preferred to put children on a farm or at the mills to earn a little more money. He . even held himself responsible as he often sent his students to water his flowers instead of learning their lessons. He also used to give a holiday whenever he wanted to go fishing.

Question 14.
What does M. Hamel say about French language? What did he urge upon his students and villagers to do?
Answer:
M. Hamel talked at length about the French language. He considered French to be the most beautiful language in the world. It was the clearest and the most logical language too. He urged his students to guard it among themselves and reminded them never to forget it.

Question 15.
How does M. Hamel prove to be an ideal teacher?
Answer:
M. Hamel brings home the message of importance of love of mother tongue and patriotism. He explains things well and asks students to continue learning French even when he is gone. Hence, he proves to be an ideal teacher.

Question 16.
How was M. Hamel dressed differently that day? Why?
Answer:
M. Hamel wore a green coat, frilled shirt and black silk cap to the class. He announced that it was their last lesson in French and that German will be taught in the school in the future. He was proud of being French and was upset by occupation of Alsace by Germans. He was very attached to the town, the school and its people.

Question 17.
What had the narrator counted on to enter the school unnoticed?
Answer:
The teacher’s rap of the ruler, the banging of the desks, and the lessons repeated would be so loud that it could be heard in the street. The author thought this background would be a shield and he could enter the school unnoticed.

Question 18.
What changes did the order from Berlin cause in the school?
Answer:
The order from Berlin directed schools in the districts of Alsace and Lorraine in France to teach German instead of French.

Question 19.
Why were the elders of the village sitting in the classroom?
Answer:
The elders of the village came to the classroom to attend the last lesson of French in the school as a mark of respect to the French teacher, Mr Hamel who had been teaching there for the last forty years. These elders had not studied well, and could not read and write their mother tongue, French and so as it was the last opportunity for them, they came to attend the class.

Question 20.
How did Franz react to the declaration that it was their last French lesson?
Answer:
Franz was shocked and sad when he heard this news. Suddenly, he developed a liking for his language and was keen to learn French. He was remorseful for not learning well in the past and was sad that his teacher, Mr Hamel would go away.

Question 21.
What did Franz wonder about when he entered the class that day?
Answer:
He wondered why the classroom was still with no great bustle, the sound of desks opening and closing, lessons being repeated in unison, very loudly and M. Hamel’s great ruler rapping on the table.

Question 22.
Why was Franz not scolded for reaching the school late that day?
Answer:
Franz was not scolded that day as the situation was different than the other days. It was the last lesson in French by M. Hamel, who taught for forty years there. He regretted neglecting his classes earlier and wanted to compensate on the last day, before he left.

Question 23.
How were the parents and M. Hamel responsible for the children’s neglect of the French language?
Answer:
Parents were never keen or anxious to make their children learn French. They rather made them work in the fields or mills. Mr Hamel also lacked sincerity. He made the children water his garden during class hours or dismissed his class when he wanted to go for fishing.

Question 24.
“We’ve all a great deal to reproach ourselves with”, said M. Hamel. Refer to the context and explain what he wanted to convey to his students.
Answer:
M. Hamel wanted to convey to his students that still no loss has caused. If they desire, they can do a lot. Further, he advised them to move on and not to look back. He boosted the morale of his students by saying that though they have to blame themselves for not attending the school and he himself had to blame and disgrace himself for giving the holiday to students but hoped that they could mend their ways.

The Last Lesson Long Answer Questions

Question 1.
What is ‘linguistic chauvinism’? Analyse the order from Berlin in this light. How do you justify M. Hamel’s views about French and the new-found love of the people towards their language?
Answer:
Carrying pride in one’s language too far leads to ‘linguistic chauvinism’. We can analyse the order from Berlin in this light. It is nothing but a pure example of linguistic chauvinism. The imposition of German language over the French-speaking population can’t be justified at all. It is the worst kind of colonialism.

M. Hamel’s love for French is genuine. The shocking order from Berlin arouses patriotic feelings in him. He loves French and feels it to be the most beautiful language in the world. He calls it the clearest and the most logical language too. He regrets that the people of Alsace did not pay much heed to the learning of this great language. He asks the people to safeguard it among themselves.

It is the key to their unity and freedom. The people of Alsace, particularly the village elders, suddenly realise how precious their language is to them. Students like Franz too are not immune to patriotic feelings. Franz feels sorry for neglecting the learning of French. He hates the idea of German language being imposed on them. He remarks sarcastically, “Will they make them sing in German, even the pigeons?” The last lesson was so impactful that it helped to revive the love for the language among the people of Alsace.

Question 2.
How can you estimate M. Hamel as a man with a ruler and as a man with a gesture?
OR
How does M. Hamel prove to be an ideal teacher?
Answer:
In ‘The Last Lesson’, Alphonse Daudet presents M. Hamel’s character with due sympathy and respect. Initially, he is presented in the mould of a traditional schoolmaster. He used his terrible ruler under his arm. Everyone could hear the rapping of the ‘great ruler’ on the table even outside in the street. Franz reminds us ‘how cranky’ M. Hamel was. The students used to dread their schoolmaster. Franz was scared of being scolded as he had not prepared his lesson on participles. For a moment, he even thought of running away from school. Mr Hamel was a hard task master. He maintained discipline in the class.

The other side of Mr Hamel’s character is seen after the order from Berlin came. He had been transformed now. He became soft and gentle towards his students. He didn’t scold Franz for coming late. He did not even use his ruler when little Franz got mixed up and confused when his turn to recite came. He declared that it was his last lesson in French as from the next day German would be taught in the schools of Lorraine and Alsace. He would leave the next day. A new teacher would come in his place. He wore his best dress in honour of the last lesson.

M. Hamel was given respect not only by his students but even by the village elders. He was totally dedicated to the cause of teaching. He had been teaching for forty years in the same school. The village elders came to pay their respect to such a grand teacher. They sat on the back benches to listen to his last lesson.

M. Hamel loved France and French from the depth of his heart. He regarded French as the most beautiful language in the world. He told the people to guard it among themselves and never to forget it. On hearing the sound of trumpets of the Prussian soldiers under his window, patriotic feelings overpowered him. He mounted the chair and tried to speak, however something choked him. He wrote “Vive La France” with a piece of chalk on the blackboard and dismissed the class.

Question 3.
Write a character sketch of Franz.
Answer:
Franz was a student of a school in Alsace. His schoolmaster was M. Hamel. Franz was not brilliant. Franz enjoyed spending time out of doors. He liked the warm and bright day, and loved to listen to the chirping of the birds and watching the drilling of the Prussian soldiers. He preferred this instead of being in the classroom. He didn’t prepare his lesson on participles. When he was asked to recite, he got mixed up and confused. He was not excited to go to school and did not show any interest in M. Hamel’s teaching.But he was scared of M. Hamel’s scolding. He always dreaded the great ruler that M. Hamel kept under his arm. Franz knew how ‘cranky’ M. Hamel was.

However, Franz was forced to change his opinion about M. Hamel. An order came from Berlin pronouncing that German language would be taught in the schools of French districts of Alsace and Lorraine. On knowing that it was the last lesson that Mr Hamel was going to deliver, his views about him changed. He started respecting the man who had spent forty years in the same school. He felt sorry for not learning French.

He shared M. Hamel’s views about French. It was the most beautiful language in the world. Franz sarcastically remarked, “Will they make them sing in German, even the pigeons?” After the last lesson, his views about French took a patriotic turn. He listened to M. Hamel’s last lesson with rapt attention and dignity, and regretted having been careless and inattentive.

Question 4.
Our native language is part of our culture and we are proud of it. How does the presence of village elders in the classroom and M. Hamel’s last lesson show their love for French?
OR
Our language is part of our culture and we are proud of it. Describe how regretful M. Hamel and the village elders are for having neglected their native language, French.
Answer:
M. Hamel told the students and villagers that henceforth only German would be taught in the schools of Alsace and Lorraine. Those who called themselves Frenchmen would neither be able to speak nor write it. He praised French as the most beautiful, the clearest and the most logical language in the world. He said that for the enslaved people, their language was the key out of prison. Only then the people realised the importance of their language. This shows people’s love for their own culture, traditions and country. Pride in one’s language reflects pride in motherland.

When Franz jumbled while it was his turn to answer, M. Hamel expresses regret at the pathetic state of the language among the folks of Alsace. He regrets the fact that everyone chose to procrastinate. Also, he felt that the parents preferred their children worked in the farms for that extra income. He worried that the Germans would ridicule them for being incapable of speaking and writing their language. He blames everyone including himself for being careless, lazy and Lackadaisical (unenthusiastic and lack of determination).

Question 5.
Everybody during the last lesson is filled with regret. Comment.
Answer:
Everybody during the last lesson is filled with regret. There was a general sadness about not being able to utilise the opportunities of learning French when it was easily accessible. Franz wished that he had attended classes more often and regretted not being attentive in his classes earlier. He suddenly found his lessons more interesting and easy. The villagers, who were sitting at the usually empty back benches and had come to show their respect and gratitude to M. Hamel, regretted not going to school more than they did.

The order also brought about a great change in the feelings of the people towards their country and their native language. M. Hamel regretted sending his students to water his flowers instead of learning their lessons. He also regretted giving holiday to students whenever he wanted to go on fishing.

Question 6.
What changes did the narrator find in the school when the order from Berlin came?
Answer:
The order from Berlin prohibited teaching of French in the schools of Alsace and Lorraine. Instead, German was to be taught in the schools. Franz was late for school that day. He noticed that the hustle and bustle was missing. There was no opening and closing of desks, no repetition of lessons or rapping of the teacher’s ruler on the table could be heard. It was all very quiet and still.

Franz was further surprised because, instead of meeting an angry teacher, he was welcomed by a kind and polite teacher, who was dressed in his best clothes, a beautiful green coat, frilled shirt and an embroidered silk cap, which he wore only on inspection and prize days. The back benches were occupied by the village people who never came to school, as they were more concerned about their livelihood. He was further astounded to know that M Hamel was going to teach his last lesson that day.

Question 7.
Justify the title of the story, ‘The Last Lesson’.
Answer:
The title of the story, ‘The Last Lesson’ is self-relieving. The whole story revolves around the title. The beginning of the story serves as preparation for it. The title also conveys the central theme of the story—the fact that sometimes even the most precious things in our lives are taken for granted. The people of Alsace never gave much importance to the mother tongue, French.

They did not even insist their children to pay any attention to their language. They did not encourage regular attendance of their children in French classes. They preferred their children to work and earn, instead of studying. The order from Prussians made them realise the importance of their mother tongue. So they attend M. Hamel’s last lesson altogether. Thus, the title, ‘The Last Lesson’ is justified.

Question 8.
Write a character sketch of M. Hamel as a teacher.
Answer:
M. Hamel was a true French man who has been teaching French in the districts of Alsace and Lorraine for forty years. He loved his profession and was proud of his language, French. He had a deep sense of respect for his mother tongue. He considered French to be the most beautiful language in the world. As a teacher, he was very particular and strict in imparting knowledge to his students. When France was overtaken by Prussians, he was depressed because French was banned from being taught in the schools. While taking his last lesson, he tried his best to remain calm and composed.

His sorrow was evident in the way he was sitting in the class while his students were completing their writing assignments. He felt tormented at the fact that people had become indifferent to learning French and appealed to them to keep their language alive. He was a true patriot. He believed that mother tongue is a means of holding one’s identity and self¬respect. At the end of his last lesson, he writes ‘Vive La France!’ on the blackboard. This shows his love and concern for the people and the language of his country.

 

A learner needs to read stories thoroughly and accurately to score better in CBSE Class 12 English exams. NCERT Solutions for Class 12 English Flamingo Chapter 1 The Last Lesson has been answered by experts to ensure that the story can be easily understood. 

A Day In The Ashram Extra Questions And Answers Class 8 Karnataka Board

A Day In The Ashram Extra Questions And Answers Class 8 Karnataka Board

English is a difficult subject for many people to learn. Some students may become frustrated and give up, but here’s A Day In The Ashram Extra Questions And Answers Class 8 Karnataka Board to help you maintain your momentum! This A Day In The Ashram Extra Questions And Answers will provide all necessary information needed in order to study KSEEB Class 8 English successfully at home or school; it includes detailed grammar rules with examples that were used during today’s class discussion on Karnataka Board Exam English.

The A Day In The Ashram Extra Questions And Answers in English, Karnataka Board Class 8 makes it easier to understand the story. Understanding every detail of a story is important for scoring higher on an exam and expert writers have made sure that you know how everything flows together by summarizing perfectly!

Extra Questions and Answers

Question 1. Who is the author of the lesson ‘A Day in the Ashram’?

Answer:

C. F. Andrews is the author of the lesson ‘A Day in the Ashram’.

Question 2. Who founded Shantiniketan?

Answer:

Rabindranath Tagore founded Shantiniketan.

Question 3. What do the choristers of the Ashram do?

Answer:

The choristers go round the Ashram singing hymns.

Question 4. What gives peace to the soul?

Answer:

The melodious sound of the hymns sung by the choristers early in the morning gives peace to the soul.

Question 5. Why do the boys go into the fields with their asanas?

Answer:

The boys go into the fields to meditate alone in the silence of the morning.

Question 6. What do the boys sing before school work begins?

Answer:

The boys sing their hymn before the school work begins.

Question 7. There are no classrooms in Shantiniketan. Where do the boys sit and learn?

Answer:

The boys sit in small groups of eight or ten under the trees with their teachers.

Question 8. How are things learned by the boys?

Answer:

The boys learn through conversation. They ask questions, discuss, and clarify their doubts.

Question 9. What does C.F. Andrews call the education imparted in the Ashram?

Answer:

C. F. Andrews calls the education imparted in the Ashram “Living education”.

Question 10. When do the morning classes come to an end?

Answer:

The morning classes go on till half-past ten.

Question 11. When do the afternoon classes begin?

Answer:

The afternoon classes begin at two o’clock.

Question 12. How do the boys discover their natural tastes?

Answer:

A variety of handicrafts are taught and practised in the afternoon classes. The boys try their hand at each of them and discover the handiwork that they like.

Question 13. Give a list of the handicrafts practised by the boys.

Answer:

a) Carpentry

b) spinning

c) weaving

d) drafting

e) painting

f) mechanical work

g) playing musical instruments.

Question 14. What do the boys do after the school work is over?

Answer:

The boys go into the fields to play football and other games.

Question 15. When do the boys go to bed?

Answer:

The boys go to bed by nine o’clock at night.

Question 16. What do the faces of the boys tell?

Answer:

The faces of the boys tell the story of their joy and their freedom.

Multiple Choice Questions:

Four alternatives are given for each of the following questions/ incomplete statements. Choose the most appropriate one.

Question 1.
‘A Day in the Ashram’ is written by

A) A.L. Hendricks
B) Charles Dickens
C) C.F Andrews
D) Daniel Miller

Answer:

C) C.F Andrews

Question 2.
Whose experience does the lesson ‘A Day in the Ashram’ reveal?

A) Choristers
B) Students
C) Rabindranath Tagore
D) C.F. Andrews

Answer:

D) C.F. Andrews

Question 3.
Shantiniketan was founded by

A) Rabindranath Tagore
B) C.F Andrews
C) Mahatma Gandhi
D) C.V. Raman

Answer:

A) Rabindranath Tagore

Question 4.
The person who was referred to as ‘Gurudeva’ was

A) C.F Andrews
B) Mahatma Gandhi
C) Devendranath Tagore
D) Rabindranath Tagore

Answer:

D) Rabindranath Tagore

Question 5.
Who has referred to Shantiniketan as ‘The darling of our hearts’?

A) Mahatma Gandhi
B) Rabindranath Tagore
C) C.F. Andrews
D) Sarojini Naidu

Answer:

B) Rabindranath Tagore

Question 6.
The first to rise in the morning in Shantiniketan is the

A) boys
B) choristers
C) teachers
D) students
Answer:

B) choristers

Question 7.
In the ashram, what gives peace to the soul?

A) The singing of the birds in the amloki groves
B) The boys meditating in the fields in the morning
C) The beauty of the sound of the choristers singing in the morning
D) The boys standing in the shade of the trees and singing hymns.

Answer:

C) The beauty of the sound of the choristers singing in the morning

Question 8.
The boys at Shantiniketan study in the

A) open-air
B) classroom
C) playground
D) auditorium

Answer:

A) open-air

Question 9.
A greater part of the teaching in Shantiniketan is carried on through

A) books
B) discussions
C) conversation
D) examinations

Answer:

C) conversation

Question 10.
What kind of work do the boys practice in the afternoon?

A) Sports
B) Bookwork
C) Singing
D) Handicraft

Answer:

D) Handicraft

Question 11.
In the ashram, the boys’ own natural tastes are discovered through

A) singing of hymns
B) the handiwork they practice
C) sports and games
D) reciting of short dramas

Answer:

B) the handiwork they practice

Question 12.
The school at Shantiniketan is over at

A) five O’clock
B) four O’clock
C) two O’clock
D) three O’clock

Answer:

B) four O’clock

Question 13.
The Shantiniketan boys are famous for

A) sports and games
B) studies
C) discipline
D) knowledge

Answer:

A) sports and games

Question 14.
The boys spend the evenings before they go to bed

A) telling fairy tales
B) reciting short dramas
C) singing Gurudeva’s songs
D) all of the above

Answer:

D) all of the above

It is important for a learner to read stories thoroughly and accurately in order to score better in KSEEB Class 8 English exams. A Day In The Ashram Extra Questions And Answers In English Karnataka Board Class 8 has been given by experts to ensure that the story can be easily understood. Hope you found this A Day In The Ashram Extra Questions And Answers helpful.

A Day In The Ashram Textbook Questions And Answers Class 8 Karnataka Board

A Day In The Ashram Textbook Questions And Answers Class 8 Karnataka Board

English is a difficult subject for many people to learn. Some students may become frustrated and give up, but here’s A Day In The Ashram Textbook Questions And Answers Class 8 Karnataka Board to help you maintain your momentum! This A Day In The Ashram Textbook Questions And Answers will provide all necessary information needed in order to study KSEEB Class 8 English successfully at home or school; it includes detailed grammar rules with examples that were used during today’s class discussion on Karnataka Board Exam English.

The A Day In The Ashram Textbook Questions And Answers in English, Karnataka Board Class 8 makes it easier to understand the story. Understanding every detail of a story is important for scoring higher on an exam and expert writers have made sure that you know how everything flows together by summarizing perfectly!

Theme

A day in the Ashram’ is the experience of C. F. Andrews while he stayed in the Ashram known as ‘Shanthiniketan’founded by Rabindranath Tagore, he was famous as ‘Gurudeva’. Shantiniketan was his dream school. He was one of the important educationists. All his ideas are practically applied in this school. It is one of the important internationally popular school. The beauty of Shantiniketan is not found visibly. Its importance lies in its quality of education and the way of teaching. Irrespective of age all who have visited it, appreciate and feel its inner beauty Gurudeva says that all the students learned here never forgot their student life and they reached a very great height in future life. Our ex-Prime Minister Smt. Indira Gandhi was one of the students of Shantiniketan.

Questions And Answers

Education for Life

1. There were no classes. Students were moving around freely. Some were reading books and trying to memorize answers.

2. His son was sitting on a tree, watching the birds singing. He was also trying to draw pictures of the birds.

3. The headmaster said that reading and memorizing answers is not learning. Real learning is studying Nature and learning from it.4. No. It also means observing the surroundings and learning from them.

IRA – Some statements are given below. If you agree to tick [Yes]. If not tick [No].

1. No.

2. Yes.

3. Yes.

4. Yes.

5. Yes.

Textbook Questions and Answers

C1 Answer the following questions and share your responses with your partner.

1. Who named the School Shantiniketan?
Rabindranath Tagore named the school Shantiniketan.

2. When does the day in Shantiniketan begin?
The day begins long before sunrise.

3. What is termed by Gurudev as the darling of our hearts?
Shantiniketan is termed as ‘the darling of our hearts’.

4. Which phrase is used in paragraph to mean both the old the young people?
The phrase used is “old and young alike”.

5. The boys in Shantiniketan get up early in the morning. Who else are the early risers?
The birds are the early risers.

C2. Work in pairs. Answer the following questions and share your responses with your partners.

1. What kind of work do the boys practise in the afternoon?
The boys practise handiwork such as carpentry, mechanics, spinning, weaving, painting, drafting and musical instruments.

2. What are Shantinikethan boys famous for?
Shantiniketan boys are famous for their sports and games.

3. How do the boys spend evenings before they go to bed?
The boys meditate for some time. They participate in school gatherings. They tell fairy tales, recite short dramas and sing Gurudeva’s songs.

4. Read the second Paragraph carefully what it describes is_
(b) The song of the choristers.

C3 Read and discuss your responses with your partner. Then write.

1. What is the effect of the song of the choristers on the listeners?
The beauty of the sound of the song in the silence of morning brings joy, reverence and peace to the soul of the listeners.

2. How are the classes held in the afternoon in Shantiniketan?
The afternoon classes start at 2 ‘O’Clock in Shantiniketan. The class chiefly consists of handiwork. The boys could learn their own choice of interest. The different handiwork’s to be taught were Carpentry, Spinning, Weaving, drafting, painting, music, etc.

3. How do the boys spend their evenings in Shantiniketan?
In the evening boys play in the field. They play a variety of games, especially football. After the game, the boys return from the playfields. All the boys sit to meditate in silence for a short time.

4. How are the classes at Shantiniketan different from the classes in other schools?
There are no classrooms in Shantiniketan. The classes are held in the open fields, under the trees. A group of eight or ten boys sit with their teacher under the trees and discuss things. The boys have the freedom to study what interests them. Very few books are used. The teachers help the students to learn on their own. In other schools, there are fixed timings, prescribed textbooks. The students are expected to read the books, learn the answers for questions by heart, and reproduce them in the examination. There is no freedom for the students.

5. How does Shantiniketan prepare the boys for life?
Shantiniketan was founded by Rabindranath Tagore. It is different from other schools in providing education. The boys enjoy freedom and are not forced to learn a particular thing. Teachers help the boys to learn things that interest them. There is scope for the boys to discover their own talents and capabilities. The boys enjoy learning things which would help them in their future life. The school aims at all-round development of the boys. The boys gain confidence and become ready to face the challenges of life.

C4. The writer has used the phrase ‘living education’ to describe the experience in Shantiniketan. Some features of education are given below. Classify them into the categories of ‘living education’ and ‘unimaginative instruction’.

Task 2. Fill in the blanks using ‘a’, ‘an’ or ‘the’ only where necessary. If no article is necessary to write (ø) in the blank.

1. an, a, a, The, ø,

2. ø, the, ø, the, an, the, ø.

3. ø, the, an, ø, ø, ø.

Task 3. Look at the following pairs of sentences. Why is ‘the’ (the definite article) used in some cases but not in others? Discuss with your partner and write the reason.

Answer:

1. The indefinite article ‘a’ is used because the reference is to any ‘one’ tiger.

2. The definite article ‘the’ is used as it refers to the particular tiger on the calendar.

3. No article is used as places of worship, educational institutions, places of work, etc., have no article before them when they are referred to for the primary purpose. For example, a student would say, ‘I went to school to collect my books.’ An old student would say, ‘I went to the school to collect my TC.’

4. Here, the definite article ‘the’ is used as the reference is to one particular hospital.

Fill in the blanks with suitable articles:

1. A

2. The

3. the

4. the

5. an

6. the

Task 4. What do you understand after doing these exercises? Answer the following questions by filling in the blanks:

1. uncountable

2. plural

3. the

4. singular/countable

5. plural

6. the article, indefinite.

E. Writing:

Choice of words:

1. forgetful

2. punctual

3. lazy

4. shy

5. flexible.

It is important for a learner to read stories thoroughly and accurately in order to score better in KSEEB Class 8 English exams. A Day In The Ashram Textbook Questions And Answers In English Karnataka Board Class 8 has been given by experts to ensure that the story can be easily understood. Hope you found this A Day In The Ashram Textbook Questions And Answers helpful.

For A Five Year Old Extra Questions And Answers Class 8 Karnataka Board

For A Five Year Old Extra Questions And Answers Class 8 Karnataka Board

English is a difficult subject for many to learn. Some students may become frustrated and give up, but here’s For A Five Year Old Extra Questions And Answers Class 8 Karnataka Board to help you maintain your momentum! This For A Five Year Old Extra Questions And Answers will provide all necessary information needed in order to study KSEEB Class 8 English successfully at home or school; it includes detailed grammar rules with examples that were used during today’s class discussion on Karnataka Board Exam English.

For A Five Year Old Extra Questions And Answers in English, Karnataka Board Class 8 makes it easier to understand the story. Understanding every detail of a story is important for scoring higher on an exam and expert writers have made sure that you know how everything flows together by summarizing perfectly!

Extra Questions

Comprehension:

Read the following extracts and answer the questions that follow:

Question 1.

I explain That it would be unkind to leave it there:
Who is ‘I’? What does ‘it’ refer to? Why would it be unkind to leave it there?

Answer:

T is the mother or the poet.

‘It’ refers to the snail.

It would be unkind to leave the snail there as it might crawl to the floor and get crushed under one’s foot.

Question 2.

I see, then, that a kind of faith prevails:
Your gentleness is moulded still by words.

What is the faith referred to?
In the extract, whose character has been moulded by words, according to the poet?
Is it correct to say that gentleness is still moulded by words of advice?

Answer:

The faith that character fs built by words of advice than by imitation of others.

The character of the five-year-old child.

No, it is not true to say so. It is only a prevailing belief, not based on truth.

Question 3.

And who purveyed the harshest kind of truth to many another.
From which poem are these lines taken? Who has purveyed the harshest kind of truth? What is the truth purveyed?

Answer:

From the poem ‘To a Five Year Old’.

The mother. The truth that there is a difference between what we preach and what we practise.

Summary

“Practise what you preach” is an old saying. The poet, in this poem, brings out the contradictions in our behaviour. A mother is a speaker in the poem. She narrates an incident and points out the big difference between what we preach and what we practise.

A child sees a snail climbing up the windowsill into his room. It calls its mother to see it. The mother tells the child that it is unsafe for the snail to be left like that.

It might crawl to the floor and might get crushed under one foot. The child understands. It picks up the snail gently, carries it outside carefully and leaves it near a daffodil plant so that it could feed on a daffodil flower.

The mother is happy that still, the belief that gentleness and good character are learnt by words of advice prevails. Children develop such good qualities by listening to what parent and other elders say.

At the same time, she feels guilty. She has advised her child to be kind and compassionate towards the snail, but she had killed mice, wild birds, kittens and so on.

She had not treated her relatives properly. Also, she had conveyed the harshest kind of truth to many others, without bothering how it would affect them. She had not practised what she wanted her child to learn.

She consoles herself at the end. And, she is practical-minded and knows that is how things are happening around her. People say one thing and do exactly the opposite. It reminds us of another saying “Do as I say, but don’t do as I do”. The mother consoles herself saying that she and her child are kind to snails.

Conclusion

It is important for a learner to read stories thoroughly and accurately in order to score better in KSEEB Class 8 English exams. For A Five Year Old Extra Questions And Answers Class 8 Karnataka Board Class 8 has been given by experts to ensure that the story can be easily understood. Hope you found this For A Five Year Old Extra Questions And Answers helpful.

For A Five Year Old Textbook Questions And Answers Class 8 Karnataka Board

For A Five Year Old Textbook Questions And Answers Class 8 Karnataka Board

English is a difficult subject for many to learn. Some students may become frustrated and give up, but here’s For A Five Year Old Textbook Questions And Answers Class 8 Karnataka Board to help you maintain your momentum! This For A Five Year Old Textbook Questions And Answers will provide all necessary information needed in order to study KSEEB Class 8 English successfully at home or school; it includes detailed grammar rules with examples that were used during today’s class discussion on Karnataka Board Exam English.

The For A Five Year Old Textbook Questions And Answers in English, Karnataka Board Class 8 makes it easier to understand the story. Understanding every detail of a story is important for scoring higher on an exam and expert writers have made sure that you know how everything flows together by summarizing perfectly!

Textbook Questions and Answers:

C1. Answer the following questions and share your responses with your partner:

Question 1. Name the creature mentioned in the Poem.

Answer:

A snail

Question 2. Who do you think is the speaker?

Answer:

The speaker in the poem is a mother.

Question 3. Who is the speaker addressing?

Answer:

The speaker is addressing her child.

Question 4. What does the child want his mother to see?

Answer:

The child wants his mother to see a snail crawling up the windowsill.

Question 5. What does the mother tell the child?

Answer:

The Mother tells her child to carry the snail carefully, outside, and leave to feed on daffodils.

Read and Write:

C2. Read and discuss your responses with your partner. Then write:

Question 1. Why does the mother say ‘a kind of faith prevails’?

Answer:

The mother feels happy that a child learns good manners and good behavior. And it develops a good character by words of advice and not by imitating others.

Question 2. How has the mother treated other animals?

Answer:

The mother has not treated other animals kindly. She has trapped mice, shot wild birds, and drowned kittens.

Question 3. Do you observe any difference between the mother’s treatment of the snail and her treatment of other animals and her relatives?

Answer:

Yes, there is a lot of difference between the treatment of snails and other animals. Other animals were treated cruelly. The mother treated the snail very kindly and she advised her child to be kind to the snail.

Question 4. How does the mother console herself? Read the last two lines and comment.

Answer:

Mother has behaved like others. A snail was harmless so it could be treated kindly but other animals are harmful, so it is not easy to treat them kindly. All people are like this only. Everyone preaches good but they do not follow it in action. So mother consoles herself like this and said that she and her child are kind to snails.

Summary

“Practise what you preach” is an old saying. The poet, in this poem, brings out the contradictions in our behaviour. A mother is a speaker in the poem. She narrates an incident and points out the big difference between what we preach and what we practise.

A child sees a snail climbing up the windowsill into his room. It calls its mother to see it. The mother tells the child that it is unsafe for the snail to be left like that.

It might crawl to the floor and might get crushed under one foot. The child understands. It picks up the snail gently, carries it outside carefully and leaves it near a daffodil plant so that it could feed on a daffodil flower.

The mother is happy that still, the belief that gentleness and good character are learnt by words of advice prevails. Children develop such good qualities by listening to what parent and other elders say.

At the same time, she feels guilty. She has advised her child to be kind and compassionate towards the snail, but she had killed mice, wild birds, kittens and so on.

She had not treated her relatives properly. Also, she had conveyed the harshest kind of truth to many others, without bothering how it would affect them. She had not practised what she wanted her child to learn.

She consoles herself at the end. And, she is practical-minded and knows that is how things are happening around her. People say one thing and do exactly the opposite. It reminds us of another saying “Do as I say, but don’t do as I do”. The mother consoles herself saying that she and her child are kind to snails.

Conclusion

It is important for a learner to read stories thoroughly and accurately in order to score better in KSEEB Class 8 English exams. For A Five Year Old Textbook Questions And Answers Class 8 Karnataka Board has been given by experts to ensure that the story can be easily understood. Hope you found this For A Five Year Old Textbook Questions And Answers helpful.

For A Five Year Old Poem Analysis Class 8 Karnataka Board

For A Five Year Old Poem Analysis Class 8 Karnataka Board

English is a difficult subject for many people to learn. Some students may become frustrated and give up, but here’s For A Five Year Old Poem Analysis Class 8 Karnataka Board to help you maintain your momentum! This For A Five Year Old Poem Analysis will provide all necessary information needed in order to study KSEEB Class 8 English successfully at home or school; it includes detailed grammar rules with examples that were used during today’s class discussion on Karnataka Board Exam English.

The For A Five Year Old Poem Analysis, Karnataka Board Class 8 makes it easier to understand the story. Understanding every detail of a story is important for scoring higher on an exam and expert writers have made sure that you know how everything flows together by summarizing perfectly!

Summary

“Practise what you preach” is an old saying. The poet, in this poem, brings out the contradictions in our behaviour. A mother is a speaker in the poem. She narrates an incident and points out the big difference between what we preach and what we practise.

A child sees a snail climbing up the windowsill into his room. It calls its mother to see it. The mother tells the child that it is unsafe for the snail to be left like that.

It might crawl to the floor and might get crushed under one foot. The child understands. It picks up the snail gently, carries it outside carefully and leaves it near a daffodil plant so that it could feed on a daffodil flower.

The mother is happy that still, the belief that gentleness and good character are learnt by words of advice prevails. Children develop such good qualities by listening to what parent and other elders say.

At the same time, she feels guilty. She has advised her child to be kind and compassionate towards the snail, but she had killed mice, wild birds, kittens and so on.

She had not treated her relatives properly. Also, she had conveyed the harshest kind of truth to many others, without bothering how it would affect them. She had not practised what she wanted her child to learn.

She consoles herself at the end. And, she is practical-minded and knows that is how things are happening around her. People say one thing and do exactly the opposite. It reminds us of another saying “Do as I say, but don’t do as I do”. The mother consoles herself saying that she and her child are kind to snails.

About The Author:

Fleur Adcock was born in New Zealand in 1934. Later on, she migrated to England and became a British citizen. She worked as a librarian in London. Her poems mainly deal with the everyday experiences of a woman as a wife and a mother.

Background

This poem is a satire against the belief that we can mould our children rather by our words than by imitation of what we do.

Theme

Practice what u preach is the main theme if the poem. One should not be deceptive while preaching to others and must follow what they preach to others.

Line By Line Analysis

The first stanza has a child-like innocence and curiosity for the snail that meanders in the room.

The mother also begins with a compassionate and nurturing tone but switched to a disenchanted one. The listing style in the middle of the second stanza is almost rushing or skimming over the shady parts of the mother’s life, almost like she’s hiding something or is ashamed. Then, the poem returns to the innocence of the snail which is hypocritical.

It is important for a learner to read stories thoroughly and accurately in order to score better in KSEEB Class 8 English exams. For A Five Year Old Poem Analysis In English Chapter 1 Karnataka Board Class 8 has been given by experts to ensure that the story can be easily understood. Hope you found this For A Five Year Old Poem Analysis  helpful.

No Men Are Foreign Extra Questions And Answers Class 8 Karnataka Board

No Men Are Foreign Extra Questions And Answers Class 8 Karnataka Board

English is a difficult subject for many people to learn. Some students may become frustrated and give up, but here’s No Men Are Foreign Extra Questions And Answers Class 8 Karnataka Board to help you maintain your momentum! This No Men Are Foreign Extra Questions And Answers will provide all necessary information needed in order to study KSEEB Class 8 English successfully at home or school; it includes detailed grammar rules with examples that were used during today’s class discussion on Karnataka Board Exam English.

The No Men Are Foreign Extra Questions And Answers in English, Karnataka Board Class 8 makes it easier to understand the story. Understanding every detail of a story is important for scoring higher on an exam and expert writers have made sure that you know how everything flows together by summarizing perfectly!

Extra Questions and Answers

Question 1. What does a peaceful harvest refer to?

Answer:

Peaceful harvest refers to peacetime and the prosperity one has in times of peace.

Question 2. In what way is starvation associated with winter?

Answer:

Wintertime is associated with cessation of activity and end of productivity. The time of war is as bleak as the time of winter. Life comes to a standstill and people die of starvation at the time of war

Question 3. What are the hells of fire and dust? What do they destroy?

Answer:

Hells of fire and dust are the fire, smoke and dust from bombs and gunfire. They pollute the air which was given by God to all in pristine purity. The poet reminds us that we have no right to spoil what is commonly owned by all children of God.

Question 4. What is the innocence of air? How is it defiled?

Answer:

The innocence of air is the purity of air. It is defiled by the guns and bombs used in wars. In other words, the innocence of air is spoilt by the wickedness of man. The poet seems to suggest that all gifts of God are pure and any act of defilement is evil.

Question 5. What does the poet emphasise by beginning and ending the poem with the same line?

Answer:

When a word, phrase, clause or sentence is repeated, the repetition is for the emphasis. The poet intends to drive home the truth that thinking of people of foreign countries as strangers is an unnecessary man-made barrier that should be broken.

Question 6. What does the poet mean by ‘they, too, are aware of the sun, air and water? What is the significance of the word ‘too’ here?

Answer:

People living in other countries are not strangers. They, too, are like us. They get the same sunlight, breathe the same air and drink the same water as we. The word ‘too’ is used to emphasize the fact that people living in other countries are the same as we are.

Question 7. War is the enemy of our environment. How?

Answer:

When we fight a war and use dreadful weapons against others, we pollute our environment with the dust and the smoke of the guns.

Question 8. Why does Kirkup think that ‘no men are strange………… Beneath all uniforms’?

Answer:

Uniforms are military uniforms that distinguish soldiers of one country from those of another. In the time of war, uniforms are necessary so that enemy soldiers can be killed. But, the poet’s concern is to show that the uniform stands for superficial differences and beneath the uniform all men are the same. They are all creations of God, breathing alike.

Question 9. What happens when war breaks out?

Answer:

When we wage war and use dreadful weapons against, others, we defile our earth. The dust and smoke of guns pollute the very air we breathe.

Question 10. What commonalities of life can be found everywhere? OR What are the commonalities Kirkup highlights to prove that all human beings are one?

Answer:

The commonalities of life that can be found everywhere are – beneath the different clothes that people wear they possess the same body, people live and die on the same earth, people living in different lands get the same sunlight, breathe the same air and drink the same water, people have the same hands that are destined to work hard, and all people have eyes that wake or sleep.

Question 11. What are the evils of war, according to the poet?

Answer:

The poet advises people to shun hatred and warfare. The poet says that during peace, people enjoy the harvests and prosper, whereas during the war people experience distress and scarcity of food. He further says that when we hate others, we rob, deceive and condemn ourselves. When we fight against others we defile the purity of our earth. The fire and smoke from the weapons of war poison the air which we all breathe and is essential for our existence.

Figures of Speech:

C3. Name the figure of speech in these lines:

Fed by peaceful harvests. War’s long winter starved. Our hells of fire and dust. Outrage the innocence of air.

Answer:

1)Metaphor

2)Metaphor

3)Metaphor

4)Metaphor.

Multiple Choice Questions:

Four alternatives are given for each of the following questions/incomplete statements. Choose the most appropriate one.

Question 1. The poem ‘No Men are Foreign’ is written by

A) James Kirkup
B) Henry Wotton
C) Isaac Watts
D) Sarojini Naidu

Answer:

A) James Kirkup

Question 2. The people who are referred to as brothers are

A) other soldiers
B) strangers
C) foreigners
D) fellow human beings

Answer:

D) fellow human beings

Question 3. Hells of fire and dust refer to

A) destruction of hell
B) fire, smoke and dust from bombs and gunfire
C) the burning down of hell
D) war that takes place in hell.

Answer:

B) fire, smoke and dust from bombs and gunfire

Question 4. The hells of fire and dust destroy the

A) air in hell
B) soldiers
C) peaceful harvests
D) purity of air

Answer:

D) purity of air

Question 5. The force that can win over others’ strength is

A) war
B) love
C) hatred
D) peaceful harvests

Answer:

B) love

Question 6. The example that the poet gives to prove that life is common everywhere is

A) people wake up and sleep in the same manner all over the world
B) there are wars everywhere
C) people hate others everywhere
D) the air is the same everywhere

Answer:

A) people wake up and sleep in the same manner all over the world

Question 7. If we take up arms against each other

A) there will be war
B) there will be destruction
C) there will be fire and dust in hell
D) we defile the earth

Answer:

D) we defile the earth

Question 8. War’s long winter is starved because

A) winters become longer due to war
B) there is no harvest
C) everything is in short supply due to war
D) war delays the coming of spring.

Answer:

C) everything is in short supply due to war

It is important for a learner to read stories thoroughly and accurately in order to score better in KSEEB Class 8 English exams. No Men Are Foreign Extra Questions And Answers In English Karnataka Board Class 8 has been given by experts to ensure that the story can be easily understood. Hope you found this No Men Are Foreign Extra Questions And Answers helpful.

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